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Apicius 6.8.1

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  • Castus Valerius
    Hi All, I recently bought a copy of Cooking Apicius and am making one of the recipies out of it for a cooking competition where the required ingredient is
    Message 1 of 7 , Dec 6, 2008
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      Hi All,

      I recently bought a copy of "Cooking Apicius" and am making one of the
      recipies out of it for a cooking competition where the required
      ingredient is Asafoetida.

      I have the original latin text but I require a translation. Silly me it
      was sitting right in front of my face when I was copying the latin, but
      I didn't write down the english version.

      Does anybody have a translation of the latin? Unfortunately there
      wasn't one included in the book I purchased. I might be able to
      decipher it but of course... I waited to the last minute to do my
      paperwork portion. :(

      If you can help, awesome... I appreciate it. If not, thanks for taking
      the time to read this anyway. :)

      Dennis
    • bonho1962
      Hello Dennis, you can fin an English version at http://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/E/Roman/Texts/Apicius/6*.html#236 note1 Have fun with the cooking, Rainer
      Message 2 of 7 , Dec 7, 2008
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        Hello Dennis,

        you can fin an English version at

        http://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/E/Roman/Texts/Apicius/6*.html#236
        note1

        Have fun with the cooking,

        Rainer


        --- In Apicius@yahoogroups.com, "Castus Valerius" <drseuss620@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > Hi All,
        >
        > I recently bought a copy of "Cooking Apicius" and am making one of
        the
        > recipies out of it for a cooking competition where the required
        > ingredient is Asafoetida.
        >
        > I have the original latin text but I require a translation. Silly
        me it
        > was sitting right in front of my face when I was copying the
        latin, but
        > I didn't write down the english version.
        >
        > Does anybody have a translation of the latin? Unfortunately there
        > wasn't one included in the book I purchased. I might be able to
        > decipher it but of course... I waited to the last minute to do my
        > paperwork portion. :(
        >
        > If you can help, awesome... I appreciate it. If not, thanks for
        taking
        > the time to read this anyway. :)
        >
        > Dennis
        >
      • RM
        In many editions this recipe is 6.9.1 (not 6.8.1). It is very similar to 7.6.13 where you can find even pepper and honey. RM [Non-text portions of this message
        Message 3 of 7 , Dec 7, 2008
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          In many editions this recipe is 6.9.1 (not 6.8.1).
          It is very similar to 7.6.13 where you can find even pepper and honey.

          RM

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Samia al-Kaslaania
          Asofoetida is Latin for putrid garlic . :) That is the name of the spice though, I ve bought it at a grocery co-op in Minneapolis. There is nothing else like
          Message 4 of 7 , Dec 7, 2008
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            Asofoetida is Latin for "putrid garlic" . :) That is the name of the
            spice though, I've bought it at a grocery co-op in Minneapolis. There is
            nothing else like it. It's almost garlic, but not quite fennel and quite
            pungent. The cat who inspects everything ran away from it.

            You should be able to order some from an online resource. It's still
            used in Indian cuisine today.

            Samia

            Castus Valerius wrote:
            > Hi All,
            >
            > I recently bought a copy of "Cooking Apicius" and am making one of the
            > recipies out of it for a cooking competition where the required
            > ingredient is Asafoetida.
          • Jim Van Kollenburg
            ... There is ... quite ... It is easily available at any Indian grocery, if you live in a big city. The product may be labelled as Hing. Sometimes the
            Message 5 of 7 , Dec 7, 2008
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              --- In Apicius@yahoogroups.com, Samia al-Kaslaania <samia@...> wrote:
              >
              > Asofoetida is Latin for "putrid garlic" . :) That is the name of the
              > spice though, I've bought it at a grocery co-op in Minneapolis.
              There is
              > nothing else like it. It's almost garlic, but not quite fennel and
              quite
              > pungent. The cat who inspects everything ran away from it.
              >
              > You should be able to order some from an online resource. It's still
              > used in Indian cuisine today.
              >

              It is easily available at any Indian grocery, if you live in a big
              city. The product may be labelled as "Hing." Sometimes the owners of
              these stores get confused when you ask for asafoetida. This product
              is usually cut with a variety of substances like wheat flour or even
              gum mastic.

              The Indians treasure it as an onion substitute (onions forbidden to
              strict Hindus)but also for its medicinal effect of helping with
              digestion and flatulence. Strangely enough, asafoetida must be fried
              in oil before eating or it causes diarrhea.

              You can buy pure asafoetida resin here:

              http://www.somaluna.com/prod/asafetida.asp?m=18

              Kallimachus
            • lilinah@earthlink.net
              ... SNIP Dennis probably already knows, and Sally definitely knows, but what is not clear from some of the other posts in this thread is: First, that laser is
              Message 6 of 7 , Dec 7, 2008
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                -----Original Message-----
                >From: Castus Valerius <drseuss620@...>
                >Sent: Dec 6, 2008 1:33 AM
                >
                >I recently bought a copy of "Cooking Apicius" and am making one of the
                >recipies out of it for a cooking competition where the required
                >ingredient is Asafoetida.
                SNIP

                Dennis probably already knows, and Sally definitely knows, but what is not clear from some of the other posts in this thread is: First, that laser is probably the same as silphium / silphion. Second, silphium unfortunately became extinct during the Roman Empire, during the reign of Nero. Third, it is believed to be in the same botanical family as asafoetida (based in part of Roman-period art depicting silphium), so asafoetida is now used as a substitute when we modern folks are cooking Apicius.

                For more on this spice - including names for it in various languages, photos, botanical info, history, etc. - i most highly recommend Gernot Katzer's Spice Pages
                http://www.uni-graz.at/~katzer/engl/Feru_ass.html

                This website is a wonderful source of information of herbs and spices and other botanical flavorings. Gernot says there are 117 currently listed.

                This link from his site has more good information on asafoetida (especially on the second page)
                [http://www.peppertrail.com/php/displayContent.php3?link_id=99&link_id_tmp=97&parent_link=10]

                Anahita
              • jdm314@aol.com
                Asofoetida is Latin for putrid garlic . :)  Just to be clear, Asafoetida or Assa foetida is not a Roman term, but a Neo-Latin one. Foetida does indeed
                Message 7 of 7 , Dec 7, 2008
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                  Asofoetida is Latin for "putrid garlic" . :) 
                  Just to be clear, "Asafoetida" or "Assa foetida" is not a Roman term, but a Neo-Latin one. Foetida does indeed mean "putrid," but what "assa" means is not entirely clear. Sally Grainger prefers the theory that it's a corruption of "lasar", another name for silphium, but another theory associates it with a Persian word for resin.




                  That is the name of the spice though,
                  The common English name for it is allegedly "Devil's Dung," but I have pretty much never heard that outside the phrase "its common name is 'Devil's Dung.'" Note that the common name in many other languages (possibly more "common" than the English equivalent) actually does translate to "devil's dung."

                  -----Original Message-----
                  From: Samia al-Kaslaania <samia@...>
                  To: Apicius@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Sun, 7 Dec 2008 6:58 am
                  Subject: Re: [Apicius] Apicius 6.8.1




























                  Asofoetida is Latin for "putrid garlic" . :) That is the name of the

                  spice though, I've bought it at a grocery co-op in Minneapolis. There is

                  nothing else like it. It's almost garlic, but not quite fennel and quite

                  pungent. The cat who inspects everything ran away from it.



                  You should be able to order some from an online resource. It's still

                  used in Indian cuisine today.



                  Samia



                  Castus Valerius wrote:

                  > Hi All,

                  >

                  > I recently bought a copy of "Cooking Apicius" and am making one of=2
                  0the

                  > recipies out of it for a cooking competition where the required

                  > ingredient is Asafoetida.

































                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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