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CINNVS

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  • Correus
    SALVETE OMNES! Following is an e-mail I received the other day from another Roman group. I meant to pass it along but forgot to do it. Does the drink
    Message 1 of 5 , Feb 14, 2007
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      SALVETE OMNES!

      Following is an e-mail I received the other day from another Roman group. I meant to pass it along but forgot to do it. Does the drink 'CINNVS' mentioned in the e-mail ring a bell with any of you? I have italicized the e-mail.

      The Word of the Day for February 08 is:

      concinnity \kun-SIH-nuh-tee\ noun harmony or elegance of design especially of literary style in adaptation of parts to a whole or to each other

      Example sentence: Julia maintains that no modern play can rival the concinnity of the
      classical Greek tragedies.

      Did you know?

      The Romans apparently found perfect harmony in a well-mixed drink. The cocktail in question was a beverage they called "cinnus," and so agreeably concordant did they find it that its name apparently inspired the formation of "concinnare," a verb meaning "to place fitly together." "Concinnare" gave rise to "concinnus," meaning "skillfully put together," which in turn fermented into "concinnitas." English speakers added the word to our mix in the 1500s as "concinnity."

      *Indicates the sense illustrated in the example sentence


      VALETE
      CORREVS·APPIVS·IVLIANVS·APICIVS

      The truth may be boring, and even unpleasant: But it is always better than half truths and out right lies ~ Tw Moran








      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • jdm314@aol.com
      L&S says that cinnus was something like cyceon, made of spelt (i.e. emmer), but I can t seem to track down the primary sources it cites to get more
      Message 2 of 5 , Feb 14, 2007
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        L&S says that cinnus was something like cyceon, made of "spelt" (i.e.
        emmer), but I can't seem to track down the primary sources it cites to
        get more information.

        JDM

        -----Original Message-----
        From: correus@...
        To: apicius@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Wed, 14 Feb 2007 16:33:01 -0800 (PST)
        Subject: [Apicius] CINNVS

        SALVETE OMNES!

        Following is an e-mail I received the other day from another Roman
        group. I meant to pass it along but forgot to do it. Does the drink
        'CINNVS' mentioned in the e-mail ring a bell with any of you? I have
        italicized the e-mail.

        The Word of the Day for February 08 is:

        concinnity \kun-SIH-nuh-tee\ noun harmony or elegance of design
        especially of literary style in adaptation of parts to a whole or to
        each other

        Example sentence: Julia maintains that no modern play can rival the
        concinnity of the
        classical Greek tragedies.

        Did you know?

        The Romans apparently found perfect harmony in a well-mixed drink. The
        cocktail in question was a beverage they called "cinnus," and so
        agreeably concordant did they find it that its name apparently inspired
        the formation of "concinnare," a verb meaning "to place fitly
        together." "Concinnare" gave rise to "concinnus," meaning "skillfully
        put together," which in turn fermented into "concinnitas." English
        speakers added the word to our mix in the 1500s as "concinnity."

        *Indicates the sense illustrated in the example sentence

        VALETE
        CORREVS·APPIVS·IVLIANVS·APICIVS

        The truth may be boring, and even unpleasant: But it is always better
        than half truths and out right lies ~ Tw Moran

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






        ________________________________________________________________________
        Check out the new AOL. Most comprehensive set of free safety and
        security tools, free access to millions of high-quality videos from
        across the web, free AOL Mail and more.
        =0
      • jdm314@aol.com
        Oh, cancel that: Arnobius (? — ca. 330 CE), Adversus Nationes, 5.25.3: Igitur Baubo illa, quam incolam diximus Eleusinii fuisse pagi, malis multiformibus
        Message 3 of 5 , Feb 14, 2007
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          Oh, cancel that:

          Arnobius (? — ca. 330 CE), Adversus Nationes, 5.25.3:

          Igitur Baubo illa, quam incolam diximus Eleusinii fuisse pagi, malis
          multiformibus fatigatam accipit hospitio Cererem, adulatur obsequiis
          mitibus, reficiendi corporis rogat curam ut habeat, sitientis ardori
          oggerit potionem cinni, cyceonem quam nuncupat Graecia: aversatur et
          respuit humanitatis officia maerens dea nec eam fortuna perpetitur
          valetudinis meminisse communis.

          "So this Baubo, who we mentioned was an inhabitant of the Eleusinian
          region, fatigued by multifarious ills, takes Ceres in as a guest, fawns
          on her with tender flattery, and asks that she should be taken care of,
          in order to restore her body, and treats her burning thirst with
          cinnus, which Greece refers to as cyceon. The distraught goddess pours
          it out, and violently rejects the duties of kindness, and fortune does
          not allow her to remember the common health."

          Don't have time to read up on the context, but this seems to be an
          account of the mysteries. As the author is clearly Christian, this
          would be done to discredit them.

          JDM

          -----Original Message-----
          From: correus@...
          To: apicius@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Wed, 14 Feb 2007 16:33:01 -0800 (PST)
          Subject: [Apicius] CINNVS

          SALVETE OMNES!

          Following is an e-mail I received the other day from another Roman
          group. I meant to pass it along but forgot to do it. Does the drink
          'CINNVS' mentioned in the e-mail ring a bell with any of you? I have
          italicized the e-mail.

          The Word of the Day for February 08 is:

          concinnity \kun-SIH-nuh-tee\ noun harmony or elegance of design
          especially of literary style in adaptation of parts to a whole or to
          each other

          Example sentence: Julia maintains that no modern play can rival the
          concinnity of the
          classical Greek tragedies.

          Did you know?

          The Romans apparently found perfect harmony in a well-mixed drink. The
          cocktail in question was a beverage they called "cinnus," and so
          agreeably concordant did they find it that its name apparently inspired
          the formation of "concinnare," a verb meaning "to place fitly
          together." "Concinnare" gave rise to "concinnus," meaning "skillfully
          put together," which in turn fermented into "concinnitas." English
          speakers added the word to our mix in the 1500s as "concinnity."

          *Indicates the sense illustrated in the example sentence

          VALETE
          CORREVS·APPIVS·IVLIANVS·APICIVS

          The truth may be boring, and even unpleasant: But it is always better
          than half truths and out right lies ~ Tw Moran

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






          ________________________________________________________________________
          Check out the new AOL. Most comprehensive set of free safety and
          security tools, free access to millions of high-quality videos from
          across the web, free AOL Mail and more.
          =0
        • Correus
          Interesting...wonder what this CINNVS is that would have created such a reaction. jdm314@aol.com wrote: Oh, cancel that: Arnobius (? — ca. 330 CE),
          Message 4 of 5 , Feb 15, 2007
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            Interesting...wonder what this CINNVS is that would have created such a reaction.

            jdm314@... wrote: Oh, cancel that:

            Arnobius (? — ca. 330 CE), Adversus Nationes, 5.25.3:

            Igitur Baubo illa, quam incolam diximus Eleusinii fuisse pagi, malis
            multiformibus fatigatam accipit hospitio Cererem, adulatur obsequiis
            mitibus, reficiendi corporis rogat curam ut habeat, sitientis ardori
            oggerit potionem cinni, cyceonem quam nuncupat Graecia: aversatur et
            respuit humanitatis officia maerens dea nec eam fortuna perpetitur
            valetudinis meminisse communis.

            "So this Baubo, who we mentioned was an inhabitant of the Eleusinian
            region, fatigued by multifarious ills, takes Ceres in as a guest, fawns
            on her with tender flattery, and asks that she should be taken care of,
            in order to restore her body, and treats her burning thirst with
            cinnus, which Greece refers to as cyceon. The distraught goddess pours
            it out, and violently rejects the duties of kindness, and fortune does
            not allow her to remember the common health."

            Don't have time to read up on the context, but this seems to be an
            account of the mysteries. As the author is clearly Christian, this
            would be done to discredit them.

            JDM

            -----Original Message-----
            From: correus@...
            To: apicius@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Wed, 14 Feb 2007 16:33:01 -0800 (PST)
            Subject: [Apicius] CINNVS

            SALVETE OMNES!

            Following is an e-mail I received the other day from another Roman
            group. I meant to pass it along but forgot to do it. Does the drink
            'CINNVS' mentioned in the e-mail ring a bell with any of you? I have
            italicized the e-mail.

            The Word of the Day for February 08 is:

            concinnity \kun-SIH-nuh-tee\ noun harmony or elegance of design
            especially of literary style in adaptation of parts to a whole or to
            each other

            Example sentence: Julia maintains that no modern play can rival the
            concinnity of the
            classical Greek tragedies.

            Did you know?

            The Romans apparently found perfect harmony in a well-mixed drink. The
            cocktail in question was a beverage they called "cinnus," and so
            agreeably concordant did they find it that its name apparently inspired
            the formation of "concinnare," a verb meaning "to place fitly
            together." "Concinnare" gave rise to "concinnus," meaning "skillfully
            put together," which in turn fermented into "concinnitas." English
            speakers added the word to our mix in the 1500s as "concinnity."

            *Indicates the sense illustrated in the example sentence

            VALETE
            CORREVS·APPIVS·IVLIANVS·APICIVS

            The truth may be boring, and even unpleasant: But it is always better
            than half truths and out right lies ~ Tw Moran

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

            __________________________________________________________
            Check out the new AOL. Most comprehensive set of free safety and
            security tools, free access to millions of high-quality videos from
            across the web, free AOL Mail and more.
            =0





            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • jdm314@aol.com
            ... created such a reaction. Well, doubt there was anythign wrong with the cinnus itself (though it is often assumed that at the Eleusinian Mysteries people
            Message 5 of 5 , Feb 15, 2007
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              > Interesting...wonder what this CINNVS is that would have
              created such a reaction.

              Well, doubt there was anythign wrong with the cinnus itself (though it
              is often assumed that at the Eleusinian Mysteries people drank
              hallucinogenic cyceon). Keep in mind that this story is tied in to the
              myth of the Kidnapping of Proserpina (Persephone). Recall that her
              mother Ceres (Demeter) goes a little crazy because she is so upset by
              her daughter's disappearence.

              JDM
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