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Dining in Pompeii

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  • Samantha
    Thursday, May 31, 2007 In Pompeii eat like it s A.D. 79 until June 26 Researchers have tried to bring back to life the city s food chain by replanting, in the
    Message 1 of 13 , Jul 4, 2007
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      Thursday, May 31, 2007
      In Pompeii eat like it's A.D. 79 until June 26


      Researchers have tried to bring back to life the city's food chain by
      replanting, in the restaurant's garden and in other open spaces
      throughout the city's ruins, the fruits and vegetables that were part
      of the Roman diet -- figs and olives, plums and grapes, as well as
      broom, bramble, poppy and mallow.

      Kits with the ingredients will be sold to visitors in the area around
      the restaurant with instructions on how to cook their own Roman
      specialties. Although there will be no cooking on the site, visitors
      will be directed to a local restaurant where some of the specialties
      will be offered.

      "We wanted to learn what the inhabitants of Pompeii ate,'' said Anna
      Maria Ciarallo, a biologist who heads the project for Pompeii's
      archaeological office. "But we wanted a side of the project to appeal
      directly to the public as well.''

      Some may keep away from "garum,'' a pungent sauce used for flavoring
      and obtained by fermenting fish entrails, but Ciarallo said that many
      Roman dishes closely resembled modern cuisine.

      The recipe to make prosciutto ham has remained unchanged, while
      "savillum,'' the favorite dessert of many Romans, was a baked cream
      similar to today's custard, Ciarallo said.

      Pompeii's rich were known to feast on such exotic dishes as swallow's
      tongue and parrot meat, but the project is presenting more everyday
      fare, Ciarallo said.

      The restaurant was located between the gymnasium, the amphitheater and
      one of the city's gates and mostly catered to middle-class merchants
      and travelers, Ciarallo said.

      Its six benches were probably always filled with hungry customers
      passing through the busy neighborhood, she said. The guests would
      recline on one side on the benches, as eating customs demanded at the
      time, to chat, play dice -- one of the Romans' favorite pastimes --
      and partake of the dishes served out of large pots. The quiche-like
      "libum'' is made with bread, laurel leaves and cheese resembling
      today's ricotta.

      "It was a sweet and sour cuisine, which blended the sharp tastes of
      vinegar and spices with the sugars of honey and figs,'' Ciarallo said.
      Cereals and beans were the staples of the Roman diet, together with
      fish, cheese and limited quantities of eggs and meat.



      "The main differences were between the social classes,'' she said.

      Slaves were kept on a high-energy diet of bread, dried-fruits and low
      quality cheese and wine. The upper classes enjoyed the same foods
      available to the middle class, but the quantities were larger, the
      ingredients finer, and the banquets were lavish presentations.
      The project will shut down on June 26 because of lack of funds...

      Some recipes prepared in ancient Pompeii:

      Peaches with Cumin
      Can be an appetizer or a dessert.
      Peel and chop up some firm peaches
      Cover peaches in a cumin sauce made with ground pepper, parsley, mint
      leaves, cumin, honey, vinegar and a dash of garum, which is a fish
      sauce made from fish entrails steeped in brine. A modern-day version
      of garum, "colatura di alici'' or anchovy juice, is still produced on
      the Amalfi coast.

      Celery Dessert
      Chop celery, roast the pieces in an oven.
      Serve with honey and ground pepper.

      Pork with Dried Figs and Cheese Side Dish
      Boil a fresh pork shoulder with dried figs and bay leaves.
      Carve off the rind, cover in pastry and bake in a hot oven.
      For side dish, mix different types of herbs into fresh ricotta-like
      cheese, add some olive oil and serve with sesame seeds or hazelnuts.

      -- Associated Press
    • geranioj@aol.com
      What about dormice?? Sounds really gross? Joe ... From: Samantha To: Apicius@yahoogroups.com Sent: Wed, 4 Jul 2007 8:40 am Subject:
      Message 2 of 13 , Jul 4, 2007
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        What about dormice?? Sounds really gross?

        Joe







        -----Original Message-----
        From: Samantha <neversam@...>
        To: Apicius@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Wed, 4 Jul 2007 8:40 am
        Subject: [Apicius] Dining in Pompeii

























        Thursday, May 31, 2007

        In Pompeii eat like it's A.D. 79 until June 26



        Researchers have tried to bring back to life the city's food chain by

        replanting, in the restaurant's garden and in other open spaces

        throughout the city's ruins, the fruits and vegetables that were part

        of the Roman diet -- figs and olives, plums and grapes, as well as

        broom, bramble, poppy and mallow.



        Kits with the ingredients will be sold to visitors in the area around

        the restaurant with instructions on how to cook their own Roman

        specialties. Although there will be no cooking on the site, visitors

        will be directed to a local restaurant where some of the specialties

        will be offered.



        "We wanted to learn what the inhabitants of Pompeii ate,'' said Anna

        Maria Ciarallo, a biologist who heads the project for Pompeii's

        archaeological office. "But we wanted a side of the project to appeal

        directly to the public as well.''



        Some may keep away from "garum,'' a pungent sauce used for flavoring

        and obtained by fermenting fish entrails, but Ciarallo said that many

        Roman dishes closely resembled modern cuisine.



        The recipe to make prosciutto ham has remained unchanged, while

        "savillum,'' the favorite dessert of many Romans, was a baked cream

        similar to today's custard, Ciarallo said.



        Pompeii's rich were known to feast on such exotic dishes as swallow's

        tongue and parrot meat, but the project is presenting more everyday

        fare, Ciarallo said.



        The restaurant was located between the gymnasium, the amphitheater and

        one of the city's gates and mostly catered to middle-class merchants

        and travelers, Ciarallo said.



        Its six benches were probably always filled with hungry customers

        passing through the busy neighborhood, she said. The guests would

        recline on one side on the benches, as eating customs demanded at the

        time, to chat, play dice -- one of the Romans' favorite pastimes --

        and partake of the dishes served out of large pots. The quiche-like

        "libum'' is made with bread, laurel leaves and cheese resembling

        today's ricotta.



        "It was a sweet and sour cuisine, which blended the sharp tastes of

        vinegar and spices with the sugars of honey and figs,'' Ciarallo said.

        Cereals and beans were the staples of the Roman diet, together with

        fish, cheese and limited quantities of eggs and meat.



        "The main differences were between the social classes,'' she said.



        Slaves were kept on a high-energy diet of bread, dried-fruits and low

        quality cheese and wine. The upper classes enjoyed the same foods

        available to the middle class, but the quantities were larger, the

        ingredients finer, and the banquets were lavish presentations.

        The project will shut down on June 26 because of lack of funds...



        Some recipes prepared in ancient Pompeii:



        Peaches with Cumin

        Can be an appetizer or a dessert.

        Peel and chop up some firm peaches

        Cover peaches in a cumin sauce made with ground pepper, parsley, mint

        leaves, cumin, honey, vinegar and a dash of garum, which is a fish

        sauce made from fish entrails steeped in brine. A modern-day version

        of garum, "colatura di alici'' or anchovy juice, is still produced on

        the Amalfi coast.



        Celery Dessert

        Chop celery, roast the pieces in an oven.

        Serve with honey and ground pepper.



        Pork with Dried Figs and Cheese Side Dish

        Boil a fresh pork shoulder with dried figs and bay leaves.

        Carve off the rind, cover in pastry and bake in a hot oven.

        For side dish, mix different types of herbs into fresh ricotta-like

        cheese, add some olive oil and serve with sesame seeds or hazelnuts.



        -- Associated Press

















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        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • J. May
        Dormouse is an endangered species today. It s a fat, arboreal, rat-like creature in what I ve read. I m not sure which arboreal creature to substitute, or
        Message 3 of 13 , Jul 9, 2007
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          Dormouse is an endangered species today. It's a "fat, arboreal, rat-like
          creature" in what I've read. I'm not sure which arboreal creature to
          substitute, or which are available from a willing butcher. There are a
          few women who have substituted chicken, with the idea that all funky
          meats taste like chicken anyway. :)

          Samia

          geranioj@... wrote:
          > What about dormice?? Sounds really gross?
          >
          > Joe
          >
        • toast_y_toes
          I Find Boned Chicken thighs are quite good, as they are about doormouse size, and can be stuffed easily, I can t imagine that Doormice have a very strong
          Message 4 of 13 , Jul 12, 2007
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            I Find Boned Chicken thighs are quite good, as they are about
            doormouse size, and can be stuffed easily, I can't imagine that
            Doormice have a very strong flavour, so perhaps Chicken is the closest
            approximation. :o)



            -- In Apicius@yahoogroups.com, "J. May" <jmay@...> wrote:
            >
            > Dormouse is an endangered species today. It's a "fat, arboreal, rat-
            like
            > creature" in what I've read. I'm not sure which arboreal creature to
            > substitute, or which are available from a willing butcher. There are
            a
            > few women who have substituted chicken, with the idea that all funky
            > meats taste like chicken anyway. :)
            >
            > Samia
            >
            > geranioj@... wrote:
            > > What about dormice?? Sounds really gross?
            > >
            > > Joe
            > >
            >
          • Correus
            Have you tried the common squirrel? Correus toast_y_toes wrote: I Find Boned Chicken thighs are quite good, as they are about
            Message 5 of 13 , Jul 12, 2007
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              Have you tried the common squirrel?

              Correus

              toast_y_toes <alicia_faye@...> wrote:
              I Find Boned Chicken thighs are quite good, as they are about
              doormouse size, and can be stuffed easily, I can't imagine that
              Doormice have a very strong flavour, so perhaps Chicken is the closest
              approximation. :o)

              -- In Apicius@yahoogroups.com, "J. May" <jmay@...> wrote:
              >
              > Dormouse is an endangered species today. It's a "fat, arboreal, rat-
              like
              > creature" in what I've read. I'm not sure which arboreal creature to
              > substitute, or which are available from a willing butcher. There are
              a
              > few women who have substituted chicken, with the idea that all funky
              > meats taste like chicken anyway. :)
              >
              > Samia
              >
              > geranioj@... wrote:
              > > What about dormice?? Sounds really gross?
              > >
              > > Joe
              > >
              >






              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Correus
              Have you tried the common squirrel? Correus toast_y_toes wrote: I Find Boned Chicken thighs are quite good, as they are about
              Message 6 of 13 , Jul 12, 2007
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                Have you tried the common squirrel?

                Correus

                toast_y_toes <alicia_faye@...> wrote:
                I Find Boned Chicken thighs are quite good, as they are about
                doormouse size, and can be stuffed easily, I can't imagine that
                Doormice have a very strong flavour, so perhaps Chicken is the closest
                approximation. :o)

                -- In Apicius@yahoogroups.com, "J. May" <jmay@...> wrote:
                >
                > Dormouse is an endangered species today. It's a "fat, arboreal, rat-
                like
                > creature" in what I've read. I'm not sure which arboreal creature to
                > substitute, or which are available from a willing butcher. There are
                a
                > few women who have substituted chicken, with the idea that all funky
                > meats taste like chicken anyway. :)
                >
                > Samia
                >
                > geranioj@... wrote:
                > > What about dormice?? Sounds really gross?
                > >
                > > Joe
                > >
                >






                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • toast_y_toes
                Unfortunately (?) not, living in the city centre isn t conducive to brandishing an air rifle around :o) and they certainly don t sell it around here, what s it
                Message 7 of 13 , Jul 12, 2007
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                  Unfortunately (?) not, living in the city centre isn't conducive to
                  brandishing an air rifle around :o) and they certainly don't sell it
                  around here, what's it like?


                  --- In Apicius@yahoogroups.com, Correus <correus@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Have you tried the common squirrel?
                  >
                  > Correus
                  >
                  > toast_y_toes <alicia_faye@...> wrote:
                  > I Find Boned Chicken thighs are quite good, as they are
                  about
                  > doormouse size, and can be stuffed easily, I can't imagine that
                  > Doormice have a very strong flavour, so perhaps Chicken is the
                  closest
                  > approximation. :o)
                  >
                  > -- In Apicius@yahoogroups.com, "J. May" <jmay@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > Dormouse is an endangered species today. It's a "fat, arboreal,
                  rat-
                  > like
                  > > creature" in what I've read. I'm not sure which arboreal
                  creature to
                  > > substitute, or which are available from a willing butcher. There
                  are
                  > a
                  > > few women who have substituted chicken, with the idea that all
                  funky
                  > > meats taste like chicken anyway. :)
                  > >
                  > > Samia
                  > >
                  > > geranioj@ wrote:
                  > > > What about dormice?? Sounds really gross?
                  > > >
                  > > > Joe
                  > > >
                  > >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                • Correus
                  Well, it s kind of hard to describe....not really sure HOW to describe it. It can be as delicate as chicken, yet rich & earthy. Depending on how it is fixed
                  Message 8 of 13 , Jul 12, 2007
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                    Well, it's kind of hard to describe....not really sure HOW to describe it. It can be as delicate as chicken, yet rich & earthy. Depending on how it is fixed it can be either tough or smooth and buttery. The older the squirrel is the tougher it gets, that much I do know.

                    Some specialty butchers and meat shops carry farm raised squirrel.

                    Correus

                    toast_y_toes <alicia_faye@...> wrote:
                    Unfortunately (?) not, living in the city centre isn't conducive to
                    brandishing an air rifle around :o) and they certainly don't sell it
                    around here, what's it like?

                    --- In Apicius@yahoogroups.com, Correus <correus@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Have you tried the common squirrel?
                    >
                    > Correus
                    >
                    > toast_y_toes <alicia_faye@...> wrote:
                    > I Find Boned Chicken thighs are quite good, as they are
                    about
                    > doormouse size, and can be stuffed easily, I can't imagine that
                    > Doormice have a very strong flavour, so perhaps Chicken is the
                    closest
                    > approximation. :o)
                    >
                    > -- In Apicius@yahoogroups.com, "J. May" <jmay@> wrote:
                    > >
                    > > Dormouse is an endangered species today. It's a "fat, arboreal,
                    rat-
                    > like
                    > > creature" in what I've read. I'm not sure which arboreal
                    creature to
                    > > substitute, or which are available from a willing butcher. There
                    are
                    > a
                    > > few women who have substituted chicken, with the idea that all
                    funky
                    > > meats taste like chicken anyway. :)
                    > >
                    > > Samia
                    > >
                    > > geranioj@ wrote:
                    > > > What about dormice?? Sounds really gross?
                    > > >
                    > > > Joe
                    > > >
                    > >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >






                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • ranvaig@columbus.rr.com
                    ... You could make false dormice. We did these once with ground chicken. http://www.panix.com/~nexus/cooking/cc34.shtml Ranvaig
                    Message 9 of 13 , Jul 12, 2007
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                      >Unfortunately (?) not, living in the city centre isn't conducive to
                      >brandishing an air rifle around :o) and they certainly don't sell it
                      >around here, what's it like?Yahoo! Groups Links
                      >
                      You could make false dormice. We did these once with ground chicken.
                      http://www.panix.com/~nexus/cooking/cc34.shtml

                      Ranvaig
                    • Aurelia Coritana
                      ... What about a really fat hamster? -Aurelia
                      Message 10 of 13 , Jul 12, 2007
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                        --- In Apicius@yahoogroups.com, Correus <correus@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Have you tried the common squirrel?
                        >
                        > Correus

                        What about a really fat hamster?
                        -Aurelia
                      • toast_y_toes
                        See, I always think of the commonal garedn dormouse when I think of them, but edible ones are much bigger aren t they, i keep imagining Romans stuffing these
                        Message 11 of 13 , Jul 13, 2007
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                          See, I always think of the commonal garedn dormouse when I think of
                          them, but edible ones are much bigger aren't they, i keep imagining
                          Romans stuffing these tiny little bite size things!

                          I've not seen Squirrel meat anywhere in the UK, but i'll keep an eye
                          out, Is it in any way similar to tender Rabbit?


                          --- In Apicius@yahoogroups.com, "Aurelia Coritana"
                          <aurelia_coritana@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > --- In Apicius@yahoogroups.com, Correus <correus@> wrote:
                          > >
                          > > Have you tried the common squirrel?
                          > >
                          > > Correus
                          >
                          > What about a really fat hamster?
                          > -Aurelia
                          >
                        • Correus
                          Not sure...never heard of tender rabbit! LOL It is similar to the wild rabbit, IMHO anyway. Maybe a little richer. Correus toast_y_toes
                          Message 12 of 13 , Jul 13, 2007
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                            Not sure...never heard of tender rabbit! LOL

                            It is similar to the wild rabbit, IMHO anyway. Maybe a little richer.

                            Correus

                            toast_y_toes <alicia_faye@...> wrote:
                            See, I always think of the commonal garedn dormouse when I think of
                            them, but edible ones are much bigger aren't they, i keep imagining
                            Romans stuffing these tiny little bite size things!

                            I've not seen Squirrel meat anywhere in the UK, but i'll keep an eye
                            out, Is it in any way similar to tender Rabbit?

                            --- In Apicius@yahoogroups.com, "Aurelia Coritana"
                            <aurelia_coritana@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > --- In Apicius@yahoogroups.com, Correus <correus@> wrote:
                            > >
                            > > Have you tried the common squirrel?
                            > >
                            > > Correus
                            >
                            > What about a really fat hamster?
                            > -Aurelia
                            >






                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          • Lucia Clark
                            Well, the doormice in Italian translates as Ghiro, and it is an animal roughly 10 inches long, with a tail just as long, chubby and with a very long
                            Message 13 of 13 , Jul 14, 2007
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                              Well, the doormice in Italian translates as Ghiro, and it is an
                              animal roughly 10 inches long, with a tail just as long, chubby and
                              with a very long hibernation period, which made it an ideal small
                              food supply to keep in household jars. I would think rabbit meat
                              could be a good substitute, unless one wants to go hunt squirrels or
                              wild bunnies you can see pictures
                              at http://www.fotosearch.com/JNB002/00089993/
                              cheers
                              Lucia



                              At 09:04 AM 7/13/2007, you wrote:

                              >Not sure...never heard of tender rabbit! LOL
                              >
                              >It is similar to the wild rabbit, IMHO anyway. Maybe a little richer.
                              >
                              >Correus
                              >
                              >toast_y_toes
                              ><<mailto:alicia_faye%40hotmail.com>alicia_faye@...> wrote:
                              >See, I always think of the commonal garedn dormouse when I think of
                              >them, but edible ones are much bigger aren't they, i keep imagining
                              >Romans stuffing these tiny little bite size things!
                              >
                              >I've not seen Squirrel meat anywhere in the UK, but i'll keep an eye
                              >out, Is it in any way similar to tender Rabbit?
                              >
                              >--- In <mailto:Apicius%40yahoogroups.com>Apicius@yahoogroups.com,
                              >"Aurelia Coritana"
                              ><aurelia_coritana@...> wrote:
                              > >
                              > > --- In <mailto:Apicius%40yahoogroups.com>Apicius@yahoogroups.com,
                              > Correus <correus@> wrote:
                              > > >
                              > > > Have you tried the common squirrel?
                              > > >
                              > > > Correus
                              > >
                              > > What about a really fat hamster?
                              > > -Aurelia
                              > >
                              >
                              >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              >
                              >



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