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Re: Oleander

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  • gkbagne
    From Lepella, to All Salvete! Someone asked why put poisonous oleander in a garden? . I grew up in California, where it was planted extensively along roads
    Message 1 of 9 , Dec 1, 2006
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      From Lepella, to All Salvete!
      Someone asked 'why put poisonous oleander in a garden?'. I grew up in
      California, where it was planted extensively along roads during the
      depression. My mother, a Calif. native who was a child at the time,
      told me that oleander was put in to keep the dustbowel refugees and
      hoboes from stopping for the night. It's a very draught tolerant plant
      and can be quite spectacular when you are passing miles of 7 foot
      blooming bushes along the freeway.
      I have also heard that there was a mead made by Spanish monks in which
      some oleander honey was used that gave a heady buzz. It sounds no
      crazier than toxic blowfish sushi.
      Valete!
    • Lucia Clark
      Probably the drought tolerance had something to do with it. A bush in a public garden that does not require water in the summer months has its advantages.
      Message 2 of 9 , Dec 1, 2006
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        Probably the drought tolerance had something to do with it. A bush in
        a public garden that does not require water in the summer months has
        its advantages. Another plant widely used was the ricino, ricinus
        communis, quite beautiful but even more poisonous.
        Buzzy honey, eh? Those monks! The honey must have been quite safe,
        except for the hangover. I wonder....Can we see if the villas that
        had Oleanders in the gardens had also beehives and mead equipment?

        Lucia

        At 10:22 AM 12/1/2006, you wrote:

        > From Lepella, to All Salvete!
        >Someone asked 'why put poisonous oleander in a garden?'. I grew up in
        >California, where it was planted extensively along roads during the
        >depression. My mother, a Calif. native who was a child at the time,
        >told me that oleander was put in to keep the dustbowel refugees and
        >hoboes from stopping for the night. It's a very draught tolerant plant
        >and can be quite spectacular when you are passing miles of 7 foot
        >blooming bushes along the freeway.
        >I have also heard that there was a mead made by Spanish monks in which
        >some oleander honey was used that gave a heady buzz. It sounds no
        >crazier than toxic blowfish sushi.
        >Valete!
        >
        >

        ----------



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • jdm314@aol.com
        Ricinus communis is usually called the Caster Oil Plant in English--Somewhat odd that the oil has the primary name, not the plant. When European explorers
        Message 3 of 9 , Dec 1, 2006
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          Ricinus communis is usually called the "Caster Oil Plant" in
          English--Somewhat odd that the oil has the primary name, not the plant.

          When European explorers wrote home about the new flora they found in
          the Americas, often by comparing them (sometimes aptly, sometimes less
          so) to European plants. I saw somewhere a reference to the chile pepper
          as a "ricinus americanus" -- though peppers and caster oil are not
          particularly close, taxonomically.

          JDM

          -----Original Message-----
          From: luciaclark@...
          To: Apicius@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Fri, 1 Dec 2006 6:08 PM
          Subject: Re: [Apicius] Re: Oleander

          Probably the drought tolerance had something to do with it. A
          bush in
          a public garden that does not require water in the summer months has
          its advantages. Another plant widely used was the ricino, ricinus
          communis, quite beautiful but even more poisonous.
          Buzzy honey, eh? Those monks! The honey must have been quite safe,
          except for the hangover. I wonder....Can we see if the villas that
          had Oleanders in the gardens had also beehives and mead equipment?

          Lucia

          At 10:22 AM 12/1/2006, you wrote:

          > From Lepella, to All Salvete!
          >Someone asked 'why put poisonous oleander in a garden?'. I grew up in
          >California, where it was planted extensively along roads during the
          >depression. My mother, a Calif. native who was a child at the time,
          >told me that oleander was put in to keep the dustbowel refugees and
          >hoboes from stopping for the night. It's a very draught tolerant plant
          >and can be quite spectacular when you are passing miles of 7 foot
          >blooming bushes along the freeway.
          >I have also heard that there was a mead made by Spanish monks in which
          >some oleander honey was used that gave a heady buzz. It sounds no
          >crazier than toxic blowfish sushi.
          >Valete!
          >
          >

          ----------

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






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        • Lucia Clark
          Oh, so that is what Caster oil is. Olio di ricino. The seed, as big as a bean, is very toxic, causing blisters and swelling. Maybe that s the effect that
          Message 4 of 9 , Dec 1, 2006
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            Oh, so that is what Caster oil is. Olio di ricino. The seed, as big
            as a bean, is very toxic, causing blisters and swelling. Maybe that's
            the effect that biting into chile pepper produces? I bit into a chili
            (only once) and I was sure I had lost all my gums, sinuses and
            Eustachian tubes.So perhaps the effect caused the name?
            Lucia


            At 08:13 PM 12/1/2006, you wrote:

            >Ricinus communis is usually called the "Caster Oil Plant" in
            >English--Somewhat odd that the oil has the primary name, not the plant.
            >
            >When European explorers wrote home about the new flora they found in
            >the Americas, often by comparing them (sometimes aptly, sometimes less
            >so) to European plants. I saw somewhere a reference to the chile pepper
            >as a "ricinus americanus" -- though peppers and caster oil are not
            >particularly close, taxonomically.
            >
            >JDM
            >
            >-----Original Message-----
            >From: <mailto:luciaclark%40luciadentice.com>luciaclark@...
            >To: <mailto:Apicius%40yahoogroups.com>Apicius@yahoogroups.com
            >Sent: Fri, 1 Dec 2006 6:08 PM
            >Subject: Re: [Apicius] Re: Oleander
            >
            >Probably the drought tolerance had something to do with it. A
            >bush in
            >a public garden that does not require water in the summer months has
            >its advantages. Another plant widely used was the ricino, ricinus
            >communis, quite beautiful but even more poisonous.
            >Buzzy honey, eh? Those monks! The honey must have been quite safe,
            >except for the hangover. I wonder....Can we see if the villas that
            >had Oleanders in the gardens had also beehives and mead equipment?
            >
            >Lucia
            >
            >At 10:22 AM 12/1/2006, you wrote:
            >
            > > From Lepella, to All Salvete!
            > >Someone asked 'why put poisonous oleander in a garden?'. I grew up in
            > >California, where it was planted extensively along roads during the
            > >depression. My mother, a Calif. native who was a child at the time,
            > >told me that oleander was put in to keep the dustbowel refugees and
            > >hoboes from stopping for the night. It's a very draught tolerant plant
            > >and can be quite spectacular when you are passing miles of 7 foot
            > >blooming bushes along the freeway.
            > >I have also heard that there was a mead made by Spanish monks in which
            > >some oleander honey was used that gave a heady buzz. It sounds no
            > >crazier than toxic blowfish sushi.
            > >Valete!
            > >
            > >
            >
            >----------
            >
            >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >__________________________________________________________
            >Check out the new AOL. Most comprehensive set of free safety and
            >security tools, free access to millions of high-quality videos from
            >across the web, free AOL Mail and more.
            >



            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Kevin McDermott
            COIVINIX·D·F·PIST·LUCIÆ·DENT·CLERICÆ·SAL·P·D ... Castor oil has a long (and continuing) history as a medicament, and can still be bought off the
            Message 5 of 9 , Dec 1, 2006
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              COIVINIX·D·F·PIST·LUCIÆ·DENT·CLERICÆ·SAL·P·D
              --- In Apicius@yahoogroups.com, Lucia Clark <luciaclark@...> wrote:
              > Oh, so that is what Caster oil is. Olio di ricino. The seed, as big
              > as a bean, is very toxic, causing blisters and swelling.

              Castor oil has a long (and continuing) history as a medicament, and can still
              be bought off the shelf in any drugstore. It is primarily used to treat
              constipation and as an emetic (i.e., an agent producing vomiting). It is toxic, in
              rather large doses, but "very toxic" is quite an overstatement. The TRULY very
              toxic substance RICIN is derived from the castor bean as well--and was used
              by the Russian secret service in the good old days (Gyorgy Markov) before
              they went all high-tech with plutonium. This is a substance you will NOT see
              on the drugstore shelf.

              Of interest to you, perhaps, Lucia, is that Castor Oil apparently had a strong
              connection with Italian Fascism...any interested in the bean, the drug, the
              poison, and Mussolini can find out what they'd like to know here:
              <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Castor_oil>

              VALE
            • Lucia Clark
              Oh yes, this is a bit OT, but I grew up with stories of olio di ricino, by the quart, forced on dissidents. The film Amarcord as a clip of it. So, about
              Message 6 of 9 , Dec 2, 2006
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                Oh yes, this is a bit OT, but I grew up with
                stories of olio di ricino, by the quart, forced
                on dissidents. The film Amarcord as a clip of it.
                So, about Garum.....
                Lucia



                At 01:34 AM 12/2/2006, you wrote:

                >COIVINIX·D·F·PIST·LUCIÆ·DENT·CLERICÆ·SAL·P·D
                >--- In
                ><mailto:Apicius%40yahoogroups.com>Apicius@yahoogroups.com,
                >Lucia Clark <luciaclark@...> wrote:
                > > Oh, so that is what Caster oil is. Olio di ricino. The seed, as big
                > > as a bean, is very toxic, causing blisters and swelling.
                >
                >Castor oil has a long (and continuing) history as a medicament, and can still
                >be bought off the shelf in any drugstore. It is primarily used to treat
                >constipation and as an emetic (i.e., an agent
                >producing vomiting). It is toxic, in
                >rather large doses, but "very toxic" is quite an
                >overstatement. The TRULY very
                >toxic substance RICIN is derived from the castor bean as well--and was used
                >by the Russian secret service in the good old days (Gyorgy Markov) before
                >they went all high-tech with plutonium. This is a substance you will NOT see
                >on the drugstore shelf.
                >
                >Of interest to you, perhaps, Lucia, is that
                >Castor Oil apparently had a strong
                >connection with Italian Fascism...any interested in the bean, the drug, the
                >poison, and Mussolini can find out what they'd like to know here:
                ><<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Castor_oil>http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Castor_oil>
                >
                >VALE
                >
                >

                ----------



                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • jdm314@aol.com
                ... Hey, I like garum as much as the next guy, but I think it is inhumane to make dissidents drink it by the quart ;) Vale.
                Message 7 of 9 , Dec 2, 2006
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                  Scripsit Lucia:
                  > Oh yes, this is a bit OT, but I grew up with
                  > stories of olio di ricino, by the quart, forced
                  > on dissidents. The film Amarcord as a clip of it.
                  > So, about Garum.....

                  Hey, I like garum as much as the next guy, but I think it is inhumane
                  to make dissidents drink it by the quart ;)

                  Vale.

                  ________________________________________________________________________
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                • Lucia Clark
                  Very funny. But the pain and humiliation of countless people has remained with me, even if I was the only one of my family who did not live through it. And
                  Message 8 of 9 , Dec 2, 2006
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                    Very funny. But the pain and humiliation of countless people has
                    remained with me, even if I was the only one of my family who did not
                    live through it. And today Italy's "centro-destra"was mobilized
                    nation-wide. We never learn, do we.
                    So, for my Saturnalia party next week, I think I am making for sure
                    sausages in fava beans, tripe in white sauce, herbed mayonnaise over
                    cold meats, beside some pedestrian things like maccheroni. And
                    Panettone, of course
                    Ciao
                    Lucia



                    At 04:46 PM 12/2/2006, you wrote:

                    >Scripsit Lucia:
                    > > Oh yes, this is a bit OT, but I grew up with
                    > > stories of olio di ricino, by the quart, forced
                    > > on dissidents. The film Amarcord as a clip of it.
                    > > So, about Garum.....
                    >
                    >Hey, I like garum as much as the next guy, but I think it is inhumane
                    >to make dissidents drink it by the quart ;)
                    >
                    >Vale.
                    >
                    >__________________________________________________________
                    >Check out the new AOL. Most comprehensive set of free safety and
                    >security tools, free access to millions of high-quality videos from
                    >across the web, free AOL Mail and more.
                    >
                    >

                    ----------



                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • P. Dominus Antonius
                    Not to be a stickler but wasn t it polonium? A few years ago I tried to get castor beans because I had heard that moles don t like them if you grind them up a
                    Message 9 of 9 , Dec 7, 2006
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                      Not to be a stickler but wasn't it polonium?

                      A few years ago I tried to get castor beans because I had heard that moles
                      don't like them if you grind them up a scatter them around the yard. After
                      having called around and talked to several possible suppliers, one finally
                      advised me to drop the project before I got myself in trouble with Homeland
                      Security.

                      Of course moles probably don't like polonium either.
                      --
                      >|P. Dominus Antonius|<
                      Tony Dah m

                      Si vis pacem, para bellum - Vegetius
                      Mahometismus religio pacis, nex omnibus dissentint.



                      On 12/2/06, Kevin McDermott <pncmcdermott@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > COIVINIX嵯幹感IST微UCIこDENT嵩LERICこSAL感嵯
                      > --- In Apicius@yahoogroups.com, Lucia Clark <luciaclark@...> wrote:
                      > > Oh, so that is what Caster oil is. Olio di ricino. The seed, as big
                      > > as a bean, is very toxic, causing blisters and swelling.
                      >
                      > Castor oil has a long (and continuing) history as a medicament, and can
                      > still
                      > be bought off the shelf in any drugstore. It is primarily used to treat
                      > constipation and as an emetic (i.e., an agent producing vomiting). It is
                      > toxic, in
                      > rather large doses, but "very toxic" is quite an overstatement. The TRULY
                      > very
                      > toxic substance RICIN is derived from the castor bean as well--and was
                      > used
                      > by the Russian secret service in the good old days (Gyorgy Markov) before
                      > they went all high-tech with plutonium. This is a substance you will NOT
                      > see
                      > on the drugstore shelf.
                      >
                      > Of interest to you, perhaps, Lucia, is that Castor Oil apparently had a
                      > strong
                      > connection with Italian Fascism...any interested in the bean, the drug,
                      > the
                      > poison, and Mussolini can find out what they'd like to know here:
                      > <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Castor_oil>
                      >
                      > VALE
                      >


                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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