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Re: [Apicius] Re: Fish sauce question....

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  • P. Dominus Antonius
    The other thing that is nice to do is find one that is not made with sugar. Some of the Philippine brands are sugar free and are more often made with other
    Message 1 of 9 , Jan 26, 2007
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      The other thing that is nice to do is find one that is not made with sugar.
      Some of the Philippine brands are sugar free and are more often made with
      other fish. I bought a case of one made with just mackerel and salt. The
      flavor was much more subtle than the anchovy varieties.
      --
      >|P. Dominus Antonius|<
      Tony Dah m

      Si vis pacem, para bellum - Vegetius
      Mahometismus religio pacis, nex omnibus dissidentibus.


      On 1/25/07, Samantha <neversam@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hi,
      >
      > Fish sauce does not go bad so if you're finding oxidation in your mixture,
      > it's from the
      > wine. If not tightly, sealed the water will evaporate out of the fish
      > sauce making it
      > stonger. Just add a little water to correct.
      >
      > I was once stationed in Vietnam and recently spent a month in
      > Thailand. I've also cooked
      > professionalky. I always use Tiparo brand, which it turns out is also
      > Emeril's choice. Ming
      > Tsai, another TV chef, prefers 3 Crabs Brand. Oyster Brand should be
      > available in almost
      > any Oriental market.
      >
      > It's important to note that despite being named for various sea creatures,
      > nearly all fish
      > sauces are made only with salted anchovies. As was true with garum, there
      > are sauces
      > made from other sea creatures (I have one made with crabs) but they are
      > hard to find and
      > much more expensive.
      >
      > Servillia
      >


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    • sallygrain@aol.com
      Hi I do dispute that - it does spoil and becomes less pleasant to cook with if left exposed to the air and if it was just about evaporation then the finished
      Message 2 of 9 , Jan 29, 2007
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        Hi

        I do dispute that - it does spoil and becomes less pleasant to cook with if
        left exposed to the air and if it was just about evaporation then the
        finished Roman sauce would taste ok but it doesn't.
        Also garum is not made from anchovy - liquamen is made from anchovy -
        garum is made from the blood and viscera of certain fish particulary mackerel .
        You make the mistake of thinking that garum is the generic term for fish
        sauce. It is often used that way by modern commentators particularly
        archaeologists but it was not used generically by the users(cooks) and producers in the
        ancient world.

        sally


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Correus
        AMEN! Well said Sally!!!! Correus sallygrain@aol.com wrote: Hi I do dispute that - it does spoil and becomes less pleasant to cook with if left exposed to the
        Message 3 of 9 , Jan 29, 2007
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          AMEN! Well said Sally!!!!



          Correus

          sallygrain@... wrote:
          Hi

          I do dispute that - it does spoil and becomes less pleasant to cook with if
          left exposed to the air and if it was just about evaporation then the
          finished Roman sauce would taste ok but it doesn't.
          Also garum is not made from anchovy - liquamen is made from anchovy -
          garum is made from the blood and viscera of certain fish particulary mackerel .
          You make the mistake of thinking that garum is the generic term for fish
          sauce. It is often used that way by modern commentators particularly
          archaeologists but it was not used generically by the users(cooks) and producers in the
          ancient world.

          sally

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]












          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • P. Dominus Antonius
          I was unaware of the firm distinction between liquamen and garum. However having tasted fermented sauces from both I agree that there is a real difference.
          Message 4 of 9 , Jan 30, 2007
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            I was unaware of the firm distinction between liquamen and garum. However
            having tasted fermented sauces from both I agree that there is a real
            difference. The garum/mackerel is much nicer. Of course a Roman might not
            approve of my putting it on a quesadilla.
            --
            >|P. Dominus Antonius|<
            Tony Dah m

            Si vis pacem, para bellum - Vegetius
            Mahometismus religio pacis, nex omnibus dissidentibus.


            On 1/29/07, sallygrain@... <sallygrain@...> wrote:
            >
            > Hi
            >
            > I do dispute that - it does spoil and becomes less pleasant to cook with
            > if
            > left exposed to the air and if it was just about evaporation then the
            > finished Roman sauce would taste ok but it doesn't.
            > Also garum is not made from anchovy - liquamen is made from anchovy -
            > garum is made from the blood and viscera of certain fish
            > particulary mackerel .
            > You make the mistake of thinking that garum is the generic term for fish
            > sauce. It is often used that way by modern commentators particularly
            > archaeologists but it was not used generically by the users(cooks) and
            > producers in the
            > ancient world.
            >
            > sally
            >
            >


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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