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Toasted Salt

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  • tomasia_da_colliventoso
    Greetings I am currently working on redacting a recipe from Columella s Husbandry in Twelve Books . I am using a translation from 1745. The recipe calls for
    Message 1 of 3 , Apr 6, 2009
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      Greetings

      I am currently working on redacting a recipe from Columella's "Husbandry in Twelve Books". I am using a translation from 1745. The recipe calls for toasted and bruised salt. This is not a term I have come across before. Does anyone have any ideas? To me logically, it would seem that if I heat it to toast it, it would melt...but I know that they would not be using standard table salt, so could it be rock salt like for ice cream making or kosher salt perhaps? Or is it just a mis-translation? The term actually appears several times in other receipts.

      Any help would be greatfully appreciated.

      Ciao,
      Maestra Tomasia da Collivento
      Kingdom of Aethelmearc
    • Alicia Roberts
      I know that in some Chinese recipes they use a toasted salt and pepper mix, which involves stir frying the dry condiments in a hot wok....though I always
      Message 2 of 3 , Apr 7, 2009
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        I know that in some Chinese recipes they use a toasted salt and pepper mix, which involves stir frying the dry condiments in a hot wok....though I always thought the idea was to release the flavour of the peppercorns....?


        To: Apicius@yahoogroups.com
        From: threecs@...
        Date: Tue, 7 Apr 2009 03:02:54 +0000
        Subject: [Apicius] Toasted Salt





        Greetings

        I am currently working on redacting a recipe from Columella's "Husbandry in Twelve Books". I am using a translation from 1745. The recipe calls for toasted and bruised salt. This is not a term I have come across before. Does anyone have any ideas? To me logically, it would seem that if I heat it to toast it, it would melt...but I know that they would not be using standard table salt, so could it be rock salt like for ice cream making or kosher salt perhaps? Or is it just a mis-translation? The term actually appears several times in other receipts.

        Any help would be greatfully appreciated.

        Ciao,
        Maestra Tomasia da Collivento
        Kingdom of Aethelmearc









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      • RM
        Salve! I don t know which recipe are you exactly talking about but in culinary Latin there is a problem that often the participes of the verbs fricare (=to
        Message 3 of 3 , Apr 7, 2009
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          Salve!

          I don't know which recipe are you exactly talking about but in culinary Latin there is a problem that often the participes of the verbs fricare (=to grind / bruise) and frigere (=to toast) look similar or identical, e.g. in the sentence "nauseantibus quoque salutaris habetur eburnea scobis sali fricto et fabae minute fresae conmixta ieiunisque prius quam in pascua prodeant obiecta." (Col. RR 7, 10, 4) the "sali fricto" does actually mean the same as "sali fricato" = grinded salt.

          Best regards

          RM


          ----- Original Message -----
          From: tomasia_da_colliventoso
          To: Apicius@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Tuesday, April 07, 2009 5:02 AM
          Subject: [Apicius] Toasted Salt


          Greetings

          I am currently working on redacting a recipe from Columella's "Husbandry in Twelve Books". I am using a translation from 1745. The recipe calls for toasted and bruised salt. This is not a term I have come across before. Does anyone have any ideas? To me logically, it would seem that if I heat it to toast it, it would melt...but I know that they would not be using standard table salt, so could it be rock salt like for ice cream making or kosher salt perhaps? Or is it just a mis-translation? The term actually appears several times in other receipts.

          Any help would be greatfully appreciated.

          Ciao,
          Maestra Tomasia da Collivento
          Kingdom of Aethelmearc




          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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