Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

A few remaining questions...

Expand Messages
  • Ross
    Our feast was pushed back from A.D. VIII KAL. IUN. MMDCCLXV A.U.C. to A.D. VII KAL. IUN. MMDCCLXV A.U.C., may our Lares continue to help us. But I still have a
    Message 1 of 3 , May 22, 2013
    • 0 Attachment
      Our feast was pushed back from A.D. VIII KAL. IUN. MMDCCLXV A.U.C. to A.D. VII KAL. IUN. MMDCCLXV A.U.C., may our Lares continue to help us. But I still have a few questions:

      Would the Romans of approximately 1900 years ago have served warm appetizers as a part of the gustum/gustatio?

      Would they have considered beef tongue to be too indigestible to be a part of the gustum/gustatio?

      Could they ever have served anything cold as a part of the primae mensae?
    • Hilary Cool
      Re Beef tongue. It all depends where you are imagining your feast taking place. If it is Italy, then the animal bone evidence from archaeological sites
      Message 2 of 3 , May 23, 2013
      • 0 Attachment
        Re Beef tongue. It all depends where you are imagining your feast taking
        place. If it is Italy, then the animal bone evidence from archaeological
        sites suggests that it is pork not beef that was the favoured meat. It is
        the northern provinces where beef was preferred. There is a good article in
        the Journal of Roman Archaeology volume 12 (1999). Meat diet in the Roman
        World: a regional inter-site comparison by Anthony King (pp.168-202) where
        you will find useful data.



        Hilary Cool



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Ross
        We never set an exact location, so we can certainly imagine it is taking place in western Gaul or thereabouts. I never imagined this one dish would be so much
        Message 3 of 3 , May 23, 2013
        • 0 Attachment
          We never set an exact location, so we can certainly imagine it is taking place in western Gaul or thereabouts.

          I never imagined this one dish would be so much trouble. I had dried black mulberries from Kalustyan's and I was basically looking for an excuse to make Dalby and Grainger's mulberry sauce from page 75 of "The Classical Cookbook" (the only recipe I am using not by Apicius). And now at the last minute I am tearing my hair out.

          Here's my menu as it stands right now (probably some things like caper berries and whatnot won't be available when we do our final shopping so they will just be deleted from the final version)

          Should the tongue be part of the Gustatio or the Primae Mensae?

          Should the tongue be served hot or cold?

          For that matter, should the Patina be served hot or cold?


          FOR THE TABLE:

          Mixed olives, caper berries, pickled garlic cloves, and skinned Hispanian almonds, toasted in olive oil and salted

          Mixed mushrooms in olive oil, vinegar, wine and spices

          A round loaf of finest white wheat flour and oil of Koroneiki olives of Lakonia

          GUSTATIO:


          Medium boiled pheasants' eggs, served warm, in pine nut sauce

          Romaine leaves with condiment sauce of sweet cheese, Greek honey, dates, and plentiful pepper

          "Parthian" chickpeas in a laser sauce

          Cold boiled tongue of a calf, thinly sliced and served with Athenian mulberry sauce

          Patina of pears with passum and honey

          Wine: Mulsum made with local dry white wine and clover honey

          PRIMAE MENSAE:

          Duck in prune sauce

          Sardines stuffed with herbs and spices and steamed in parchment paper

          Wine: Amarone della Valpolicella

          SECUNDAE MENSAE:

          Fresh dates stuffed with pounded African pepper, rolled in sea salt and fried in honey

          Fried polenta squares of finest white creamed wheat with goat's milk, dressed in Greek honey

          Fine Cheeses of the Provinces: "Roquefort" of Gaul, "Roncal" of Hispania, "Zamorano" of Lusitania, and "Pecorino Sardo" of Sardinia

          Fresh figs, Muscat grapes, candied melon, dried pears, prunes, dates, and golden raisins

          Wines: Recioto di Soave and Recioto della Valpolicella
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.