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Re: [Apicius] Barley recipes

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  • Michael Weingarten
    Sheila Your barley recipe sounds delicious, but it would not do at all for a seder . Karpas is a green vegetable, something like parsley or celery which can be
    Message 1 of 7 , Dec 30, 2006
      Sheila

      Your barley recipe sounds delicious, but it would not do at all for a seder . Karpas is a green vegetable, something like parsley or celery which can be dipped in salt water. (In Russia they used potatoes because the tops were green, and they had nothing else after the winter!)
      You would not be allowed to eat barley soaked then cooked, (or wheat or any of the five cereals) because soaking might lead to fermenting, and making the cereal leaven, which is the forbidden thing on Passover.

      I guess your source must have mixed up kali, parched corn, with karpas, greens!

      best
      Susan
      Susan Weingarten
      Tel-Aviv University
      Fax: 972-3-5346066
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Sheila Michaels
      To: Apicius@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Thursday, December 28, 2006 7:16 AM
      Subject: Re: [Apicius] Barley recipes


      I don't know if this qualifies, but this is how I approximate
      "karpas" in the seder menu. I soak barley overnight (longer if I can
      keep it from spoiling), until it is plumped. Then I parch it in a
      hot iron pan, or over the fire. This makes it rather nutty, both
      crisp outside & softened inside. I encourage people to sprinkle it
      on salad, as well as eating a spoonful as part of the Passover seder.
      S h e i l a

      On Dec 21, 2006, at 11:03 AM, P. Dominus Antonius wrote:

      > Roman soldiers were disciplined by putting them on barley rations.
      > I am
      > interested in recipes or advice on how to cook barley in porridge,
      > in bread,
      > etc. As they were on discipline it is unlikely they would have
      > access to
      > items like honey and such to improve the taste. Apparently the
      > barley was
      > hated, so I doubt they were able to prepare anything terribly
      > appealing.
      >
      > Any ideas anyone?
      >
      > --
      > >|P. Dominus Antonius|<
      > Tony Dah m
      >
      > Si vis pacem, para bellum - Vegetius
      > Mahometismus religio pacis, nex omnibus dissentint.
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >

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    • Sheila Michaels
      Dear Susan: Karpos simply means fruit-bearing. Nothing really to do with a green vegetable. That s a construct by people at a loss to know what karpas
      Message 2 of 7 , Jan 4, 2007
        Dear Susan:
        "Karpos" simply means fruit-bearing. Nothing really to do with a
        green vegetable. That's a construct by people at a loss to know what
        "karpas" meant, because it's Greek, & so, what to put on the table.

        Bitter herbs (appropriate to the time of year) are already on the
        table. Celery & parsley are not really seasonally appropriate, are
        redundant as a vegetable & do not bear fruit, that I know of.

        The barley plant is bearing fruit at the Passover season, & my
        interpretation is that this is the Karpas intended. Passover marks
        the beginning of the barley harvest, & the Omer is a sheaf (of
        barley), which was offered at the Temple from the Sabbath after
        Passover until Shevuoth. Leviticus 23:14 does say that you shall eat
        neither bread, nor green grain, nor parched until you have made the
        offering. I offer the parched barley not because I wish to flout the
        law, but because the seder is the Passover offering, & the table has
        matzo (which is a bread, risen or not) & parched barley by way of
        marking the making of that offering. My seder is a work in progress,
        as you see.


        S h e i l a



        On Dec 31, 2006, at 1:41 AM, Michael Weingarten wrote:

        > Sheila
        >
        > Your barley recipe sounds delicious, but it would not do at all for
        > a seder . Karpas is a green vegetable, something like parsley or
        > celery which can be dipped in salt water. (In Russia they used
        > potatoes because the tops were green, and they had nothing else
        > after the winter!)
        > You would not be allowed to eat barley soaked then cooked, (or
        > wheat or any of the five cereals) because soaking might lead to
        > fermenting, and making the cereal leaven, which is the forbidden
        > thing on Passover.
        >
        > I guess your source must have mixed up kali, parched corn, with
        > karpas, greens!
        >
        > best
        > Susan
        > Susan Weingarten
        > Tel-Aviv University
        > Fax: 972-3-5346066
        > ----- Original Message -----
        > From: Sheila Michaels
        > To: Apicius@yahoogroups.com
        > Sent: Thursday, December 28, 2006 7:16 AM
        > Subject: Re: [Apicius] Barley recipes
        >
        > I don't know if this qualifies, but this is how I approximate
        > "karpas" in the seder menu. I soak barley overnight (longer if I can
        > keep it from spoiling), until it is plumped. Then I parch it in a
        > hot iron pan, or over the fire. This makes it rather nutty, both
        > crisp outside & softened inside. I encourage people to sprinkle it
        > on salad, as well as eating a spoonful as part of the Passover seder.
        > S h e i l a
        >
        > On Dec 21, 2006, at 11:03 AM, P. Dominus Antonius wrote:
        >
        > > Roman soldiers were disciplined by putting them on barley rations.
        > > I am
        > > interested in recipes or advice on how to cook barley in porridge,
        > > in bread,
        > > etc. As they were on discipline it is unlikely they would have
        > > access to
        > > items like honey and such to improve the taste. Apparently the
        > > barley was
        > > hated, so I doubt they were able to prepare anything terribly
        > > appealing.
        > >
        > > Any ideas anyone?
        > >
        > > --
        > > >|P. Dominus Antonius|<
        > > Tony Dah m
        > >
        > > Si vis pacem, para bellum - Vegetius
        > > Mahometismus religio pacis, nex omnibus dissentint.
        > >
        > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        > >
        > >
        > >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        > +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
        > This Mail Was Scanned By Mail-seCure System
        > at the Tel-Aviv University CC.
        >
        > ----------------------------------------------------------
        > I am using the free version of SPAMfighter for private users.
        > It has removed 2521 spam emails to date.
        > Paying users do not have this message in their emails.
        > Try SPAMfighter for free now!
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        >
        >
        >



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