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Preserving Quinces

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  • Aurelia Rufinia
    Ave! I am going to be doing a Roman feast in February, and given that right now is the season for quinces, I was thinking about preserving some quinces ala
    Message 1 of 5 , Sep 4, 2012
      Ave!

      I am going to be doing a Roman feast in February, and given that right now
      is the season for quinces, I was thinking about preserving some quinces ala
      Apicius in honey and defrutum.

      Has anyone done this? Tips? Giant red flags that I totally should not do
      thing? should I put them in a canning jar and boil and seal them?

      Thanks!

      Rufinia


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Cristal Delamer
      Greetings Rufinia ;) I have not prepared quinces in this manner, but in my experience with preserving fruit I find that cooking the fruit a bit prior to
      Message 2 of 5 , Sep 5, 2012
        Greetings Rufinia ;)

        I have not prepared quinces in this manner, but in my experience with
        preserving fruit I find that cooking the fruit a bit prior to canning works
        best for preservation. You can prepare them exactly as it's written, but I
        think you'd have a better end result if you took a slightly more modern
        approach and peeled and cooked the quinces first in the honey and defrutum,
        then canned them. At the very least you will need to seal and boil the
        jars.

        If I were entering an Arts competition I would use the Apicius method, but
        for a feast I would compromise and combine later period recipe with Apicius
        recipe.

        Just my opinion....

        Cristal

        On Tue, Sep 4, 2012 at 6:06 PM, Aurelia Rufinia
        <baronessrufinia@...>wrote:

        > **
        >
        >
        > Ave!
        >
        > I am going to be doing a Roman feast in February, and given that right now
        > is the season for quinces, I was thinking about preserving some quinces ala
        > Apicius in honey and defrutum.
        >
        > Has anyone done this? Tips? Giant red flags that I totally should not do
        > thing? should I put them in a canning jar and boil and seal them?
        >
        > Thanks!
        >
        > Rufinia
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >



        --
        ~Cristal

        *domum coquus est numquam esurientem amicitiae*
        ~A cook's home is never hungry for friendship~


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Justin Mansfield
        Iustinus Rufiniae gregalibusque sal plur I have really been getting into the numerous preserve recipes that have been, er... preserved in our sources.
        Message 3 of 5 , Sep 5, 2012
          Iustinus Rufiniae gregalibusque sal plur

          I have really been getting into the numerous "preserve" recipes that have
          been, er... preserved in our sources. Canning is, of course, a modern
          technique, and I suspect the Romans did not even have ceramics strong
          enough to hold a still-boiling liquid (but those of you who know more about
          pottery may feel free to correct me).

          That said, when I have prepared these recipes, I have generally done it
          "canning" style nevertheless, for the same reasons Cristal gives: 1)
          Safety´┐Żgenerally the liquids given in the ancient recipes are in themselves
          preservative, but I don't want to risk it if I'm going to be storing the
          items long term 2) Cooking´┐Żboiling the item to be preserved in the liquid
          generally improves the taste and texture. As I say above, this is surely
          not authentic, and I know Kevin for one wishes I wouldn't do it.

          Both honey and defrutum should in themselves be reasonably good
          preservatives, but as with other recipes I worry that mixing two
          preservatives might decrease the effectiveness of both.



          On Wed, Sep 5, 2012 at 12:51 PM, Cristal Delamer
          <cristaldelamer@...>wrote:

          > Greetings Rufinia ;)
          >
          > I have not prepared quinces in this manner, but in my experience with
          > preserving fruit I find that cooking the fruit a bit prior to canning works
          > best for preservation. You can prepare them exactly as it's written, but I
          > think you'd have a better end result if you took a slightly more modern
          > approach and peeled and cooked the quinces first in the honey and defrutum,
          > then canned them. At the very least you will need to seal and boil the
          > jars.
          >
          > If I were entering an Arts competition I would use the Apicius method, but
          > for a feast I would compromise and combine later period recipe with Apicius
          > recipe.
          >
          > Just my opinion....
          >
          > Cristal
          >
          > On Tue, Sep 4, 2012 at 6:06 PM, Aurelia Rufinia
          > <baronessrufinia@...>wrote:
          >
          > > **
          > >
          > >
          > > Ave!
          > >
          > > I am going to be doing a Roman feast in February, and given that right
          > now
          > > is the season for quinces, I was thinking about preserving some quinces
          > ala
          > > Apicius in honey and defrutum.
          > >
          > > Has anyone done this? Tips? Giant red flags that I totally should not do
          > > thing? should I put them in a canning jar and boil and seal them?
          > >
          > > Thanks!
          > >
          > > Rufinia
          > >
          > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          > >
          > >
          > >
          >
          >
          >
          > --
          > ~Cristal
          >
          > *domum coquus est numquam esurientem amicitiae*
          > ~A cook's home is never hungry for friendship~
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >
          > ------------------------------------
          >
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          >
          >
          >
          >


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • hail_isis
          The quince preserves are simple. you can add a little bit of water to help it boil/simmer. If you have a hard time getting defrutum, a sweet vinegar might be
          Message 4 of 5 , Sep 5, 2012
            The quince preserves are simple. you can add a little bit of water to
            help it boil/simmer.

            If you have a hard time getting defrutum, a sweet vinegar might be able
            to be used (lemon being an Asian import),
            but you must taste everything to be sure that the flavors are
            compatible for you & your guests. There are several grades
            of balsamic vinegar - I use three or four different balsamics with
            slightly different viscosity in each. The most expensive
            balsamic vinegar that I use is the Ariston brand. it is so mellow that
            it almost suggests a sweet or dessert type dish.
            Ariston Specialties LLC can be found at : www.aristonoliveoil.com

            this site created by a SCA aficionado has a quince page, under 'fruit'
            in the food list on the left hand menu.
            http://www.florilegium.org/

            Here is a modern Greek quince preserve/jelly that could have been made
            in olden days. The only 'new' ingredient is nutmeg,
            so you might have to find a spice that made its way west to Roma from
            the Silk Road:
            http://greekfood.about.com/od/candy/r/kydonopasto.htm

            This Uzbek recipe may be fun to try. It is a fresh preparation.
            it is from Sultanas Palate :
            http://sultanaspalate.blogspot.com/2007/12/baked-honey-quince-uzbek-styl\
            e.html

            Have Fun!
            Demetria

            "They dined on mince, and slices of quince,
            Which they ate with a runcible spoon;
            And hand in hand, on the edge of the sand,
            They danced by the light of the moon,
            The moon,
            The moon,
            They danced by the light of the moon." Edward Lear, The Owl & the
            Pussycat



            --- In Apicius@yahoogroups.com, Aurelia Rufinia <baronessrufinia@...>
            wrote:
            >
            > Ave!
            >
            > I am going to be doing a Roman feast in February, and given that right
            now
            > is the season for quinces, I was thinking about preserving some
            quinces ala
            > Apicius in honey and defrutum.
            >
            > Has anyone done this? Tips? Giant red flags that I totally should
            not do
            > thing? should I put them in a canning jar and boil and seal them?
            >
            > Thanks!
            >
            > Rufinia
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >



            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • lilinah@earthlink.net
            ... Sounds lovely. It might be gilding the lily, err, quince, but i d add some saffron to the honey - soak saffron threads in a tiny bit of warm water for at
            Message 5 of 5 , Sep 5, 2012
              Demetria wrote:
              > This Uzbek recipe may be fun to try. It is a fresh preparation.
              > it is from Sultanas Palate :
              > http://sultanaspalate.blogspot.com/2007/12/baked-honey-quince-uzbek-style.html

              Sounds lovely. It might be gilding the lily, err, quince, but i'd add some saffron to the honey - soak saffron threads in a tiny bit of warm water for at least 15 min., then stir into the honey.

              Anahita
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