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Roman Wine creation

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  • Octavian Silvermoon
    Anyone on this list have practical re-creation information and/or references for how the Romans would have made wine? I am trying something out but would like
    Message 1 of 4 , Aug 4, 2008
      Anyone on this list have practical re-creation information and/or references
      for how the Romans would have made wine? I am trying something out but
      would like to be able to try to make it as Roman as possible...

      ~Octavian Silvermoon
    • Volker Bach
      If you read German, there is a book by Karl-Wilhelm Weeber dedicated to the subject of Roman wine. He goes into the processes and results in great detail. Some
      Message 2 of 4 , Aug 5, 2008
        If you read German, there is a book by Karl-Wilhelm Weeber dedicated to the subject of Roman wine. He goes into the processes and results in great detail. Some vintners in the German Rhineland (and other parts of Europe - I know of a project in Southern France, one in Tuscany and one in Austria and I'm sure there's more) make Roman wines the 'proper' way.

        If you want to do it 'right', you press the grapes in a masonry or pottery vat by stepping on them (wood is also possible, but far less common - archeologists can identify vineyards by the masonry pressing vats). Then you fill the resulting liquid into coarseware pottery containers lined with resin, pitch or oil and ferment it (again, wooden casks were known, but in very limited use). After the first pressing (calcare), you can squeeze the remnants in a wooden press for a second, lower quality must and even water it for a third pressing. These would be the cheaper varieties.

        Most Roman wine was drunk relatively young - the Vinalia Priora marked the opening of 'new' wine on April 23, and while some fine vintages were kept for a century or more, by that point much of last year's wine would have been consumed. Ideally, it was a dark 'white' (the amber colour of heavy white wines was highly esteemed) and probably quite rich and brut.

        Additives were legal and common, including various herbs, spices, honey, and seawater. You may not want to play with those since it's likely most Roman wines were 'as is' and only specific (marked-up) types were altered.

        K.W.Weeber: Die Weinkuiltur der Römer' can tell you everything you want to know.

        Vale

        Volker


        --- Octavian Silvermoon <octavian@...> schrieb am Di, 5.8.2008:

        > Von: Octavian Silvermoon <octavian@...>
        > Betreff: [Apicius] Roman Wine creation
        > An: apicius@yahoogroups.com
        > Datum: Dienstag, 5. August 2008, 7:50
        > Anyone on this list have practical re-creation information
        > and/or references
        > for how the Romans would have made wine? I am trying
        > something out but
        > would like to be able to try to make it as Roman as
        > possible...
        >
        > ~Octavian Silvermoon
        >
        >
        >
        > ------------------------------------
        >
        > Post message: Apicius@yahoogroups.com
        > Unsubscribe: Apicius-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
        > List owner: Apicius-owner@yahoogroups.com
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        >

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      • bonho1962
        Hello Octavian Silvermoon, there is a German article about a french scientist who tried out the roman wine making. His name is Jean-Pierre Brun
        Message 3 of 4 , Aug 5, 2008
          Hello Octavian Silvermoon,

          there is a German article about a french scientist who tried out the
          roman wine making. His name is Jean-Pierre Brun

          http://www.wissenschaft-online.de/artikel/830396

          You can find an article in English at

          http://gofrance.about.com/od/wineoffrance/a/romanwine.htm

          and maybe his vineyard, where he tried it:

          http://www.tourelles.com

          The French text goes into more detail than the English.

          Salve,

          Rainer :-)
        • Lucia Clark
          from my memories of my Vendemmie in Umbria, basic wine making has remained about the same, if one excludes the sea water or hellebore of Cato or the modern
          Message 4 of 4 , Aug 5, 2008
            from my memories of my Vendemmie in Umbria, basic
            wine making has remained about the same, if one
            excludes the sea water or hellebore of Cato or
            the modern additives. Huge pottery jars were used
            for the first pressing (by stomping with the feet
            and lots of singing), but the container of
            choice, when available, was made of Tufa, the
            volcanic rock where the vats were dug in the
            rock itself. Tufa kept the mustum at the right
            temperature for the first fermenting, the the
            mustum was drained in demijohns and allowed to
            age. Depending on how long this fermenting took
            place, you had the Vinello, young, low alcohol,
            refreshing wine, or more aged wines that were
            decanted in bottles, clay or glass, and allowed
            to mature. Lots depended on the weather. A rainy
            spring and a dry summer produced the perfect
            grapes, juicy and high in sugar content,
            necessary to ferment into alcohol. Cato,
            Columella and Pliny all write extensively on wine.
            Salute
            Lucia




            At 03:48 AM 8/5/2008, you wrote:

            >If you read German, there is a book by
            >Karl-Wilhelm Weeber dedicated to the subject of
            >Roman wine. He goes into the processes and
            >results in great detail. Some vintners in the
            >German Rhineland (and other parts of Europe - I
            >know of a project in Southern France, one in
            >Tuscany and one in Austria and I'm sure there's
            >more) make Roman wines the 'proper' way.
            >
            >If you want to do it 'right', you press the
            >grapes in a masonry or pottery vat by stepping
            >on them (wood is also possible, but far less
            >common - archeologists can identify vineyards by
            >the masonry pressing vats). Then you fill the
            >resulting liquid into coarseware pottery
            >containers lined with resin, pitch or oil and
            >ferment it (again, wooden casks were known, but
            >in very limited use). After the first pressing
            >(calcare), you can squeeze the remnants in a
            >wooden press for a second, lower quality must
            >and even water it for a third pressing. These would be the cheaper varieties.
            >
            >Most Roman wine was drunk relatively young - the
            >Vinalia Priora marked the opening of 'new' wine
            >on April 23, and while some fine vintages were
            >kept for a century or more, by that point much
            >of last year's wine would have been consumed.
            >Ideally, it was a dark 'white' (the amber colour
            >of heavy white wines was highly esteemed) and probably quite rich and brut.
            >
            >Additives were legal and common, including
            >various herbs, spices, honey, and seawater. You
            >may not want to play with those since it's
            >likely most Roman wines were 'as is' and only
            >specific (marked-up) types were altered.
            >
            >K.W.Weeber: Die Weinkuiltur der Römer' can tell
            >you everything you want to know.
            >
            >Vale
            >
            >Volker
            >
            >--- Octavian Silvermoon
            ><<mailto:octavian%40silvermoondesigns.org>octavian@...>
            >schrieb am Di, 5.8.2008:
            >
            > > Von: Octavian Silvermoon
            > <<mailto:octavian%40silvermoondesigns.org>octavian@...>
            > > Betreff: [Apicius] Roman Wine creation
            > > An: <mailto:apicius%40yahoogroups.com>apicius@yahoogroups.com
            > > Datum: Dienstag, 5. August 2008, 7:50
            > > Anyone on this list have practical re-creation information
            > > and/or references
            > > for how the Romans would have made wine? I am trying
            > > something out but
            > > would like to be able to try to make it as Roman as
            > > possible...
            > >
            > > ~Octavian Silvermoon
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > ------------------------------------
            > >
            > > Post message: <mailto:Apicius%40yahoogroups.com>Apicius@yahoogroups.com
            > > Unsubscribe:
            > <mailto:Apicius-unsubscribe%40yahoogroups.com>Apicius-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
            >
            > > List owner:
            > <mailto:Apicius-owner%40yahoogroups.com>Apicius-owner@yahoogroups.com
            > > Yahoo! Groups Links
            > >
            > >
            > >
            >
            >__________________________________________________________
            >Gesendet von Yahoo! Mail.
            >Dem pfiffigeren Posteingang.
            ><http://de.overview.mail.yahoo.com>http://de.overview.mail.yahoo.com
            >



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