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cheese and...

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  • Sallygrain@xxx.xxx
    Hi all Thanks Marco for a name at last for these fresh cheeses. I am a long way from a good deli or Harrods for that matter and so I tried to make my own
    Message 1 of 2 , Nov 8, 1999
      Hi all

      Thanks Marco for a name at last for these fresh cheeses. I am a long way
      from a good deli or Harrods for that matter and so I tried to make my own
      fresh sheeps cheese. I wanted to make the Cato cake recipes in as authentic
      a manner as possible. I used Columella's simple recipe and it turned out
      very well. And the ckes were very different from those I made with ricotta.
      There is a slight rubbery texture to them which was interesting, not
      unpleasant, just interesting.

      I then asked the question Did the Romans make cream or soft cheeses as we
      know them. If you look at the detailed instructions in the recipes for
      Placenta in Cato, it appears that these fresh cheeses were soaked, squeezed,
      sieved and beaten before being ready to use as a 'cream' cheese for these
      cakes.

      As for Baklava I am unsure, there is no direct evidence for a honey syrup
      being poured over a baked layered cake as this is. There were thin (though
      not fillo) sheets of pastry used in many ways with honey,nuts and cheese but
      they tended to be baked together which made the layers soft. These sheets
      were called tracta, itria or lagana. Itria appears to be an early name for
      pasta in medieval Italian food - at the risk of starting the "did the Romans
      have pasta?" question again.
      I agree though with the unprovable theory that baklava was probably around in
      the classical period, we just dont have the direct evidence.

      Thanks to whoever said that cornflour is often made with wheat as apposed to
      corn. I had no idea. I always use cornflour in replacement of the starch
      extracted from soaked wheat - amulum. Incidently the tracta (obove) were
      also dried and crumbled into stews etc as a thickener. I have tried this and
      it works very well.

      vale
      sally
    • Perlina Varon
      Hello, Can someone please tell me if the Hebrew itriya (=noodle) has any connection to the Latin itriya? Perlina Varon Tel Aviv University ... Romans
      Message 2 of 2 , Nov 8, 1999
        Hello,

        Can someone please tell me if the Hebrew itriya (=noodle) has any
        connection to the Latin itriya?

        Perlina Varon
        Tel Aviv University

        At 11:01 08/11/99 EST, you wrote:
        >From: Sallygrain@...
        >
        >Hi all
        >
        >As for Baklava I am unsure, there is no direct evidence for a honey syrup
        >being poured over a baked layered cake as this is. There were thin (though
        >not fillo) sheets of pastry used in many ways with honey,nuts and cheese but
        >they tended to be baked together which made the layers soft. These sheets
        >were called tracta, itria or lagana. Itria appears to be an early name for
        >pasta in medieval Italian food - at the risk of starting the "did the
        Romans
        >have pasta?" question again.
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