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Spoons and Forks

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  • Hilary Cool
    I recall the group having some discussion about the use of forks in the Roman period some time ago. So you might like to know that David Sherlock has just
    Message 1 of 2 , Aug 23, 2008
      I recall the group having some discussion about the use of forks in the
      Roman period some time ago. So you might like to know that David
      Sherlock has just published an interesting article about the ones that
      he thinks can be taken as Roman because they share the same handle forms
      as Roman spoons. The problem always having been that so many are without
      secure Roman provenance. The article is a spin off from his work on
      Roman spoons, upon which he is an acknowledged expert. Remember that not
      all fork-shaped things functioned as culinary forks so he has got some
      items that might be netting needles. The reference is:-

      Sherlock, D. 2008. 'Roman forks', Archaeological Journal 164 (for 2007),
      249-67.

      My copy of the journal has just arrived so it might be a little while
      before it is in libraries for you to consult. As far as I'm aware the
      articles in this journal are not available on line.

      Best wishes,

      Hilary Cool


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • hvulic
      ... Just reminded me (sometimes brain works in mysterious ways), if you want forks and with secure Roman provenance you can see them in first picture from
      Message 2 of 2 , Aug 25, 2008
        --- In Apicius@yahoogroups.com, "Hilary Cool" <hilary.cool@...> wrote:
        >
        > I recall the group having some discussion about the use of forks in the
        > Roman period some time ago. So you might like to know that David
        > Sherlock has just published an interesting article about the ones that
        > he thinks can be taken as Roman because they share the same handle forms
        > as Roman spoons. The problem always having been that so many are without
        > secure Roman provenance. The article is a spin off from his work on
        > Roman spoons, upon which he is an acknowledged expert. Remember that not
        > all fork-shaped things functioned as culinary forks so he has got some
        > items that might be netting needles. The reference is:-
        >
        > Sherlock, D. 2008. 'Roman forks', Archaeological Journal 164 (for 2007),
        > 249-67.
        >
        > My copy of the journal has just arrived so it might be a little while
        > before it is in libraries for you to consult. As far as I'm aware the
        > articles in this journal are not available on line.
        >
        > Best wishes,
        >
        > Hilary Cool
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >


        Just reminded me (sometimes brain works in mysterious ways), if you
        want forks and with secure Roman provenance you can see them in first
        picture from scitarjevo posted here in album. They were found in a
        small roman place called Andautonia near Zagreb.
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