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Re: Ancient Product Branding

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  • Howard Major,J
    I yield to your superior knowledge. Have one of your books. Britannicus
    Message 1 of 9 , Jan 4, 2013
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      I yield to your superior knowledge. Have one of your books.

      Britannicus

      --- In Apicius@yahoogroups.com, sallygrain@... wrote:
      >
      >
      > Hi all
      >
      > My take would be that there was a specific sauce made with v small fish which was originally Greek and was called garon. A fish brine - from salted fish - was lighter in colour but similar in flavours when aged but was not another type of garon in Greek but had a separate name halmer, (muria in latin).
      > Then when garon came to Rome it was transliterated into garum but still the same sauce, then other sauces are developed including a blood viscera sauce which is considerd elite and is used at table by the gourmet who out of ignorance of the differeneces between the various types of sauce continue to use garum at table and in their literature while the manufacturer,trader and cook, to distinguish the black bloody sauce from the light brown v small fish sauce coined the new term liquamen from to liquefy so garon = liquamen. The primary product was always garon/liquamen. There is technically no generic term in latin or Greek per se as the manufacturer, cook trader only ever used specific terms while the literatti - who did not understand - used garum or liquamen in the belief that they functioned generically. As the blood viscera sauce eventually became less popular and less visable - it was not sufficiently popular to warrent its own price on Diocletians price edict - the term liquamen became the one most commonly used and therfore appeared to function generically.
      >
      > It is v complex and I do not claim to have it all but the basic - that the Greek and latin terms garon/garum meant different sauces - I would stake my life on!
      > Sally Grainger
      >
      >
      > -----Original Message-----
      > From: Howard Major,J
      > To: Apicius
      > Sent: Wed, 2 Jan 2013 5:56
      > Subject: [Apicius] Re: Ancient Product Branding
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Wasn't "Garum" actually a "brand" name for one variety of liquamen that became a "generic" term (like "Coke" for soft drinks in general)?
      >
      > Britannicus
      >
      > --- In Apicius@yahoogroups.com, "Kevin McDermott" wrote:
      > >
      > > --- In Apicius@yahoogroups.com, Correus wrote:
      > > > For those of you interested in baking mold imprints:
      > > > http://blog.epromos.com/archives/2006/07/
      > > > It's almost half way down the page.
      > >
      > > Thanks for the link, Correus; good to see some action on the list! The silence
      > > following my post about Sally's OFELLAE was deafening. Justin did make
      > > them for his CENA ROMANA, and they received very high marks from the
      > > diners. But I'll leave him to tell that story, if he has the time/inclination.
      > >
      > > The mold--if that is indeed what this is--has been cited before on this list in
      > > message 3513, which also give this link to a description of the object:
      > >
      > >
      > > What's not mentioned is the material of which the original is made; it might be
      > > metal, but it seems somewhat more likely that it's stone, like all the other
      > > epigraphic squeezes in the volume. And, if stone, then it becomes more
      > > difficult to see it as an actual breadstamp--although, of course, this doesn't at
      > > all rule out the fact that it might REPRODUCE the stamp used on the product,
      > > and the stone effigy was, if you will, a shopsign reproducing the trademark
      > > label, i.e., "None genuine without this signature" like the 19C patent bottles
      > > have it. And, were that to be true, yes: product branding.
      > >
      > > Martial mentions a tuscan cheese from the town of Luni, whose trademark in
      > > Roman times was.....a crescent moon. (APOPHORETA XIII:30 CASEVS
      > > LVNENSIS Caseus Etruscae signatus imagine Lunae praestabit pueris
      > > prandia mille tuis.
      > >
      > > I'd be interested in knowing if anyone out there knows of any other
      > > documented "trademarks" for food from the Roman world?
      > >
      > > COIVINIX�DERVMODIGIS�F�PISTOR
      > >
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      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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