Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: dormice

Expand Messages
  • Kevin McDermott
    ... Lucia is quite right about squirrels and rabies; but the same might be said of any animal taken in the wild. Part of being a good and wise hunter is
    Message 1 of 17 , Jul 15, 2007
    • 0 Attachment
      --- In Apicius@yahoogroups.com, Lucia Clark <luciaclark@...> wrote:
      >
      > Squirrels are as common in the US as pigeons in Venice... :-) but
      > hunting them is a different story. they can also carry rabies,
      > particularly the urban ones.

      Lucia is quite right about squirrels and rabies; but the same might be said of
      any animal taken in the wild. Part of being a good and wise hunter is sufficient
      knowledge of what is and isn't normal--both in the behavior of animals before
      they're brought to bag, and also in the preparing of them for the pot.

      Having said that, squirrel hunting is a very old sport in the US, and in some
      Southern locales is still much practiced and beloved...as is the resulting meat.
      It's not an easy sport, from what I've heard....usually practiced with a rifle; the
      preferred method is called "barking:" as there's so little meat, the marksman
      aims his bullet_right next_to the animals head, and kills it by concussion.

      All of this boils down to (pun definitely intended): don't be put off taking up
      squirrel hunting, if you've a mind to--but be prepared to learn as much as you
      can from books and observation, and put in a lot of time at the range before
      the next season (you must, of course, check for legal season and bag limits in
      your area). If you're lucky enough to live in an area where squirreling is still
      practiced, a trip to your local--and I assure you, friendly--sportsman's club or
      gun range will probably get you a squirrel or two to try.

      No matter what you've heard: we hunters don't bite.

      COIVINIX
    • apollosfriend
      I just couldn t resist this.... http://grza.net/GIS/Dormice.jpg Dormice.jpg (JPEG Image, 350x250 pixels)
      Message 2 of 17 , Jul 15, 2007
      • 0 Attachment
        I just couldn't resist this....

        http://grza.net/GIS/Dormice.jpg
        Dormice.jpg (JPEG Image, 350x250 pixels)
      • Correus
        Um... The wife and I rehabilitate small animals and our specialty are squirrels. Please look at the following information before you start thinking al
        Message 3 of 17 , Jul 15, 2007
        • 0 Attachment
          Um...

          The wife and I rehabilitate small animals and our specialty are squirrels.

          Please look at the following information before you start thinking al squirrels are rabid.

          Small Wild Animal Bites: Rodents such as mice, rats, moles, gophers, chipmunks, prairie dogs and rabbits fortunately are considered free of rabies. Squirrels rarely carry rabies, but have not transmitted it to humans.
          Taken form: http://www.sflpp.com/ParentCare/AnimalOrHumanBite.html

          No. Squirrels are not a primary threat of transfer of rabies, raccoons and
          skunks are the most common carriers, but any mammal can carry rabies,
          squirrels can and will bite people, so there is a danger, even if perhaps
          smaller than with other animals.
          Taken from: http://www.newton.dep.anl.gov/askasci/gen01/gen01314.htm

          What animals almost never have rabies? Rabbits, hamsters, squirrels, chipmunks, guinea pigs, gerbils, opossums, rats, and mice are hardly ever affected with rabies (Birds, fish, bugs, amphibians, & reptiles don’t get rabies either.) . You may still need a tetanus shot or other medical care if these animals bite you.
          Taken from: http://pelotes.jea.com/rabies.htm

          Some animals, including chipmunks, gerbils, guinea pigs, hamsters, mice, rabbits, rats and squirrels, rarely get rabies. Birds, fish, insects, lizards, snakes and turtles never get rabies.
          Taken from: http://www.idph.state.il.us/public/hb/hbrabies.htm

          Correus





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Lucia Clark
          So we can safely cook salamanders, bees, ... :-D point taken. I don t hunt but I have a few squirrels in my yard, and LOTS of chipmunks. Any comments on those?
          Message 4 of 17 , Jul 15, 2007
          • 0 Attachment
            So we can safely cook salamanders, bees, ... :-D
            point taken. I don't hunt but I have a few squirrels in my yard, and
            LOTS of chipmunks. Any comments on those?



            At 08:49 PM 7/15/2007, you wrote:

            >Um...
            >
            >The wife and I rehabilitate small animals and our specialty are squirrels.
            >
            >Please look at the following information before you start thinking
            >al squirrels are rabid.
            >
            >Small Wild Animal Bites: Rodents such as mice, rats, moles, gophers,
            >chipmunks, prairie dogs and rabbits fortunately are considered free
            >of rabies. Squirrels rarely carry rabies, but have not transmitted
            >it to humans.
            >Taken form:
            ><http://www.sflpp.com/ParentCare/AnimalOrHumanBite.html>http://www.sflpp.com/ParentCare/AnimalOrHumanBite.html
            >
            >No. Squirrels are not a primary threat of transfer of rabies, raccoons and
            >skunks are the most common carriers, but any mammal can carry rabies,
            >squirrels can and will bite people, so there is a danger, even if perhaps
            >smaller than with other animals.
            >Taken from:
            ><http://www.newton.dep.anl.gov/askasci/gen01/gen01314.htm>http://www.newton.dep.anl.gov/askasci/gen01/gen01314.htm
            >
            >What animals almost never have rabies? Rabbits, hamsters, squirrels,
            >chipmunks, guinea pigs, gerbils, opossums, rats, and mice are hardly
            >ever affected with rabies (Birds, fish, bugs, amphibians, & reptiles
            >don't get rabies either.) . You may still need a tetanus shot or
            >other medical care if these animals bite you.
            >Taken from:
            ><http://pelotes.jea.com/rabies.htm>http://pelotes.jea.com/rabies.htm
            >
            >Some animals, including chipmunks, gerbils, guinea pigs, hamsters,
            >mice, rabbits, rats and squirrels, rarely get rabies. Birds, fish,
            >insects, lizards, snakes and turtles never get rabies.
            >Taken from:
            ><http://www.idph.state.il.us/public/hb/hbrabies.htm>http://www.idph.state.il.us/public/hb/hbrabies.htm
            >
            >Correus
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >



            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Correus
            They love peanuts (non roasted and non salted) and raisins!! If you give them ears of corn, the squirrels will eat the little white part out first and only eat
            Message 5 of 17 , Jul 15, 2007
            • 0 Attachment
              They love peanuts (non roasted and non salted) and raisins!!

              If you give them ears of corn, the squirrels will eat the little white part out first and only eat the yellow kernel when they are real hungry. Sometimes we see the mails do this and drop the yellow kernel to the ground where the females are.

              Correus

              Lucia Clark <luciaclark@...> wrote:
              So we can safely cook salamanders, bees, ... :-D
              point taken. I don't hunt but I have a few squirrels in my yard, and
              LOTS of chipmunks. Any comments on those?

              At 08:49 PM 7/15/2007, you wrote:

              >Um...
              >
              >The wife and I rehabilitate small animals and our specialty are squirrels.
              >
              >Please look at the following information before you start thinking
              >al squirrels are rabid.
              >
              >Small Wild Animal Bites: Rodents such as mice, rats, moles, gophers,
              >chipmunks, prairie dogs and rabbits fortunately are considered free
              >of rabies. Squirrels rarely carry rabies, but have not transmitted
              >it to humans.
              >Taken form:
              ><http://www.sflpp.com/ParentCare/AnimalOrHumanBite.html>http://www.sflpp.com/ParentCare/AnimalOrHumanBite.html
              >
              >No. Squirrels are not a primary threat of transfer of rabies, raccoons and
              >skunks are the most common carriers, but any mammal can carry rabies,
              >squirrels can and will bite people, so there is a danger, even if perhaps
              >smaller than with other animals.
              >Taken from:
              ><http://www.newton.dep.anl.gov/askasci/gen01/gen01314.htm>http://www.newton.dep.anl.gov/askasci/gen01/gen01314.htm
              >
              >What animals almost never have rabies? Rabbits, hamsters, squirrels,
              >chipmunks, guinea pigs, gerbils, opossums, rats, and mice are hardly
              >ever affected with rabies (Birds, fish, bugs, amphibians, & reptiles
              >don't get rabies either.) . You may still need a tetanus shot or
              >other medical care if these animals bite you.
              >Taken from:
              ><http://pelotes.jea.com/rabies.htm>http://pelotes.jea.com/rabies.htm
              >
              >Some animals, including chipmunks, gerbils, guinea pigs, hamsters,
              >mice, rabbits, rats and squirrels, rarely get rabies. Birds, fish,
              >insects, lizards, snakes and turtles never get rabies.
              >Taken from:
              ><http://www.idph.state.il.us/public/hb/hbrabies.htm>http://www.idph.state.il.us/public/hb/hbrabies.htm
              >
              >Correus
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              >

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • jdm314@aol.com
              So we can safely cook salamanders, bees, ... :-D I wouldn t cook salamanders if I were you. At least not if you re doing ancient cooking: the Greeks and Romans
              Message 6 of 17 , Jul 15, 2007
              • 0 Attachment
                So we can safely cook salamanders, bees, ... :-D


                I wouldn't cook salamanders if I were you. At least not if you're doing ancient cooking: the Greeks and Romans were quite convinced that salamanders were poisonous. They like fire you see (as an D&D player knows), and tend to jump into boiling pots of stew, rendering the whole thing toxic!

                I don't know what the locus classicus of this is, other than that it's a medical text. I once attended a very good talk on the topic.

                JDM









                -----Original Message-----
                From: Lucia Clark <luciaclark@...>
                To: Apicius@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Sun, 15 Jul 2007 9:31 pm
                Subject: Re: [Apicius] Squirrels and Rabies

























                So we can safely cook salamanders, bees, ... :-D

                point taken. I don't hunt but I have a few squirrels in my yard, and

                LOTS of chipmunks. Any comments on those?



                At 08:49 PM 7/15/2007, you wrote:



                >Um...

                >

                >The wife and I rehabilitate small animals and our specialty are squirrels.

                >

                >Please look at the following information before you start thinking

                >al squirrels are rabid.

                >

                >Small Wild Animal Bites: Rodents such as mice, rats, moles, gophers,

                >chipmunks, prairie dogs and rabbits fortunately are considered free

                >of rabies. Squirrels rarely carry rabies, but have not transmitted

                >it to humans.

                >Taken form:

                ><http://www.sflpp.com/ParentCare/AnimalOrHumanBite.html>http://www.sflpp.com/ParentCare/AnimalOrHumanBite.html

                >

                >No. Squirrels are not a primary threat of transfer of rabies, raccoons and

                >skunks are the most common carriers, but any mammal can carry rabies,

                >squirrels can and will bite people, so there is a danger, even if perhaps

                >smaller than with other animals.

                >Taken from:

                ><http://www.newton.dep.anl.gov/askasci/gen01/gen01314.htm>http://www.newton.dep.anl.gov/askasci/gen01/gen01314.htm

                >

                >What animals almost never have rabies? Rabbits, hamsters, squirrels,

                >chipmunks, guinea pigs, gerbils, opossums, rats, and mice are hardly

                >ever affected with rabies (Birds, fish, bugs, amphibians, & reptiles

                >don't get rabies either.) . You may still need a tetanus shot or

                >other medical care if these animals bite you.

                >Taken from:

                ><http://pelotes.jea.com/rabies.htm>http://pelotes.jea.com/rabies.htm

                >

                >Some animals, including chipmunks, gerbils, guinea pigs, hamsters,

                >mice, rabbits, rats and squirrels, rarely get rabies. Birds, fish,

                >insects, lizards, snakes and turtles never get rabies.

                >Taken from:

                ><http://www.idph.state.il.us/public/hb/hbrabies.htm>http://www.idph.state.il.us/public/hb/hbrabies.htm

                >

                >Correus

                >

                >

                >

                >

                >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                >

                >



                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

















                ________________________________________________________________________
                AOL now offers free email to everyone. Find out more about what's free from AOL at AOL.com.


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Lucia Clark
                oh gee, Iustinus, I was actually joking. We dug out a salamander in the garden this spring. Very interesting, but i am quite content to see them in a book. ...
                Message 7 of 17 , Jul 15, 2007
                • 0 Attachment
                  oh gee, Iustinus, I was actually joking. We dug out a salamander in
                  the garden this spring. Very interesting, but i am quite content to
                  see them in a book.


                  At 10:41 PM 7/15/2007, you wrote:




                  >So we can safely cook salamanders, bees, ... :-D
                  >
                  >I wouldn't cook salamanders if I were you. At least not if you're
                  >doing ancient cooking: the Greeks and Romans were quite convinced
                  >that salamanders were poisonous. They like fire you see (as an D&D
                  >player knows), and tend to jump into boiling pots of stew, rendering
                  >the whole thing toxic!
                  >
                  >I don't know what the locus classicus of this is, other than that
                  >it's a medical text. I once attended a very good talk on the topic.
                  >
                  >JDM
                  >
                  >-----Original Message-----
                  >From: Lucia Clark
                  ><<mailto:luciaclark%40luciadentice.com>luciaclark@...>
                  >To: <mailto:Apicius%40yahoogroups.com>Apicius@yahoogroups.com
                  >Sent: Sun, 15 Jul 2007 9:31 pm
                  >Subject: Re: [Apicius] Squirrels and Rabies
                  >
                  >So we can safely cook salamanders, bees, ... :-D
                  >
                  >point taken. I don't hunt but I have a few squirrels in my yard, and
                  >
                  >LOTS of chipmunks. Any comments on those?
                  >
                  >At 08:49 PM 7/15/2007, you wrote:
                  >
                  > >Um...
                  >
                  > >
                  >
                  > >The wife and I rehabilitate small animals and our specialty are squirrels.
                  >
                  > >
                  >
                  > >Please look at the following information before you start thinking
                  >
                  > >al squirrels are rabid.
                  >
                  > >
                  >
                  > >Small Wild Animal Bites: Rodents such as mice, rats, moles, gophers,
                  >
                  > >chipmunks, prairie dogs and rabbits fortunately are considered free
                  >
                  > >of rabies. Squirrels rarely carry rabies, but have not transmitted
                  >
                  > >it to humans.
                  >
                  > >Taken form:
                  >
                  > ><<http://www.sflpp.com/ParentCare/AnimalOrHumanBite.html>http://www
                  > .sflpp.com/ParentCare/AnimalOrHumanBite.html>http://www.sflpp.com/ParentCare/AnimalOrHumanBite.html
                  >
                  > >
                  >
                  > >No. Squirrels are not a primary threat of transfer of rabies, raccoons and
                  >
                  > >skunks are the most common carriers, but any mammal can carry rabies,
                  >
                  > >squirrels can and will bite people, so there is a danger, even if perhaps
                  >
                  > >smaller than with other animals.
                  >
                  > >Taken from:
                  >
                  > ><<http://www.newton.dep.anl.gov/askasci/gen01/gen01314.htm>http://w
                  > ww.newton.dep.anl.gov/askasci/gen01/gen01314.htm>http://www.newton.dep.anl.gov/askasci/gen01/gen01314.htm
                  >
                  > >
                  >
                  > >What animals almost never have rabies? Rabbits, hamsters, squirrels,
                  >
                  > >chipmunks, guinea pigs, gerbils, opossums, rats, and mice are hardly
                  >
                  > >ever affected with rabies (Birds, fish, bugs, amphibians, & reptiles
                  >
                  > >don't get rabies either.) . You may still need a tetanus shot or
                  >
                  > >other medical care if these animals bite you.
                  >
                  > >Taken from:
                  >
                  > ><<http://pelotes.jea.com/rabies.htm>http://pelotes.jea.com/rabies.h
                  > tm>http://pelotes.jea.com/rabies.htm
                  >
                  > >
                  >
                  > >Some animals, including chipmunks, gerbils, guinea pigs, hamsters,
                  >
                  > >mice, rabbits, rats and squirrels, rarely get rabies. Birds, fish,
                  >
                  > >insects, lizards, snakes and turtles never get rabies.
                  >
                  > >Taken from:
                  >
                  > ><<http://www.idph.state.il.us/public/hb/hbrabies.htm>http://www.idp
                  > h.state.il.us/public/hb/hbrabies.htm>http://www.idph.state.il.us/public/hb/hbrabies.htm
                  >
                  > >
                  >
                  > >Correus
                  >
                  > >
                  >
                  > >
                  >
                  > >
                  >
                  > >
                  >
                  > >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                  > >
                  >
                  > >
                  >
                  >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                  >__________________________________________________________
                  >AOL now offers free email to everyone. Find out more about what's
                  >free from AOL at AOL.com.
                  >
                  >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                  >



                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • jdm314@aol.com
                  oh gee, Iustinus, I was actually joking. We dug out a salamander in the garden this spring. Very interesting, but i am quite content to see them in a book. Oh,
                  Message 8 of 17 , Jul 15, 2007
                  • 0 Attachment
                    oh gee, Iustinus, I was actually joking. We dug out a salamander in

                    the garden this spring. Very interesting, but i am quite content to

                    see them in a book.




                    Oh, I knew that of course. But how could I resist?






                    -----Original Message-----
                    From: Lucia Clark <luciaclark@...>
                    To: Apicius@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Sun, 15 Jul 2007 10:04 pm
                    Subject: Re: [Apicius] Squirrels and Rabies

























                    oh gee, Iustinus, I was actually joking. We dug out a salamander in

                    the garden this spring. Very interesting, but i am quite content to

                    see them in a book.



                    At 10:41 PM 7/15/2007, you wrote:



                    >So we can safely cook salamanders, bees, ... :-D

                    >

                    >I wouldn't cook salamanders if I were you. At least not if you're

                    >doing ancient cooking: the Greeks and Romans were quite convinced

                    >that salamanders were poisonous. They like fire you see (as an D&D

                    >player knows), and tend to jump into boiling pots of stew, rendering

                    >the whole thing toxic!

                    >

                    >I don't know what the locus classicus of this is, other than that

                    >it's a medical text. I once attended a very good talk on the topic.

                    >

                    >JDM

                    >

                    >-----Original Message-----

                    >From: Lucia Clark

                    ><<mailto:luciaclark%40luciadentice.com>luciaclark@...>

                    >To: <mailto:Apicius%40yahoogroups.com>Apicius@yahoogroups.com

                    >Sent: Sun, 15 Jul 2007 9:31 pm

                    >Subject: Re: [Apicius] Squirrels and Rabies

                    >

                    >So we can safely cook salamanders, bees, ... :-D

                    >

                    >point taken. I don't hunt but I have a few squirrels in my yard, and

                    >

                    >LOTS of chipmunks. Any comments on those?

                    >

                    >At 08:49 PM 7/15/2007, you wrote:

                    >

                    > >Um...

                    >

                    > >

                    >

                    > >The wife and I rehabilitate small animals and our specialty are squirrels.

                    >

                    > >

                    >

                    > >Please look at the following information before you start thinking

                    >

                    > >al squirrels are rabid.

                    >

                    > >

                    >

                    > >Small Wild Animal Bites: Rodents such as mice, rats, moles, gophers,

                    >

                    > >chipmunks, prairie dogs and rabbits fortunately are considered free

                    >

                    > >of rabies. Squirrels rarely carry rabies, but have not transmitted

                    >

                    > >it to humans.

                    >

                    > >Taken form:

                    >

                    > ><<http://www.sflpp.com/ParentCare/AnimalOrHumanBite.html>http://www

                    > .sflpp.com/ParentCare/AnimalOrHumanBite.html>http://www.sflpp.com/ParentCare/AnimalOrHumanBite.html

                    >

                    > >

                    >

                    > >No. Squirrels are not a primary threat of transfer of rabies, raccoons and

                    >

                    > >skunks are the most common carriers, but any mammal can carry rabies,

                    >

                    > >squirrels can and will bite people, so there is a danger, even if perhaps

                    >

                    > >smaller than with other animals.

                    >

                    > >Taken from:

                    >

                    > ><<http://www.newton.dep.anl.gov/askasci/gen01/gen01314.htm>http://w

                    > ww.newton.dep.anl.gov/askasci/gen01/gen01314.htm>http://www.newton.dep.anl.gov/askasci/gen01/gen01314.htm

                    >

                    > >

                    >

                    > >What animals almost never have rabies? Rabbits, hamsters, squirrels,

                    >

                    > >chipmunks, guinea pigs, gerbils, opossums, rats, and mice are hardly

                    >

                    > >ever affected with rabies (Birds, fish, bugs, amphibians, & reptiles

                    >

                    > >don't get rabies either.) . You may still need a tetanus shot or

                    >

                    > >other medical care if these animals bite you.

                    >

                    > >Taken from:

                    >

                    > ><<http://pelotes.jea.com/rabies.htm>http://pelotes.jea.com/rabies.h

                    > tm>http://pelotes.jea.com/rabies.htm

                    >

                    > >

                    >

                    > >Some animals, including chipmunks, gerbils, guinea pigs, hamsters,

                    >

                    > >mice, rabbits, rats and squirrels, rarely get rabies. Birds, fish,

                    >

                    > >insects, lizards, snakes and turtles never get rabies.

                    >

                    > >Taken from:

                    >

                    > ><<http://www.idph.state.il.us/public/hb/hbrabies.htm>http://www.idp

                    > h.state.il.us/public/hb/hbrabies.htm>http://www.idph.state.il.us/public/hb/hbrabies.htm

                    >

                    > >

                    >

                    > >Correus

                    >

                    > >

                    >

                    > >

                    >

                    > >

                    >

                    > >

                    >

                    > >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                    >

                    > >

                    >

                    > >

                    >

                    >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                    >

                    >__________________________________________________________

                    >AOL now offers free email to everyone. Find out more about what's

                    >free from AOL at AOL.com.

                    >

                    >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                    >

                    >



                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

















                    ________________________________________________________________________
                    AOL now offers free email to everyone. Find out more about what's free from AOL at AOL.com.


                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • toast_y_toes
                    Following the discussions on this group I went on an internet search for Squirrel meat, apparently there is a group lobbying for us all to start eating Grey
                    Message 9 of 17 , Jul 16, 2007
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Following the discussions on this group I went on an internet search
                      for Squirrel meat, apparently there is a group lobbying for us all
                      to start eating Grey Squirrels, as they have pretty much eradicated
                      the native Red Squirrel population here in the UK...so far I can't
                      find anyone who's doing it though.



                      http://www.newsandstar.co.uk/news/viewarticle.aspx?id=347278

                      Luckily Rabies has been wiped out here, but they look feisty little
                      fellas, don't think i'd like a bite from one regardless ;o)



                      --- In Apicius@yahoogroups.com, Correus <correus@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Um...
                      >
                      > The wife and I rehabilitate small animals and our specialty are
                      squirrels.
                      >
                      > Please look at the following information before you start
                      thinking al squirrels are rabid.
                      >
                      > Small Wild Animal Bites: Rodents such as mice, rats, moles,
                      gophers, chipmunks, prairie dogs and rabbits fortunately are
                      considered free of rabies. Squirrels rarely carry rabies, but have
                      not transmitted it to humans.
                      > Taken form:
                      http://www.sflpp.com/ParentCare/AnimalOrHumanBite.html
                      >
                      > No. Squirrels are not a primary threat of transfer of rabies,
                      raccoons and
                      > skunks are the most common carriers, but any mammal can carry
                      rabies,
                      > squirrels can and will bite people, so there is a danger, even if
                      perhaps
                      > smaller than with other animals.
                      > Taken from:
                      http://www.newton.dep.anl.gov/askasci/gen01/gen01314.htm
                      >
                      > What animals almost never have rabies? Rabbits, hamsters,
                      squirrels, chipmunks, guinea pigs, gerbils, opossums, rats, and mice
                      are hardly ever affected with rabies (Birds, fish, bugs, amphibians,
                      & reptiles don't get rabies either.) . You may still need a tetanus
                      shot or other medical care if these animals bite you.
                      > Taken from: http://pelotes.jea.com/rabies.htm
                      >
                      > Some animals, including chipmunks, gerbils, guinea pigs,
                      hamsters, mice, rabbits, rats and squirrels, rarely get rabies.
                      Birds, fish, insects, lizards, snakes and turtles never get rabies.
                      > Taken from: http://www.idph.state.il.us/public/hb/hbrabies.htm
                      >
                      > Correus
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      >
                    • Correus
                      We had a squirrel we raised from 4 days old. I was the first living thing he saw when his opened (yes, I was holding them when they opened). His name was
                      Message 10 of 17 , Jul 16, 2007
                      • 0 Attachment
                        We had a squirrel we raised from 4 days old. I was the first living thing he saw when his opened (yes, I was holding them when they opened). His name was Simon and he was a lot like a kitten, but with a much bigger tail.

                        It took a lot of TLC to raise him and prepare him to go back into the wild. Since he had no mother, we had to help him learn how to jump and climb and all that sort of stuff.

                        It was hard when the day came for us to release him back into the wild but we did. However, we were some of the lucky ones. Simon did not go completely wild but would actually come to us when we called. Eventually he did become more wild, but as long as we were gentle and quite we could still walk up to him and feed him and bet him.

                        He would even give us little love bites, but wouldn't bite us hard at all. We have had several bite us, but that was because they were in pain or just plain scared.

                        Squirrels only have a life span of 5 years in the wild, so we believe he is dead now. But we do know his children are running around in our trees. We thought that perhaps he was dead a couple of years ago because of all the other males out there. Squirrels are very territorial and the wild males in our yard did not like Simon.

                        Anyway, as I said, we thought he was dead a couple of years ago because we hadn't seen him in a while. Then, one day while visiting my parents (where we had found him) my wife happened to look up into one of their trees and she said "Honey, there's Simon"! We couldn't believe it, it WAS him!! We hadn't seen him in a year and there he was, in a tree at my parents house! We walked up to the tree and called up to him. He immediately came to us so we gave him a peanut and some water.

                        To this day, every once in a while we will be cleaning something in the house and we will find a peanut or walnut that Simon hid in the house. We even have a walnut tree growing that started as a nut Simon planted in a house plant.

                        Correus



                        toast_y_toes <alicia_faye@...> wrote:
                        Following the discussions on this group I went on an internet search
                        for Squirrel meat, apparently there is a group lobbying for us all
                        to start eating Grey Squirrels, as they have pretty much eradicated
                        the native Red Squirrel population here in the UK...so far I can't
                        find anyone who's doing it though.

                        http://www.newsandstar.co.uk/news/viewarticle.aspx?id=347278

                        Luckily Rabies has been wiped out here, but they look feisty little
                        fellas, don't think i'd like a bite from one regardless ;o)

                        --- In Apicius@yahoogroups.com, Correus <correus@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Um...
                        >
                        > The wife and I rehabilitate small animals and our specialty are
                        squirrels.
                        >
                        > Please look at the following information before you start
                        thinking al squirrels are rabid.
                        >
                        > Small Wild Animal Bites: Rodents such as mice, rats, moles,
                        gophers, chipmunks, prairie dogs and rabbits fortunately are
                        considered free of rabies. Squirrels rarely carry rabies, but have
                        not transmitted it to humans.
                        > Taken form:
                        http://www.sflpp.com/ParentCare/AnimalOrHumanBite.html
                        >
                        > No. Squirrels are not a primary threat of transfer of rabies,
                        raccoons and
                        > skunks are the most common carriers, but any mammal can carry
                        rabies,
                        > squirrels can and will bite people, so there is a danger, even if
                        perhaps
                        > smaller than with other animals.
                        > Taken from:
                        http://www.newton.dep.anl.gov/askasci/gen01/gen01314.htm
                        >
                        > What animals almost never have rabies? Rabbits, hamsters,
                        squirrels, chipmunks, guinea pigs, gerbils, opossums, rats, and mice
                        are hardly ever affected with rabies (Birds, fish, bugs, amphibians,
                        & reptiles don't get rabies either.) . You may still need a tetanus
                        shot or other medical care if these animals bite you.
                        > Taken from: http://pelotes.jea.com/rabies.htm
                        >
                        > Some animals, including chipmunks, gerbils, guinea pigs,
                        hamsters, mice, rabbits, rats and squirrels, rarely get rabies.
                        Birds, fish, insects, lizards, snakes and turtles never get rabies.
                        > Taken from: http://www.idph.state.il.us/public/hb/hbrabies.htm
                        >
                        > Correus
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        >






                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Kevin McDermott
                        ... saw when his opened (yes, I was holding them when they opened). Well, this is admittedly getting pretty wide of the mark vis-a-vis roman cookery: but, hey!
                        Message 11 of 17 , Jul 16, 2007
                        • 0 Attachment
                          --- In Apicius@yahoogroups.com, Correus <correus@...> wrote:
                          > We had a squirrel we raised from 4 days old. I was the first living thing he
                          saw when his opened (yes, I was holding them when they opened).

                          Well, this is admittedly getting pretty wide of the mark vis-a-vis roman cookery:
                          but, hey! the romans raised dormice in captivity and had household pets
                          (unconvincing segue/excuse...): I had a similar experience. Being the
                          neighborhood animal lovers, when a cat killed the mother of a newly-born
                          brood of 5 chipmunks, the owners brought the clutch to us (I was about 9 at
                          the time). Their eyes were still closed, of course; tiny hairless bluish lumps,
                          they were. We tried feeding them milk from a baby doll's bottle; four
                          succumbed very quickly, but the fifth survived, and yes: I was the first thing he
                          ever saw. We didn't even try to return him to the wild; he had never known
                          anything but captivity. He was a wonderful pet, and in spring would sing long,
                          elaborate and florid songs, just like a bird. The rest of the year, squeeks and
                          gibbers. Although his cage was small, he would gather up seeds, hop on the
                          exercise wheel, run like the dickens for a while, and then hide them in another
                          corner, not 18 inches from where he'd gotten them (at least to us; it might have
                          been MILES away to him...) If it weren't illegal to keep in captivity, I'd get
                          another for a pet in a second: an affectionate, clever little animal....he never
                          had a name; for whatever reason, now lost in memory, he was just called "the
                          gubby." He lived for 13 years.

                          COIVINIX, who now has to go back into the kitchen and make HAPALOS
                          ARTOS
                        • Correus
                          Hey Kevin! I hear they are fun little critters! I wish we could have kept Simon as a pet, but it is illegal here, as it is in your area. I know no one would
                          Message 12 of 17 , Jul 16, 2007
                          • 0 Attachment
                            Hey Kevin!

                            I hear they are fun little critters! I wish we could have kept Simon as a pet, but it is illegal here, as it is in your area. I know no one would have probably turned us in, but as a squirrel gets older it needs more and more room to jump and play. When we released Simon he was to the point that he could jump up onto the kitchen counter, then to the top of the fridge, and then into the light fixture in the middle of the prep area. We just couldn't risk him trying to live in something like a light fixture! LOL LOL LOL

                            Correus

                            Kevin McDermott <pncmcdermott@...> wrote:
                            --- In Apicius@yahoogroups.com, Correus <correus@...> wrote:
                            > We had a squirrel we raised from 4 days old. I was the first living thing he
                            saw when his opened (yes, I was holding them when they opened).

                            Well, this is admittedly getting pretty wide of the mark vis-a-vis roman cookery:
                            but, hey! the romans raised dormice in captivity and had household pets
                            (unconvincing segue/excuse...): I had a similar experience. Being the
                            neighborhood animal lovers, when a cat killed the mother of a newly-born
                            brood of 5 chipmunks, the owners brought the clutch to us (I was about 9 at
                            the time). Their eyes were still closed, of course; tiny hairless bluish lumps,
                            they were. We tried feeding them milk from a baby doll's bottle; four
                            succumbed very quickly, but the fifth survived, and yes: I was the first thing he
                            ever saw. We didn't even try to return him to the wild; he had never known
                            anything but captivity. He was a wonderful pet, and in spring would sing long,
                            elaborate and florid songs, just like a bird. The rest of the year, squeeks and
                            gibbers. Although his cage was small, he would gather up seeds, hop on the
                            exercise wheel, run like the dickens for a while, and then hide them in another
                            corner, not 18 inches from where he'd gotten them (at least to us; it might have
                            been MILES away to him...) If it weren't illegal to keep in captivity, I'd get
                            another for a pet in a second: an affectionate, clever little animal....he never
                            had a name; for whatever reason, now lost in memory, he was just called "the
                            gubby." He lived for 13 years.

                            COIVINIX, who now has to go back into the kitchen and make HAPALOS
                            ARTOS






                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          • Lucia Clark
                            Well, ok, I did find a baby bunny once, who could not move a leg and had been abandoned by his mother. He did survive for a few days, and watching him die in
                            Message 13 of 17 , Jul 16, 2007
                            • 0 Attachment
                              Well, ok, I did find a baby bunny once, who could not move a leg and
                              had been abandoned by his mother. He did survive for a few days, and
                              watching him die in my lap was one of the hardest things I have done.
                              Then there is the story of Tortellini, my son's hamster, who had a
                              suicidal bent and kept escaping from his cage (live free or die?). we
                              did find him a few times in the bathtub or behind the couches, until
                              one day he really disappeared.
                              About lovage seeds: I did munch on a few, even if they are really not
                              dry yet. Not half bad, with a strong lovage taste. At the moment I am
                              lolling in my mouth celery seeds (this IS dedication to the cause).
                              They release a fresh, pungent, almost minty-like aftertaste, with an
                              undertone of mild bitterness. How is that.
                              Lucia, very happy with her two Maine Coon cats.

                              At 02:05 PM 7/16/2007, you wrote:

                              >--- In <mailto:Apicius%40yahoogroups.com>Apicius@yahoogroups.com,
                              >Correus <correus@...> wrote:
                              > > We had a squirrel we raised from 4 days old. I was the first
                              > living thing he
                              >saw when his opened (yes, I was holding them when they opened).
                              >
                              >Well, this is admittedly getting pretty wide of the mark vis-a-vis
                              >roman cookery:
                              >but, hey! the romans raised dormice in captivity and had household pets
                              >(unconvincing segue/excuse...): I had a similar experience. Being the
                              >neighborhood animal lovers, when a cat killed the mother of a newly-born
                              >brood of 5 chipmunks, the owners brought the clutch to us (I was about 9 at
                              >the time). Their eyes were still closed, of course; tiny hairless
                              >bluish lumps,
                              >they were. We tried feeding them milk from a baby doll's bottle; four
                              >succumbed very quickly, but the fifth survived, and yes: I was the
                              >first thing he
                              >ever saw. We didn't even try to return him to the wild; he had never known
                              >anything but captivity. He was a wonderful pet, and in spring would
                              >sing long,
                              >elaborate and florid songs, just like a bird. The rest of the year,
                              >squeeks and
                              >gibbers. Although his cage was small, he would gather up seeds, hop on the
                              >exercise wheel, run like the dickens for a while, and then hide them
                              >in another
                              >corner, not 18 inches from where he'd gotten them (at least to us;
                              >it might have
                              >been MILES away to him...) If it weren't illegal to keep in
                              >captivity, I'd get
                              >another for a pet in a second: an affectionate, clever little
                              >animal....he never
                              >had a name; for whatever reason, now lost in memory, he was just called "the
                              >gubby." He lived for 13 years.
                              >
                              >COIVINIX, who now has to go back into the kitchen and make HAPALOS
                              >ARTOS
                              >
                              >



                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            • toast_y_toes
                              I m DEFINITELY not trying squirrel meat after that story, how cute! Would be like eating Mr Ed or Lassie! They sell chipmunks in pet shops here....but you re
                              Message 14 of 17 , Jul 17, 2007
                              • 0 Attachment
                                I'm DEFINITELY not trying squirrel meat after that story, how cute!

                                Would be like eating Mr Ed or Lassie!

                                They sell chipmunks in pet shops here....but you're right, thats
                                straying really far off the mark of cookery.

                                I'm going to avoid the doormice recipes :O)

                                --- In Apicius@yahoogroups.com, Correus <correus@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > We had a squirrel we raised from 4 days old. I was the first
                                living thing he saw when his opened (yes, I was holding them when
                                they opened). His name was Simon and he was a lot like a kitten,
                                but with a much bigger tail.
                                >
                                > It took a lot of TLC to raise him and prepare him to go back
                                into the wild. Since he had no mother, we had to help him learn how
                                to jump and climb and all that sort of stuff.
                                >
                                > It was hard when the day came for us to release him back into
                                the wild but we did. However, we were some of the lucky ones.
                                Simon did not go completely wild but would actually come to us when
                                we called. Eventually he did become more wild, but as long as we
                                were gentle and quite we could still walk up to him and feed him and
                                bet him.
                                >
                                > He would even give us little love bites, but wouldn't bite us
                                hard at all. We have had several bite us, but that was because they
                                were in pain or just plain scared.
                                >
                                > Squirrels only have a life span of 5 years in the wild, so we
                                believe he is dead now. But we do know his children are running
                                around in our trees. We thought that perhaps he was dead a couple
                                of years ago because of all the other males out there. Squirrels
                                are very territorial and the wild males in our yard did not like
                                Simon.
                                >
                                > Anyway, as I said, we thought he was dead a couple of years ago
                                because we hadn't seen him in a while. Then, one day while visiting
                                my parents (where we had found him) my wife happened to look up into
                                one of their trees and she said "Honey, there's Simon"! We couldn't
                                believe it, it WAS him!! We hadn't seen him in a year and there he
                                was, in a tree at my parents house! We walked up to the tree and
                                called up to him. He immediately came to us so we gave him a peanut
                                and some water.
                                >
                                > To this day, every once in a while we will be cleaning something
                                in the house and we will find a peanut or walnut that Simon hid in
                                the house. We even have a walnut tree growing that started as a nut
                                Simon planted in a house plant.
                                >
                                > Correus
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                > toast_y_toes <alicia_faye@...> wrote:
                                > Following the discussions on this group I went on an
                                internet search
                                > for Squirrel meat, apparently there is a group lobbying for us all
                                > to start eating Grey Squirrels, as they have pretty much
                                eradicated
                                > the native Red Squirrel population here in the UK...so far I can't
                                > find anyone who's doing it though.
                                >
                                > http://www.newsandstar.co.uk/news/viewarticle.aspx?id=347278
                                >
                                > Luckily Rabies has been wiped out here, but they look feisty
                                little
                                > fellas, don't think i'd like a bite from one regardless ;o)
                                >
                                > --- In Apicius@yahoogroups.com, Correus <correus@> wrote:
                                > >
                                > > Um...
                                > >
                                > > The wife and I rehabilitate small animals and our specialty are
                                > squirrels.
                                > >
                                > > Please look at the following information before you start
                                > thinking al squirrels are rabid.
                                > >
                                > > Small Wild Animal Bites: Rodents such as mice, rats, moles,
                                > gophers, chipmunks, prairie dogs and rabbits fortunately are
                                > considered free of rabies. Squirrels rarely carry rabies, but have
                                > not transmitted it to humans.
                                > > Taken form:
                                > http://www.sflpp.com/ParentCare/AnimalOrHumanBite.html
                                > >
                                > > No. Squirrels are not a primary threat of transfer of rabies,
                                > raccoons and
                                > > skunks are the most common carriers, but any mammal can carry
                                > rabies,
                                > > squirrels can and will bite people, so there is a danger, even
                                if
                                > perhaps
                                > > smaller than with other animals.
                                > > Taken from:
                                > http://www.newton.dep.anl.gov/askasci/gen01/gen01314.htm
                                > >
                                > > What animals almost never have rabies? Rabbits, hamsters,
                                > squirrels, chipmunks, guinea pigs, gerbils, opossums, rats, and
                                mice
                                > are hardly ever affected with rabies (Birds, fish, bugs,
                                amphibians,
                                > & reptiles don't get rabies either.) . You may still need a
                                tetanus
                                > shot or other medical care if these animals bite you.
                                > > Taken from: http://pelotes.jea.com/rabies.htm
                                > >
                                > > Some animals, including chipmunks, gerbils, guinea pigs,
                                > hamsters, mice, rabbits, rats and squirrels, rarely get rabies.
                                > Birds, fish, insects, lizards, snakes and turtles never get
                                rabies.
                                > > Taken from: http://www.idph.state.il.us/public/hb/hbrabies.htm
                                > >
                                > > Correus
                                > >
                                > >
                                > >
                                > >
                                > >
                                > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                > >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                >
                              Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.