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Re: [Apicius] roman herbs for garden

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  • Correus
    Ave! Check this site out for herbs: http://www.housedragonor.org/A&S/herbs-gwen.html Here are some books. The Roman Cookery Book Barbara Flower & Elisabeth
    Message 1 of 9 , Nov 19, 2012
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      Ave!

      Check this site out for herbs: http://www.housedragonor.org/A&S/herbs-gwen.html

      Here are some books.

      The Roman Cookery Book
      Barbara Flower & Elisabeth Rosenbaum
      THE BEST!!!!! Be warned though - no quantities given;

      Cooking Apicius: Roman Recipes for Today
      Sally Grainger and Andras Kaldor;
      EXCELLENT!!!!;
       
      Apicius, a Critical Edition With an Introduction And
      English Translation
      Christopher Grocock, Sally Grainger, and Dan Shadrake
      AWESOME!!!!;
       
      Roman Cookery: Ancient Recipes for Modern Kitchens
      Mark Grant
      Collection of recipes, especially bread, NOT from Apicius;

      Around the Roman Table: Food and Feasting in Ancient Rome
      Patrick Faas.

      Vale!
      Correus




      ________________________________
      From: Marianne Perdomo <marianne@...>
      To: Apicius@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Monday, November 19, 2012 2:46 PM
      Subject: [Apicius] roman herbs for garden


       
      Hello from a longtime lurker and perennial beginner,

      I'm looking to get herbs for my garden, as many I can't get easily where I
      live and it's really frustrating to hardly be able to try anything. One
      problem is when I run into one that I'm not sure how to translate (I live
      in Spain). Any idea what type of "mint" we're supposed to use? For example
      in Pork with Apple (Minutal Matianum) in "The Classical Cookbook" by A
      Dalby and Sally Grainger?

      Also what herbs do you find useful? My list so far is:
      - celery
      - lovage
      - caraway
      - coriander
      - pennyroyal
      - winter savory
      - "mint" (I have Mentha spicata, spearmint)

      Also, any suggestions for a second book on Roman Cooking?

      Thanks!

      Salvete,

      Marianne

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • lilinah@earthlink.net
      ... Spearmint is good. I don t know about in Spain, but in the US we tend to prefer peppermint. HOWEVER, peppermint, from what i ve read, is a comparatively
      Message 2 of 9 , Nov 19, 2012
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        Marianne wrote:
        > ...Any idea what type of "mint" we're supposed to use? For example
        > in Pork with Apple (Minutal Matianum) in "The Classical Cookbook" by A
        > Dalby and Sally Grainger?
        >
        > - "mint" (I have Mentha spicata, spearmint)

        Spearmint is good.

        I don't know about in Spain, but in the US we tend to prefer peppermint. HOWEVER, peppermint, from what i've read, is a comparatively recent hybrid and unlikely to have been used more than about 400 years ago. Spearmint has a very long history, so it's a likely mint to use in Roman cooking.

        Anahita
      • Lucia Clark
        Hi Marianne I have an interesting book, Ancient Roman Gardens by Linda Farrar, published by Haynes & Co, 1998 in Great Britain. It is very informative with
        Message 3 of 9 , Nov 21, 2012
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          Hi Marianne
          I have an interesting book, "Ancient Roman Gardens" by Linda Farrar,
          published by Haynes & Co, 1998 in Great Britain. It is very informative with
          beautiful illustrations of gardens from Pompeii, Italy and England. So off
          hand I would add mustard, capers, rue and fennel. As for the mint, see if
          you can find the "mentuccia", the Roman mint. You are lucky to live in a
          gentle climate!
          Lucia

          -----Original Message-----
          From: Apicius@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Apicius@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
          Justin Mansfield
          Sent: Monday, November 19, 2012 4:42 PM
          To: Apicius@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [Apicius] roman herbs for garden

          Iustinus Mariannae salutem plurimam dicit!

          Welcome. I love how you formatted your list of herbs from shortest to
          longest.

          According to André menta refers to several species of the genus *Mentha*,
          but I generally use Mentha spicata as well.

          Vale

          On Mon, Nov 19, 2012 at 2:46 PM, Marianne Perdomo <marianne@...
          > wrote:

          > **
          >
          >
          > Hello from a longtime lurker and perennial beginner,
          >
          > I'm looking to get herbs for my garden, as many I can't get easily where I
          > live and it's really frustrating to hardly be able to try anything. One
          > problem is when I run into one that I'm not sure how to translate (I live
          > in Spain). Any idea what type of "mint" we're supposed to use? For example
          > in Pork with Apple (Minutal Matianum) in "The Classical Cookbook" by A
          > Dalby and Sally Grainger?
          >
          > Also what herbs do you find useful? My list so far is:
          > - celery
          > - lovage
          > - caraway
          > - coriander
          > - pennyroyal
          > - winter savory
          > - "mint" (I have Mentha spicata, spearmint)
          >
          > Also, any suggestions for a second book on Roman Cooking?
          >
          > Thanks!
          >
          > Salvete,
          >
          > Marianne
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



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        • Correus
          That is an excelent book as well! Anything by Wilhelmina Mary Feemster Jashemski as well - she has a book called A Pompeian Herbal: Ancient and Modern
          Message 4 of 9 , Nov 21, 2012
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            That is an excelent book as well!

            Anything by Wilhelmina Mary Feemster Jashemski as well - she has a book called "A Pompeian Herbal: Ancient and Modern Medicinal Plants".

            A word of caution about the Rue - it is an abortive and some tend to be allergic to it so use with caution.  Also, if you use it - I do - use it sparingly!!  It tends to be a bit bitter and too much will ruin the dish.  When I use it a use no more than a pinch if that.

            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ruta_graveolens

            Vale!

            CORREVS·APPIVS·IVLIANVS·APICIVS




            ________________________________
            From: Lucia Clark <luciaclark@...>
            To: Apicius@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Wednesday, November 21, 2012 4:27 PM
            Subject: RE: [Apicius] roman herbs for garden


             
            Hi Marianne
            I have an interesting book, "Ancient Roman Gardens" by Linda Farrar,
            published by Haynes & Co, 1998 in Great Britain. It is very informative with
            beautiful illustrations of gardens from Pompeii, Italy and England. So off
            hand I would add mustard, capers, rue and fennel. As for the mint, see if
            you can find the "mentuccia", the Roman mint. You are lucky to live in a
            gentle climate!
            Lucia

            -----Original Message-----
            From: Apicius@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Apicius@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
            Justin Mansfield
            Sent: Monday, November 19, 2012 4:42 PM
            To: Apicius@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [Apicius] roman herbs for garden

            Iustinus Mariannae salutem plurimam dicit!

            Welcome. I love how you formatted your list of herbs from shortest to
            longest.

            According to André menta refers to several species of the genus *Mentha*,
            but I generally use Mentha spicata as well.

            Vale

            On Mon, Nov 19, 2012 at 2:46 PM, Marianne Perdomo <marianne@...
            > wrote:

            > **
            >
            >
            > Hello from a longtime lurker and perennial beginner,
            >
            > I'm looking to get herbs for my garden, as many I can't get easily where I
            > live and it's really frustrating to hardly be able to try anything. One
            > problem is when I run into one that I'm not sure how to translate (I live
            > in Spain). Any idea what type of "mint" we're supposed to use? For example
            > in Pork with Apple (Minutal Matianum) in "The Classical Cookbook" by A
            > Dalby and Sally Grainger?
            >
            > Also what herbs do you find useful? My list so far is:
            > - celery
            > - lovage
            > - caraway
            > - coriander
            > - pennyroyal
            > - winter savory
            > - "mint" (I have Mentha spicata, spearmint)
            >
            > Also, any suggestions for a second book on Roman Cooking?
            >
            > Thanks!
            >
            > Salvete,
            >
            > Marianne
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
            >

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

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            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Marianne Perdomo
            Hello everyone! Many thanks!! Spearmint is very common in local cooking, so very I m glad to know it s a logical choice. As to mentuccia, it seems there are
            Message 5 of 9 , Nov 22, 2012
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              Hello everyone!

              Many thanks!!

              Spearmint is very common in local cooking, so very I'm glad to know it's a
              logical choice.
              As to mentuccia, it seems there are two plants that go by that name:

              - *Calamintha nepeta <http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calamintha_nepeta>* o
              *nepetella *--> Lesser calaminth*
              *
              - *Mentha pulegium <http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mentha_pulegium>* o *
              puleggio* (Roma <http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roma> e
              Lazio<http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lazio>)
              --> pennyroyal

              See http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mentuccia
              Which of the two would it be, Lucia?

              Justin :D I never noticed I ordered them that way. The whole mint family
              can be very confusing.

              Thanks also for the websites and book suggestions! I have there enough to
              keep me busy for a while :)

              Thank you! Valete!


              Marianne


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Justin Mansfield
              Iustinus Mariannae et ceteris sal plur, On Thu, Nov 22, 2012 at 5:11 PM, Marianne Perdomo
              Message 6 of 9 , Nov 22, 2012
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                Iustinus Mariannae et ceteris sal plur,

                On Thu, Nov 22, 2012 at 5:11 PM, Marianne Perdomo <marianne@...
                > wrote:

                >
                > - *Calamintha nepeta <http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calamintha_nepeta>* o
                > *nepetella *--> Lesser calaminth*
                > - *Mentha pulegium <http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mentha_pulegium>* o
                > *puleggio* (Roma <http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roma> e Lazio<
                > http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lazio>) --> pennyroyal
                >
                Mentha pulegium is of course just pulegium in Latin (sometimes spelled
                puleium). Also called by its Greek name, glechon.

                Calamintha nepeta has several Roman names, according to André:

                - "menta agrestis" ('wild mint')
                - "puleium silvestre" ('wild pennyroyal')
                - "nepeta" (usually translated 'catnip')
                - "calamintha" ('calamint')


                Vale & valete


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Lucia Clark
                Hi Marianne Definitely Mentha Pulegium. In Italy it s called Mentuccia Romana , and grows wild a bit everywhere. Have fun! Lucia _____ From:
                Message 7 of 9 , Nov 23, 2012
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                  Hi Marianne

                  Definitely Mentha Pulegium. In Italy it's called "Mentuccia Romana", and
                  grows wild a bit everywhere.

                  Have fun!

                  Lucia



                  _____

                  From: Apicius@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Apicius@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
                  Marianne Perdomo
                  Sent: Thursday, November 22, 2012 5:11 PM
                  To: Apicius@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: Re: [Apicius] roman herbs for garden





                  Hello everyone!

                  Many thanks!!

                  Spearmint is very common in local cooking, so very I'm glad to know it's a
                  logical choice.
                  As to mentuccia, it seems there are two plants that go by that name:

                  - *Calamintha nepeta <http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calamintha_nepeta>* o
                  *nepetella *--> Lesser calaminth*
                  *
                  - *Mentha pulegium <http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mentha_pulegium>* o *
                  puleggio* (Roma <http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roma> e
                  Lazio<http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lazio>)
                  --> pennyroyal

                  See http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mentuccia
                  Which of the two would it be, Lucia?

                  Justin :D I never noticed I ordered them that way. The whole mint family
                  can be very confusing.

                  Thanks also for the websites and book suggestions! I have there enough to
                  keep me busy for a while :)

                  Thank you! Valete!

                  Marianne

                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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