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Re: Wormwood and other herbs

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  • DONALD FISK
    ... According to the Absinthe FAQ (on the WWW somewhere, I forget the URL), the cause of absinthism was the high levels of alcohol in the drink rather than the
    Message 1 of 11 , Feb 1, 1999
      Kiwi Carlisle writes:

      > I agree with Margali that vermouth is a sensible substitute for
      > wine flavored with wormwood. I'd strongly advise you folks to
      > avoid putting wormwood in any food as a seasoning. It's
      > really toxic!! Go easy with the rue (many folks are allergic
      > to it) and the pennyroyal (don't feed to pregnant women) as
      > well.

      According to the Absinthe FAQ (on the WWW somewhere, I forget
      the URL), the cause of absinthism was the high levels of alcohol in
      the drink rather than the thujone in the wormwood. In any event,
      Absinthium Romanum had considerably less wormwood than the
      absinthe distilled by Pernod & Fils.

      I've made and drunk my own Absinthium Romanum, as well as
      using pennyroyal and rue in recipes with no ill effects. However
      there is one word of caution: I gave my son (then 2.5 years old)
      some rue to smell, and his upper lip blistered. The blisters remained
      for three weeks before completely healing. You should avoid contact
      with the skin in bright sunshine. More general advice is to avoid
      unusual herbs when pregnant.

      Le Hibou
    • Marilyn Traber
      It is used in folk medicine for that, so that was a good choice. You could substitute tarragon and a bare hint of asfoetida in that case. margali
      Message 2 of 11 , Feb 2, 1999
        It is used in folk medicine for that, so that was a good choice. You could
        substitute tarragon and a bare hint of asfoetida in that case.
        margali


        > Although I've also heard that the three herbs mentioned above can also
        > induce mensturation in *smaller* doses. Is this true? I left rue out of
        > a recipe because I'd heard that -- and I had a hemophiliac to feed....
        > Vesta
      • RIDGLEYJ@xxx.xxx
        In a message dated 2/1/99 10:14:43 AM Pacific Standard Time, CarlislC@psychiatry.wustl.edu writes:
        Message 3 of 11 , Feb 2, 1999
          In a message dated 2/1/99 10:14:43 AM Pacific Standard Time,
          CarlislC@... writes:

          << I'd strongly advise you folks to
          avoid putting wormwood in any food as a seasoning. >>
          Agreed!!!
          Wormwood is so called because used as a tea, it would devoid the body of
          parasites/worms. thus worm wood. It 'doesn't have worms in its wood.
          Therefore it is medicinal. Be careful.
          Judy
        • RIDGLEYJ@xxx.xxx
          In a message dated 2/1/99 11:34:45 AM Pacific Standard Time, petworth@suba.com writes:
          Message 4 of 11 , Feb 2, 1999
            In a message dated 2/1/99 11:34:45 AM Pacific Standard Time, petworth@...
            writes:

            << nyone tinkering with curious herbs would be well advised to keep a copy of
            Mrs. Grieve (the great 19c pharmaceutical encyclopaedist) at hand. Se's on
            the Net somewhere, also in Dovers. If anyone is interested, I have the refs
            since I have the book (2-vol.)
            >>
            Bill's absolutely right...you have to be careful with these things/herbs.
            Allergy's aren't the only problems here. Some are safe if you just use the
            leavesl some leaves are deadly. While the bulb may be fine another's bulb is
            poisonous. Flowers are fine but some aren't. And guess what...these can
            come from the same two plants. You can't cross em. Unless you really know
            what you're doing, stick with the tried and true...ie basil, garlic, thyme,
            etc
            Judy
          • Brian A French
            Prior to the discovery of hops wormwood was used in making beer. I find Rue somewhat toxic in that it destroys others plants in my herb garden. Perhaps this is
            Message 5 of 11 , Feb 4, 1999
              Prior to the discovery of hops wormwood was used in making beer. I find Rue
              somewhat toxic in that it destroys others plants in my herb garden. Perhaps
              this is partly due to the hot dry climate in Australia but provided it is
              kept separately all thrive reasonably well.

              In the 1980s I spent many happy hours collecting herbs in the mountains
              behind Assisi. More recently as part of my course on Roman Life I photocopy
              recipes from Apicius which my students (adult) recreate and bring along for
              a Roman banquet. The subltle blend of flavours has astounded and intrigued
              them.

              Pax et bonum,

              Brian
              -----Original Message-----
              From: DONALD FISK <hibou@...>
              To: Apicius@onelist.com <Apicius@onelist.com>
              Date: Wednesday, February 03, 1999 2:26 PM
              Subject: [Apicius] Re: Wormwood and other herbs


              >From: DONALD FISK <hibou@...>
              >
              >Kiwi Carlisle writes:
              >
              >> I agree with Margali that vermouth is a sensible substitute for
              >> wine flavored with wormwood. I'd strongly advise you folks to
              >> avoid putting wormwood in any food as a seasoning. It's
              >> really toxic!! Go easy with the rue (many folks are allergic
              >> to it) and the pennyroyal (don't feed to pregnant women) as
              >> well.
              >
              >According to the Absinthe FAQ (on the WWW somewhere, I forget
              >the URL), the cause of absinthism was the high levels of alcohol in
              >the drink rather than the thujone in the wormwood. In any event,
              >Absinthium Romanum had considerably less wormwood than the
              >absinthe distilled by Pernod & Fils.
              >
              >I've made and drunk my own Absinthium Romanum, as well as
              >using pennyroyal and rue in recipes with no ill effects. However
              >there is one word of caution: I gave my son (then 2.5 years old)
              >some rue to smell, and his upper lip blistered. The blisters remained
              >for three weeks before completely healing. You should avoid contact
              >with the skin in bright sunshine. More general advice is to avoid
              >unusual herbs when pregnant.
              >
              >Le Hibou
              >
              >
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