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  • jdm314@aol.com
    My friend Adam Bishop just posted a link to this article on Facebook: http://www.torontosun.com/news/world/2010/12/13/16533796.html This is short enough to
    Message 1 of 5 , Dec 13, 2010
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      My friend Adam Bishop just posted a link to this article on Facebook: http://www.torontosun.com/news/world/2010/12/13/16533796.html


      This is short enough to paste here in its entirety:




      2,400-year-old pot of soup discovered in tomb

      By QMI AGENCY

      Last Updated: December 13, 2010 2:49pm


      A 2,400-year-old pot of bone soup was discovered in a tomb near the site of China's terracotta army in Xian.


      The soup is still liquid but no longer edible. A local newspaper quoted a representative from the Shaanxi Institute of Archaeology as saying it's the first example of bone soup in Chinese archaeological history.


      "The discovery will play an important role in studying the eating habits and culture of the warring states period," the source said.


      The occupant of the tomb is unknown.


      Scientists are analyzing the ingredients in the soup.


      It was customary in ancient China for the dead to be buried with food that would be needed in the next life.



      Adam comments: "‎'The soup is still liquid but no longer edible.' They got one of their grad students to try it, didn't they."






      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Lucia Clark
      No doubt, one of the lucky kids tried it. Actually I was assigned the article as a graduate assistant for my 101 Anthro class. We had a blast discussing it.
      Message 2 of 5 , Dec 14, 2010
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        No doubt, one of the lucky kids tried it. Actually I was assigned the
        article as a graduate assistant for my 101 Anthro class. We had a blast
        discussing it. Somewhere there is a related article regarding coffee. Try to
        described coffee as you never saw it before

        Lucia



        _____

        From: Apicius@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Apicius@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
        jdm314@...
        Sent: Monday, December 13, 2010 10:59 PM
        To: apicius@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [Apicius] ...and on that note





        My friend Adam Bishop just posted a link to this article on Facebook:
        http://www.torontosun.com/news/world/2010/12/13/16533796.html

        This is short enough to paste here in its entirety:

        2,400-year-old pot of soup discovered in tomb

        By QMI AGENCY

        Last Updated: December 13, 2010 2:49pm

        A 2,400-year-old pot of bone soup was discovered in a tomb near the site of
        China's terracotta army in Xian.

        The soup is still liquid but no longer edible. A local newspaper quoted a
        representative from the Shaanxi Institute of Archaeology as saying it's the
        first example of bone soup in Chinese archaeological history.

        "The discovery will play an important role in studying the eating habits and
        culture of the warring states period," the source said.

        The occupant of the tomb is unknown.

        Scientists are analyzing the ingredients in the soup.

        It was customary in ancient China for the dead to be buried with food that
        would be needed in the next life.

        Adam comments: "�'The soup is still liquid but no longer edible.' They got
        one of their grad students to try it, didn't they."

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Lucia Clark
        Ok, I meant describe ... From: Apicius@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Apicius@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Lucia Clark Sent: Tuesday, December 14, 2010 9:33 AM To:
        Message 3 of 5 , Dec 14, 2010
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          Ok, I meant describe


          -----Original Message-----
          From: Apicius@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Apicius@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
          Lucia Clark
          Sent: Tuesday, December 14, 2010 9:33 AM
          To: Apicius@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: RE: [Apicius] ...and on that note

          No doubt, one of the lucky kids tried it. Actually I was assigned the
          article as a graduate assistant for my 101 Anthro class. We had a blast
          discussing it. Somewhere there is a related article regarding coffee. Try to
          described coffee as you never saw it before

          Lucia



          _____

          From: Apicius@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Apicius@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
          jdm314@...
          Sent: Monday, December 13, 2010 10:59 PM
          To: apicius@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [Apicius] ...and on that note





          My friend Adam Bishop just posted a link to this article on Facebook:
          http://www.torontosun.com/news/world/2010/12/13/16533796.html

          This is short enough to paste here in its entirety:

          2,400-year-old pot of soup discovered in tomb

          By QMI AGENCY

          Last Updated: December 13, 2010 2:49pm

          A 2,400-year-old pot of bone soup was discovered in a tomb near the site of
          China's terracotta army in Xian.

          The soup is still liquid but no longer edible. A local newspaper quoted a
          representative from the Shaanxi Institute of Archaeology as saying it's the
          first example of bone soup in Chinese archaeological history.

          "The discovery will play an important role in studying the eating habits and
          culture of the warring states period," the source said.

          The occupant of the tomb is unknown.

          Scientists are analyzing the ingredients in the soup.

          It was customary in ancient China for the dead to be buried with food that
          would be needed in the next life.

          Adam comments: "ý'The soup is still liquid but no longer edible.' They got
          one of their grad students to try it, didn't they."

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



          ------------------------------------

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        • jdm314@aol.com
          You mean you were assigned the Nacarima article, right? Surely not this one. And I should have been more careful to indicate where the article began and ended
          Message 4 of 5 , Dec 14, 2010
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            You mean you were assigned the Nacarima article, right? Surely not this one.


            And I should have been more careful to indicate where the article began and ended (I indented it, but yahoogroups strips most formatting): in case it wasn't obvious, Adam's comment was not part of the article!





            -----Original Message-----
            From: Lucia Clark <luciaclark@...>
            To: Apicius@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Tue, Dec 14, 2010 8:32 am
            Subject: RE: [Apicius] ...and on that note


            No doubt, one of the lucky kids tried it. Actually I was assigned the
            article as a graduate assistant for my 101 Anthro class. We had a blast
            discussing it. Somewhere there is a related article regarding coffee. Try to
            described coffee as you never saw it before

            Lucia



            _____

            From: Apicius@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Apicius@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
            jdm314@...
            Sent: Monday, December 13, 2010 10:59 PM
            To: apicius@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [Apicius] ...and on that note





            My friend Adam Bishop just posted a link to this article on Facebook:
            http://www.torontosun.com/news/world/2010/12/13/16533796.html

            This is short enough to paste here in its entirety:

            2,400-year-old pot of soup discovered in tomb

            By QMI AGENCY

            Last Updated: December 13, 2010 2:49pm

            A 2,400-year-old pot of bone soup was discovered in a tomb near the site of
            China's terracotta army in Xian.

            The soup is still liquid but no longer edible. A local newspaper quoted a
            representative from the Shaanxi Institute of Archaeology as saying it's the
            first example of bone soup in Chinese archaeological history.

            "The discovery will play an important role in studying the eating habits and
            culture of the warring states period," the source said.

            The occupant of the tomb is unknown.

            Scientists are analyzing the ingredients in the soup.

            It was customary in ancient China for the dead to be buried with food that
            would be needed in the next life.

            Adam comments: "ý'The soup is still liquid but no longer edible.' They got
            one of their grad students to try it, didn't they."

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



            ------------------------------------

            Post message: Apicius@yahoogroups.com
            Unsubscribe: Apicius-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
            List owner: Apicius-owner@yahoogroups.com
            Yahoo! Groups Links






            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Lucia Clark
            Yes, the Nacirema was in the reading list of the class I was teaching _____ From: Apicius@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Apicius@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
            Message 5 of 5 , Dec 14, 2010
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              Yes, the Nacirema was in the reading list of the class I was teaching



              _____

              From: Apicius@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Apicius@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
              jdm314@...
              Sent: Tuesday, December 14, 2010 12:03 PM
              To: Apicius@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Re: [Apicius] ...and on that note





              You mean you were assigned the Nacarima article, right? Surely not this one.

              And I should have been more careful to indicate where the article began and
              ended (I indented it, but yahoogroups strips most formatting): in case it
              wasn't obvious, Adam's comment was not part of the article!

              -----Original Message-----
              From: Lucia Clark <luciaclark@...
              <mailto:luciaclark%40luciadentice.com> >
              To: Apicius@yahoogroups.com <mailto:Apicius%40yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Tue, Dec 14, 2010 8:32 am
              Subject: RE: [Apicius] ...and on that note

              No doubt, one of the lucky kids tried it. Actually I was assigned the
              article as a graduate assistant for my 101 Anthro class. We had a blast
              discussing it. Somewhere there is a related article regarding coffee. Try to
              described coffee as you never saw it before

              Lucia

              _____

              From: Apicius@yahoogroups.com <mailto:Apicius%40yahoogroups.com>
              [mailto:Apicius@yahoogroups.com <mailto:Apicius%40yahoogroups.com> ] On
              Behalf Of
              jdm314@... <mailto:jdm314%40aol.com>
              Sent: Monday, December 13, 2010 10:59 PM
              To: apicius@yahoogroups.com <mailto:apicius%40yahoogroups.com>
              Subject: [Apicius] ...and on that note

              My friend Adam Bishop just posted a link to this article on Facebook:
              http://www.torontosun.com/news/world/2010/12/13/16533796.html

              This is short enough to paste here in its entirety:

              2,400-year-old pot of soup discovered in tomb

              By QMI AGENCY

              Last Updated: December 13, 2010 2:49pm

              A 2,400-year-old pot of bone soup was discovered in a tomb near the site of
              China's terracotta army in Xian.

              The soup is still liquid but no longer edible. A local newspaper quoted a
              representative from the Shaanxi Institute of Archaeology as saying it's the
              first example of bone soup in Chinese archaeological history.

              "The discovery will play an important role in studying the eating habits and
              culture of the warring states period," the source said.

              The occupant of the tomb is unknown.

              Scientists are analyzing the ingredients in the soup.

              It was customary in ancient China for the dead to be buried with food that
              would be needed in the next life.

              Adam comments: "ý'The soup is still liquid but no longer edible.' They got
              one of their grad students to try it, didn't they."

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

              ------------------------------------

              Post message: Apicius@yahoogroups.com <mailto:Apicius%40yahoogroups.com>
              Unsubscribe: Apicius-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
              <mailto:Apicius-unsubscribe%40yahoogroups.com>
              List owner: Apicius-owner@yahoogroups.com
              <mailto:Apicius-owner%40yahoogroups.com>
              Yahoo! Groups Links

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





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