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RE: [Apicius] Re: Wine & Pottery Questions OT

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  • Lucia Clark
    I also put a few shards in the bottom of my flower-and herbs- pots. About gluing, there is a great novel by Luigi Pirandello, La Giara (the clay urn) about a
    Message 1 of 17 , Jun 18, 2011
      I also put a few shards in the bottom of my flower-and herbs- pots. About
      gluing, there is a great novel by Luigi Pirandello, La Giara (the clay urn)
      about a greedy landowner that insists that his great, broken urn (used to
      hold olives) be mended with glue AND lead ties. The artisan in charge of it
      has to do the mending from the inside, and of course gets stuck. The
      landowner refuses permission to break the urn. Great story.



      _____

      From: Apicius@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Apicius@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
      Phoenix
      Sent: Saturday, June 18, 2011 1:47 PM
      To: Apicius@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [Apicius] Re: Wine & Pottery Questions







      Ostraka are good in the garden to help aerate clay heavy soil.
      I also use them (modern shards!) when potting plants for aeration
      and easy watering. When we were kids, we used pieces that were not
      sharp-edged to build camps for our toy soldiers and animals, or to make
      little fences for flowers.

      There are a few concrete and brick/masonry fences in Chicago that
      incorporate beach glass, pottery shards, and bottlecaps in their walls. They
      are fun and interesting to look at.

      of course, gluing the pieces back together is another use for ostraka!

      Wishing all a gorgeous June weekend,
      Demetria

      --- In Apicius@yahoogroups.com <mailto:Apicius%40yahoogroups.com> , "Lucia
      Clark" <luciaclark@...> wrote:
      >
      > Ostraca notwithstanding
      >
      >
      >
      > _____
      >
      > From: Apicius@yahoogroups.com <mailto:Apicius%40yahoogroups.com>
      [mailto:Apicius@yahoogroups.com <mailto:Apicius%40yahoogroups.com> ] On
      Behalf Of
      > jdm314@...
      > Sent: Saturday, June 18, 2011 11:43 AM
      > To: Apicius@yahoogroups.com <mailto:Apicius%40yahoogroups.com>
      > Subject: Re: [Apicius] Re: Wine & Pottery Questions
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > > I also have quite a number of Julia's pieces; I've never broken any of
      > them and (frankly) I wouldn't be put off by this
      > > comment. Pottery is by nature breakable and now and then a piece
      will--and
      > did--break. This is part of the game.
      > > Reasonable care will avoid the problem in my experience.
      > >
      > > If a piece DOES break...it is worth remembering (for those who do this
      > stuff in a reenactment sense) ...
      >
      > Also, don't forget, that if your pottery breaks, you should save all the
      > pieces and use them to jot notes on ;)
      >
      > > SVVM QVIQVE...__,_
      > Ahem, SVVM CVIQVE. The c vs. q there is actually important. I could
      explain
      > in more detail, but it's not that relevant to the group ;)
      >
      > JDM_,___
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Ancient Soul
      Kevin and Kristin, thank you both so much for your kind words, I am deeply touched, truly. : ) RE:fragility: They are no more fragile than a terra cotta
      Message 2 of 17 , Jun 19, 2011
        Kevin and Kristin, thank you both so much for your kind words, I am deeply touched, truly. : )

        RE:fragility: They are no more fragile than a terra cotta flower pot. Use lots of bubblewrap when transporting, and you'll have NO problem. Wren and Julie of LaWren's Nest (BEST Roman garb ever!) toted hundreds of dollars worth of my wares all around the country for almost 3 years. They chipped only one cup in that whole time!

        RE tinkering service: actually, my husband Dino puts a sort of iron wire netting on cookware to PREVENT breakeage. The idea is that the metal conducts heat more evenly to lengthen the life of the pot. Once the pot is broken, one can use CA or epoxy, but if it's cookware, I am afraid that it would be destined for the bottom Lucias flower pots, or to make cool encampments with toy soldiers. LOL

        Magna Gratias,
        Julia
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