Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [Apicius] question about Apicius recipe

Expand Messages
  • Correus
    Hey - have you all heard that REAL Absinthe may be allowed to be made and sold in the US again? Evidently they (liquor distillers) have figured out how to
    Message 1 of 26 , Nov 13, 2007
    • 0 Attachment
      Hey - have you all heard that REAL Absinthe may be allowed to be made and sold in the US again? Evidently they (liquor distillers) have figured out how to remove the harmful chemical.

      Just thought you might want to know.



      paul martinis <absalonmcoland@...> wrote:
      People like you are why I am in this group!
      Thank you very much for thoses links as it has
      answered quite a few questions I have had for awhile.
      --- Lilinah <lilinah@...> wrote:

      > Jennifer wrote:
      > >Thanks for helping clear that up. So many things on
      > the Internet turn
      > >out to be hoaxes that I wanted to ask. :)
      >
      > I would not call the concerns about certain herbs
      > hoaxes. They are,
      > rather, a bit of an over-reaction.
      >
      > >I've heard of wormwood, pennyroyal, rue, but wasn't
      > aware of absinthe.
      > >That wasn't something I've heard of before. Is it
      > an herb? I thought
      > >pennyroyal was a kind of flower.
      >
      > Absinthe is a liquor made with a number of different
      > herbs and
      > spices, among them wormwood herb and anise seeds. It
      > was
      > traditionally colored green (sometimes with added
      > colorant) and was
      > often known as "The Green Fairy". To drink absinthe,
      > one received a
      > special spoon, a special glass, sugar cubes, the
      > serving of absinthe,
      > and a carafe of water. The spoon, solid in the
      > center, held a sugar
      > cube, while around the center were slots or holes
      > and could rest
      > without other support over the top of the glass. The
      > absinthe was
      > slowly poured over the sugar cube. The liquor melted
      > the sugar and
      > ran through the openings into the glass. Then water
      > was added - about
      > 2 or 3 times as much water as liquor.
      > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Absinthe
      > This page shows the special absinthe glass and many
      > examples of the
      > special absinthe spoon and includes a list of many
      > of the ingredients
      > in absinthe liquor, as well as period art showing
      > absinthe drinkers
      > and the green fairy. This article on the whole is
      > quite excellent and
      > covers many aspects of absinthe - composition,
      > consumption, actual
      > health issues, and sensationalism and
      > fear-mongering.
      >
      > Wormwood is generally but one of the ingredients in
      > absinthe. It is
      > in the Artemesia family, which is a group of plants
      > many of which are
      > quite fragrant, such as Sagebrush, common in the
      > Southwestern US,
      > which is an Artemesia and is not related to sage
      > (Salvia)
      > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Absinth_Wormwood
      >
      > Pennyroyal is an herb in the mint family, Mentha
      > pulegium. It is not spearmint.
      > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pennyroyal
      > Clearly ingesting its concentrated oil in excess can
      > cause serious
      > health problems - including liver and kidney damage
      > - or even death.
      > However, a gentle infusion of the herb is not
      > harmful, although it
      > should probably be avoided by pregnant women.
      >
      > Rue fresh on or off the plant can cause contact
      > dermatitis in a
      > number of people who have a sensitivity to the oil
      > in the leaves -
      > they will get small blisters on their skin where
      > they have touched
      > it, or where it has brushed against them which can
      > be itchy and
      > painful. Most people do not have this reaction. My
      > understanding is
      > that when rue has been cooked, even those who get
      > contact dermatitis
      > from it when raw will have no adverse reaction.
      > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rue
      >
      > As with *many* herbs too frequent use or too large a
      > dose can be
      > harmful (just was with some medications and some
      > foods). Some of this
      > harm is not immediately apparent, but, rather,
      > cumulative. One can be
      > doing liver and/or kidney damage and not know it
      > until one reaches a
      > certain critical level of damage.
      >
      > As i only ingest in small quantities and
      > infrequently wormwood, rue,
      > pennyroyal, and other herbs about which there are
      > legitimate health
      > concerns (such as when taken in large doses or if
      > one has liver or
      > kidney problems or if one is pregnant), i'm not too
      > worried.
      >
      > I know that some of the people who panic over the
      > idea of a teaspoon
      > of rue in a dish serving 12 or more diners, none of
      > whom are
      > pregnant, don't read the inserts in medications that
      > list the
      > potential side effects (here in the US), or read
      > them and just blow
      > them off. Some of them are smokers, which is known
      > to be hazardous to
      > health, undoubtedly more so than the rare and
      > occasional consumption
      > of a tiny amount of pennyroyal, rue, or wormwood.
      >
      > One should educate oneself and use good common sense
      > (which is all
      > too often not very common).
      >
      > Do not discount concerns as hoaxes. Read up on the
      > side effects and
      > hazards and the quantities that it takes to cause
      > them. And remember
      > that there are always individuals who are more
      > sensitive than others
      > and for whom these plants can cause harm.
      >
      > While i've included links to articles on wikipedia,
      > i know that it is
      > not the most complete resource, but in my
      > experience, it is generally
      > an excellent place to start (although the section on
      > coffee is highly
      > flawed :-).
      >
      > Anahita
      > --
      > "The truth must be taken wherever it is to be found,
      > whether it be in the past or among strange peoples."
      > -- al-Kindi, Baghdad (801-873)
      >

      Tiberious Flavius Poulos,Centurio,LEGIIAVG

      __________________________________________________________
      Never miss a thing. Make Yahoo your home page.
      http://www.yahoo.com/r/hs





      Larry in Kansas USA

      My ’63 SIIa 88 Land Rover Blob
      http://grover-the-rover.blogspot.com/

      Our House Restoration Blog
      http://simpsonsfolly.blogspot.com/


      The truth may be boring, and even unpleasant: But it is always better than half truths and out right lies ~ therefore, reality bites!



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Jennifer Mackay
      Thanks for the links. It s good to know. I did not know if it was legit or not, since my familiarity with these herbs is new rather than old. I generally use
      Message 2 of 26 , Nov 13, 2007
      • 0 Attachment
        Thanks for the links. It's good to know. I did not know if it was legit
        or not, since my familiarity with these herbs is new rather than old.

        I generally use mint or ginger tea for an upset stomach. My favorite is
        mint. :)

        Looks like it would be hard to guess what would be a small amount,
        unless you're knowledgeable about herbs. I'd gather that adding any of
        these things to a dish you were giving to a group of people might not
        be wise unless they were told what is in it.

        What would be a small amount? 1/8 tsp versus 1 tsp. or 1 tb?

        Jennifer
      • caiusfabius
        Secret chemicals in Absinthe? There is no secret harmful chemical , except for the alcohol and wormword, at least in the stuff I was drinking in Lithuania,
        Message 3 of 26 , Nov 14, 2007
        • 0 Attachment
          Secret chemicals in Absinthe?
          There is no secret 'harmful chemical', except for the alcohol and
          wormword, at least in the stuff I was drinking in Lithuania, France
          and Italy. That is a myth put out in the past. Sure the leeching
          lead, and regional and individual added ingredients may be unhealthy,
          but then they change the drink. I did have some drinks that had other
          items added in Italy, that left me with more than an alcoholic buzz,
          but then ...... the Romans didn't distill hard alcohol, as far as I
          can tell, so Absinthe is not Roman, and wormwood in wine or food is
          medical/healthy. I have a pound of powdered wormwood in my medicine
          shelf, next to the powdered white willow bark, and other home remedies
          used by the Romans. You really need to know what you are doing, with
          anything you consume, from meat to fruits to herbs.....

          The 'panic mode' where people start passing rumours, is one that I see
          happing in a cyclic fashion, especially on internet newsgroups, and
          rue, pennyroyal and wormwood seem to be the main 'keywords' when
          studying 'dangerous' Roman food. Maybe that makes it more 'sexy'?


          It is bitter, which is why the custom was to drink it after pouring
          the Absinthe through sugar. I didn't find any 'special" properties in
          Absinthe, and in fact I used it as a mouthwash, due to the high
          alcohol and low cost in Lithuania.

          If you want to taste Absinthe in the USA, many SCA brewers/vintners
          make it, with different additional ingredients. I still have some
          bottles of the French absinthe, (less powerful), which were allowed
          through US Customs on my last trip.

          Caius Fabius




          -- In Apicius@yahoogroups.com, Correus <correus@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hey - have you all heard that REAL Absinthe may be allowed to be
          made and sold in the US again? Evidently they (liquor distillers)
          have figured out how to remove the harmful chemical.
          >
          > Just thought you might want to know.
          >
          >
          >
          > paul martinis <absalonmcoland@...> wrote:
          > People like you are why I am in this group!
          > Thank you very much for thoses links as it has
          > answered quite a few questions I have had for awhile.
          > --- Lilinah <lilinah@...> wrote:
          >
          > > Jennifer wrote:
          > > >Thanks for helping clear that up. So many things on
          > > the Internet turn
          > > >out to be hoaxes that I wanted to ask. :)
          > >
          > > I would not call the concerns about certain herbs
          > > hoaxes. They are,
          > > rather, a bit of an over-reaction.
          > >
          > > >I've heard of wormwood, pennyroyal, rue, but wasn't
          > > aware of absinthe.
          > > >That wasn't something I've heard of before. Is it
          > > an herb? I thought
          > > >pennyroyal was a kind of flower.
          > >
          > > Absinthe is a liquor made with a number of different
          > > herbs and
          > > spices, among them wormwood herb and anise seeds. It
          > > was
          > > traditionally colored green (sometimes with added
          > > colorant) and was
          > > often known as "The Green Fairy". To drink absinthe,
          > > one received a
          > > special spoon, a special glass, sugar cubes, the
          > > serving of absinthe,
          > > and a carafe of water. The spoon, solid in the
          > > center, held a sugar
          > > cube, while around the center were slots or holes
          > > and could rest
          > > without other support over the top of the glass. The
          > > absinthe was
          > > slowly poured over the sugar cube. The liquor melted
          > > the sugar and
          > > ran through the openings into the glass. Then water
          > > was added - about
          > > 2 or 3 times as much water as liquor.
          > > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Absinthe
          > > This page shows the special absinthe glass and many
          > > examples of the
          > > special absinthe spoon and includes a list of many
          > > of the ingredients
          > > in absinthe liquor, as well as period art showing
          > > absinthe drinkers
          > > and the green fairy. This article on the whole is
          > > quite excellent and
          > > covers many aspects of absinthe - composition,
          > > consumption, actual
          > > health issues, and sensationalism and
          > > fear-mongering.
          > >
          > > Wormwood is generally but one of the ingredients in
          > > absinthe. It is
          > > in the Artemesia family, which is a group of plants
          > > many of which are
          > > quite fragrant, such as Sagebrush, common in the
          > > Southwestern US,
          > > which is an Artemesia and is not related to sage
          > > (Salvia)
          > > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Absinth_Wormwood
          > >
          > > Pennyroyal is an herb in the mint family, Mentha
          > > pulegium. It is not spearmint.
          > > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pennyroyal
          > > Clearly ingesting its concentrated oil in excess can
          > > cause serious
          > > health problems - including liver and kidney damage
          > > - or even death.
          > > However, a gentle infusion of the herb is not
          > > harmful, although it
          > > should probably be avoided by pregnant women.
          > >
          > > Rue fresh on or off the plant can cause contact
          > > dermatitis in a
          > > number of people who have a sensitivity to the oil
          > > in the leaves -
          > > they will get small blisters on their skin where
          > > they have touched
          > > it, or where it has brushed against them which can
          > > be itchy and
          > > painful. Most people do not have this reaction. My
          > > understanding is
          > > that when rue has been cooked, even those who get
          > > contact dermatitis
          > > from it when raw will have no adverse reaction.
          > > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rue
          > >
          > > As with *many* herbs too frequent use or too large a
          > > dose can be
          > > harmful (just was with some medications and some
          > > foods). Some of this
          > > harm is not immediately apparent, but, rather,
          > > cumulative. One can be
          > > doing liver and/or kidney damage and not know it
          > > until one reaches a
          > > certain critical level of damage.
          > >
          > > As i only ingest in small quantities and
          > > infrequently wormwood, rue,
          > > pennyroyal, and other herbs about which there are
          > > legitimate health
          > > concerns (such as when taken in large doses or if
          > > one has liver or
          > > kidney problems or if one is pregnant), i'm not too
          > > worried.
          > >
          > > I know that some of the people who panic over the
          > > idea of a teaspoon
          > > of rue in a dish serving 12 or more diners, none of
          > > whom are
          > > pregnant, don't read the inserts in medications that
          > > list the
          > > potential side effects (here in the US), or read
          > > them and just blow
          > > them off. Some of them are smokers, which is known
          > > to be hazardous to
          > > health, undoubtedly more so than the rare and
          > > occasional consumption
          > > of a tiny amount of pennyroyal, rue, or wormwood.
          > >
          > > One should educate oneself and use good common sense
          > > (which is all
          > > too often not very common).
          > >
          > > Do not discount concerns as hoaxes. Read up on the
          > > side effects and
          > > hazards and the quantities that it takes to cause
          > > them. And remember
          > > that there are always individuals who are more
          > > sensitive than others
          > > and for whom these plants can cause harm.
          > >
          > > While i've included links to articles on wikipedia,
          > > i know that it is
          > > not the most complete resource, but in my
          > > experience, it is generally
          > > an excellent place to start (although the section on
          > > coffee is highly
          > > flawed :-).
          > >
          > > Anahita
          > > --
          > > "The truth must be taken wherever it is to be found,
          > > whether it be in the past or among strange peoples."
          > > -- al-Kindi, Baghdad (801-873)
          > >
          >
          > Tiberious Flavius Poulos,Centurio,LEGIIAVG
          >
          > __________________________________________________________
          > Never miss a thing. Make Yahoo your home page.
          > http://www.yahoo.com/r/hs
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Larry in Kansas USA
          >
          > My '63 SIIa 88 Land Rover Blob
          > http://grover-the-rover.blogspot.com/
          >
          > Our House Restoration Blog
          > http://simpsonsfolly.blogspot.com/
          >
          >
          > The truth may be boring, and even unpleasant: But it is always
          better than half truths and out right lies ~ therefore, reality bites!
          >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
        • Correus
          No, there is no secret chemicals in Absinthe; the chemical is Thujone. This is the chemical that caused it to be panned to begin with. What I meant was that a
          Message 4 of 26 , Nov 14, 2007
          • 0 Attachment
            No, there is no secret chemicals in Absinthe; the chemical is Thujone. This is the chemical that caused it to be panned to begin with.

            What I meant was that a distilling company has been 'supposedly' found a way to cut the effects that Thujone is to have or they have found a way to completely eliminate it.

            The amount of Thujone in food items is regulated in the US.

            Thujone has since been found NOT to have caused the problems in the original versions of Absinthe. However, the original formula has a higher level than allowed by US law. Now that this company found a way to limit, or eliminate it, they will be producing it.

            Also, keep in mind that just because they have it in Europe, or other areas of the world, doesn't mean it is allowed here. For example, there are many cheese and meat products that are consumed all over Europe, and are perfectly safe, but due to the strict (and IMHO uncalled for most of the time) food regulations here they are not allowed to be imported.

            Correus

            caiusfabius <SPQR_HQ@...> wrote:

            Secret chemicals in Absinthe?
            There is no secret 'harmful chemical', except for the alcohol and
            wormword, at least in the stuff I was drinking in Lithuania, France
            and Italy. That is a myth put out in the past. Sure the leeching
            lead, and regional and individual added ingredients may be unhealthy,
            but then they change the drink. I did have some drinks that had other
            items added in Italy, that left me with more than an alcoholic buzz,
            but then ...... the Romans didn't distill hard alcohol, as far as I
            can tell, so Absinthe is not Roman, and wormwood in wine or food is
            medical/healthy. I have a pound of powdered wormwood in my medicine
            shelf, next to the powdered white willow bark, and other home remedies
            used by the Romans. You really need to know what you are doing, with
            anything you consume, from meat to fruits to herbs.....

            The 'panic mode' where people start passing rumours, is one that I see
            happing in a cyclic fashion, especially on internet newsgroups, and
            rue, pennyroyal and wormwood seem to be the main 'keywords' when
            studying 'dangerous' Roman food. Maybe that makes it more 'sexy'?

            It is bitter, which is why the custom was to drink it after pouring
            the Absinthe through sugar. I didn't find any 'special" properties in
            Absinthe, and in fact I used it as a mouthwash, due to the high
            alcohol and low cost in Lithuania.

            If you want to taste Absinthe in the USA, many SCA brewers/vintners
            make it, with different additional ingredients. I still have some
            bottles of the French absinthe, (less powerful), which were allowed
            through US Customs on my last trip.

            Caius Fabius

            -- In Apicius@yahoogroups.com, Correus <correus@...> wrote:
            >
            > Hey - have you all heard that REAL Absinthe may be allowed to be
            made and sold in the US again? Evidently they (liquor distillers)
            have figured out how to remove the harmful chemical.
            >
            > Just thought you might want to know.
            >
            >
            >
            > paul martinis <absalonmcoland@...> wrote:
            > People like you are why I am in this group!
            > Thank you very much for thoses links as it has
            > answered quite a few questions I have had for awhile.
            > --- Lilinah <lilinah@...> wrote:
            >
            > > Jennifer wrote:
            > > >Thanks for helping clear that up. So many things on
            > > the Internet turn
            > > >out to be hoaxes that I wanted to ask. :)
            > >
            > > I would not call the concerns about certain herbs
            > > hoaxes. They are,
            > > rather, a bit of an over-reaction.
            > >
            > > >I've heard of wormwood, pennyroyal, rue, but wasn't
            > > aware of absinthe.
            > > >That wasn't something I've heard of before. Is it
            > > an herb? I thought
            > > >pennyroyal was a kind of flower.
            > >
            > > Absinthe is a liquor made with a number of different
            > > herbs and
            > > spices, among them wormwood herb and anise seeds. It
            > > was
            > > traditionally colored green (sometimes with added
            > > colorant) and was
            > > often known as "The Green Fairy". To drink absinthe,
            > > one received a
            > > special spoon, a special glass, sugar cubes, the
            > > serving of absinthe,
            > > and a carafe of water. The spoon, solid in the
            > > center, held a sugar
            > > cube, while around the center were slots or holes
            > > and could rest
            > > without other support over the top of the glass. The
            > > absinthe was
            > > slowly poured over the sugar cube. The liquor melted
            > > the sugar and
            > > ran through the openings into the glass. Then water
            > > was added - about
            > > 2 or 3 times as much water as liquor.
            > > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Absinthe
            > > This page shows the special absinthe glass and many
            > > examples of the
            > > special absinthe spoon and includes a list of many
            > > of the ingredients
            > > in absinthe liquor, as well as period art showing
            > > absinthe drinkers
            > > and the green fairy. This article on the whole is
            > > quite excellent and
            > > covers many aspects of absinthe - composition,
            > > consumption, actual
            > > health issues, and sensationalism and
            > > fear-mongering.
            > >
            > > Wormwood is generally but one of the ingredients in
            > > absinthe. It is
            > > in the Artemesia family, which is a group of plants
            > > many of which are
            > > quite fragrant, such as Sagebrush, common in the
            > > Southwestern US,
            > > which is an Artemesia and is not related to sage
            > > (Salvia)
            > > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Absinth_Wormwood
            > >
            > > Pennyroyal is an herb in the mint family, Mentha
            > > pulegium. It is not spearmint.
            > > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pennyroyal
            > > Clearly ingesting its concentrated oil in excess can
            > > cause serious
            > > health problems - including liver and kidney damage
            > > - or even death.
            > > However, a gentle infusion of the herb is not
            > > harmful, although it
            > > should probably be avoided by pregnant women.
            > >
            > > Rue fresh on or off the plant can cause contact
            > > dermatitis in a
            > > number of people who have a sensitivity to the oil
            > > in the leaves -
            > > they will get small blisters on their skin where
            > > they have touched
            > > it, or where it has brushed against them which can
            > > be itchy and
            > > painful. Most people do not have this reaction. My
            > > understanding is
            > > that when rue has been cooked, even those who get
            > > contact dermatitis
            > > from it when raw will have no adverse reaction.
            > > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rue
            > >
            > > As with *many* herbs too frequent use or too large a
            > > dose can be
            > > harmful (just was with some medications and some
            > > foods). Some of this
            > > harm is not immediately apparent, but, rather,
            > > cumulative. One can be
            > > doing liver and/or kidney damage and not know it
            > > until one reaches a
            > > certain critical level of damage.
            > >
            > > As i only ingest in small quantities and
            > > infrequently wormwood, rue,
            > > pennyroyal, and other herbs about which there are
            > > legitimate health
            > > concerns (such as when taken in large doses or if
            > > one has liver or
            > > kidney problems or if one is pregnant), i'm not too
            > > worried.
            > >
            > > I know that some of the people who panic over the
            > > idea of a teaspoon
            > > of rue in a dish serving 12 or more diners, none of
            > > whom are
            > > pregnant, don't read the inserts in medications that
            > > list the
            > > potential side effects (here in the US), or read
            > > them and just blow
            > > them off. Some of them are smokers, which is known
            > > to be hazardous to
            > > health, undoubtedly more so than the rare and
            > > occasional consumption
            > > of a tiny amount of pennyroyal, rue, or wormwood.
            > >
            > > One should educate oneself and use good common sense
            > > (which is all
            > > too often not very common).
            > >
            > > Do not discount concerns as hoaxes. Read up on the
            > > side effects and
            > > hazards and the quantities that it takes to cause
            > > them. And remember
            > > that there are always individuals who are more
            > > sensitive than others
            > > and for whom these plants can cause harm.
            > >
            > > While i've included links to articles on wikipedia,
            > > i know that it is
            > > not the most complete resource, but in my
            > > experience, it is generally
            > > an excellent place to start (although the section on
            > > coffee is highly
            > > flawed :-).
            > >
            > > Anahita
            > > --
            > > "The truth must be taken wherever it is to be found,
            > > whether it be in the past or among strange peoples."
            > > -- al-Kindi, Baghdad (801-873)
            > >
            >
            > Tiberious Flavius Poulos,Centurio,LEGIIAVG
            >
            > __________________________________________________________
            > Never miss a thing. Make Yahoo your home page.
            > http://www.yahoo.com/r/hs
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > Larry in Kansas USA
            >
            > My '63 SIIa 88 Land Rover Blob
            > http://grover-the-rover.blogspot.com/
            >
            > Our House Restoration Blog
            > http://simpsonsfolly.blogspot.com/
            >
            >
            > The truth may be boring, and even unpleasant: But it is always
            better than half truths and out right lies ~ therefore, reality bites!
            >
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >






            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Oct'avian Silvermoon
            ... I keep looking for a Czech style absinthe without the licorice taste of the anise, but so-called anise-free ones still taste like licorice to me ~Oct avian
            Message 5 of 26 , Nov 14, 2007
            • 0 Attachment
              --- In Apicius@yahoogroups.com, paul martinis <absalonmcoland@...> wrote:
              >
              > Absinthe is an alcoholic drink that needs to be tasted
              > in small quantities.
              > I for one could never learn to like it as it is one of
              > the most bitter things ever put in my mouth!

              I keep looking for a Czech style absinthe without the licorice taste
              of the anise, but so-called anise-free ones still taste like licorice
              to me

              ~Oct'avian
            • Oct'avian Silvermoon
              ... Which is why you shouldn t make your own... it can kill you. ... It was actually considered to be taboo and socially uncouth to drink it straight, kind of
              Message 6 of 26 , Nov 15, 2007
              • 0 Attachment
                --- In Apicius@yahoogroups.com, Lilinah <lilinah@...> wrote:

                > Have you been drinking home-made absinthe? Many of my Goth friends
                > make their own, and in their desire to hit that supposed
                > hallucinogenic point, they use WAY too much wormwood.

                Which is why you shouldn't make your own... it can kill you.

                > Many of the anise liqueurs in France are based on absinthe without
                > the wormwood. They are very sweet, and i get the impression that a
                > tad over 100 years ago when absinthe was a popular beverage, it was
                > meant to be drunk sweet, hence the special absinthe spoon and the
                > additional sugar.

                It was actually considered to be taboo and socially uncouth to drink
                it straight, kind of like any other alcoholic beverage. And due to
                the bitter taste, it was usually sweetened. and also diluted with
                water to create a nice luche.

                > I confess that i have not drunk any of the current commercially made
                > European absinthes for comparison. I should ask my Goth friends
                > who've visited Prague...

                There are studies that have been done that show that the historical
                recipes are actually not much stronger than what the modern EU laws
                allow for the regulation amounts of Thujone in the liquor.

                ~Oct'avian
              • Oct'avian Silvermoon
                ... To put it on the record for legality in the U.S.: Absinthe is not sold in the United States because the FDA does not allow the sales of spirited beverages
                Message 7 of 26 , Nov 15, 2007
                • 0 Attachment
                  --- In Apicius@yahoogroups.com, "apollosfriend" <JimKollens@...> wrote:
                  > Sorry, Jennifer, if I am at fault for any confusion. Absinthe is an
                  > alcoholic beverage made from wormwood. It is currently illegal in the
                  > United States and some other countries. It tastes quite similar to
                  > Herbsaint or Ouzo. The general feeling about absinthe is that the
                  > blame on wormwood was unjustified, but that it's extremely high
                  > alcohol content was responsible for vast numbers of alcoholics in the
                  > 1900's. However, very high doses of wormwood are poisonous and will,
                  > indeed, cause hallucinations, but not in the amounts found in a bottle
                  > of absinthe.


                  To put it on the record for legality in the U.S.: Absinthe is not sold
                  in the United States because the FDA does not allow the sales of
                  spirited beverages that contain the chemical compound thujone.
                  However, it is not a controlled substance, you can possess and
                  consume. There are a number of companies the UK, France, and
                  especially Germany, which process the financial transaction on your
                  behalf and then ship it to you, thereby bypassing the purchasing
                  restriction in the U.S.

                  ~Oct'avian
                • Oct'avian Silvermoon
                  ... made and sold in the US again? Evidently they (liquor distillers) have figured out how to remove the harmful chemical. ... There are actually already some
                  Message 8 of 26 , Nov 15, 2007
                  • 0 Attachment
                    --- In Apicius@yahoogroups.com, Correus <correus@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Hey - have you all heard that REAL Absinthe may be allowed to be
                    made and sold in the US again? Evidently they (liquor distillers)
                    have figured out how to remove the harmful chemical.
                    >
                    > Just thought you might want to know.

                    There are actually already some varieties available for purchase in
                    the U.S...

                    Here are links to a couple-

                    http://www.drinkupny.com/category_s/86.htm
                    http://www.drinklucid.com/get_lucid_absinthe.cfm

                    Most of the reading that I've done in the last couple months put
                    'Lucid' as about the only brand "readily available" even though there
                    are 2-3 different ones.

                    ~Oct'avian
                  • paul martinis
                    Octavian, Remember the Roman that camps withme(the one that made the fullsized ballista)? He has made several real batches of the bitter stuff. Next event he
                    Message 9 of 26 , Nov 16, 2007
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Octavian,
                      Remember the Roman that camps withme(the one that made
                      the fullsized ballista)?
                      He has made several real batches of the bitter stuff.
                      Next event he will probably have some with him.
                      --- Oct'avian Silvermoon
                      <octavian@...> wrote:

                      > --- In Apicius@yahoogroups.com, Correus
                      > <correus@...> wrote:
                      > >
                      > > Hey - have you all heard that REAL Absinthe may be
                      > allowed to be
                      > made and sold in the US again? Evidently they
                      > (liquor distillers)
                      > have figured out how to remove the harmful chemical.
                      > >
                      > > Just thought you might want to know.
                      >
                      > There are actually already some varieties available
                      > for purchase in
                      > the U.S...
                      >
                      > Here are links to a couple-
                      >
                      > http://www.drinkupny.com/category_s/86.htm
                      > http://www.drinklucid.com/get_lucid_absinthe.cfm
                      >
                      > Most of the reading that I've done in the last
                      > couple months put
                      > 'Lucid' as about the only brand "readily available"
                      > even though there
                      > are 2-3 different ones.
                      >
                      > ~Oct'avian
                      >
                      >


                      Tiberious Flavius Poulos,Centurio,LEGIIAVG




                      ____________________________________________________________________________________
                      Get easy, one-click access to your favorites.
                      Make Yahoo! your homepage.
                      http://www.yahoo.com/r/hs
                    • Oct'avian Silvermoon
                      ... Sweet :) I brought out a French bottle at Tim s wake at Blackethorne, La Muse Verte s Spiritueux Aux Plantes D Absinthe ~Oct avian
                      Message 10 of 26 , Nov 17, 2007
                      • 0 Attachment
                        --- In Apicius@yahoogroups.com, paul martinis <absalonmcoland@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Octavian,
                        > Remember the Roman that camps withme(the one that made
                        > the fullsized ballista)?
                        > He has made several real batches of the bitter stuff.
                        > Next event he will probably have some with him.

                        Sweet :) I brought out a French bottle at Tim's wake at Blackethorne,
                        La Muse Verte's "Spiritueux Aux Plantes D'Absinthe"

                        ~Oct'avian
                      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.