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Re: Camp cooking

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  • JSA
    ... Sure we do. We know what crops and foodstuffs and spices were available to them. Some of this is found in archaeological digs, others in court records, or
    Message 1 of 24 , Sep 6, 1999
      --- LrdRas@... wrote:
      > From: LrdRas@...
      >
      > In a message dated 9/6/99 1:57:52 PM Eastern
      > Daylight Time,
      > varromurena@... writes:
      >
      > << I'm not talking feasts
      > here, just normal daily meals.
      >
      > L. Licinius Varro Murena >>
      >
      > OK. Understood. Unfortunately we little or no
      > documentation of what peasants
      > ate during most periods of history before the
      > 1800's CE. :-(

      Sure we do. We know what crops and foodstuffs and
      spices were available to them. Some of this is found
      in archaeological digs, others in court records, or
      literary references. We know a great deal about how
      peasants lived before 1800 AD.

      L. Licinius Varro Murena
      __________________________________________________
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    • CeltSarah@xxx.xxx
      In a message dated 9/6/99 12:45:09 PM Mountain Daylight Time, hrjones@socrates.berkeley.edu writes:
      Message 2 of 24 , Sep 6, 1999
        In a message dated 9/6/99 12:45:09 PM Mountain Daylight Time,
        hrjones@... writes:

        << If you cover absolutely everyting before AD 500, and have a particular
        interest in the Near East, you might want to track down a couple of books
        I've played with on occasion:
        >>

        this is great, do you mind if I post it on our antiquitus list as well?

        Sarah
        http://members.aol.com/agamedes
      • LrdRas@xxx.xxx
        In a message dated 9/6/99 3:00:39 PM Eastern Daylight Time, varromurena@yahoo.com writes:
        Message 3 of 24 , Sep 6, 1999
          In a message dated 9/6/99 3:00:39 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
          varromurena@... writes:

          << We know a great deal about how
          peasants lived before 1800 AD. >>

          No disagreement here. I agree that we know a great deal about how they lived.
          We know what was grown, etc., but we know little or nothing about what they
          ate. That is we have little or no knowledge of how they prepared their food,
          e.g., no recipes. The extant body of actual recipes that have survived were
          written for the wealthy and the nobility. It does not reflect the style of
          food that the common Joe ate.

          If you have recipes attributable to peasants before 1800 CE then I would be
          happy to see them as I have none in my collection. Recipes before 1450 CE
          would be especially welcome.

          Ras
        • hrjones@xxxxxxxx.xxxxxxxx.xxxx
          ... Go ahead -- I neglected to mention that the first two (the Hittite and Mesopotamian books) are in the UC Berkeley library, so those with ILL access may be
          Message 4 of 24 , Sep 6, 1999
            On Mon, 6 Sep 1999 CeltSarah@... wrote:

            > In a message dated 9/6/99 12:45:09 PM Mountain Daylight Time,
            > hrjones@... writes:
            >
            > << If you cover absolutely everyting before AD 500, and have a particular
            > interest in the Near East, you might want to track down a couple of books
            > I've played with on occasion:
            > >>
            >
            > this is great, do you mind if I post it on our antiquitus list as well?

            Go ahead -- I neglected to mention that the first two (the Hittite and
            Mesopotamian books) are in the UC Berkeley library, so those with ILL
            access may be able to get them that way, if not another.

            *********************************************************
            Heather Rose Jones hrjones@...
            **********************************************************
          • terelleterry@xxxxx.xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx)
            discovery magazine did a fine article on the intimate relationship between bread and beer. their attempts at reproducing ancient recepies was instructive. or
            Message 5 of 24 , Sep 6, 1999
              discovery magazine did a fine article on the intimate relationship
              between bread and beer. their attempts at reproducing ancient recepies
              was instructive. or was it scientific american?

              according to my information iron cooing vessels and beans were not used
              in northern europe until late 12th century at which time the iron
              deficiencies of the women were eliminated, leading to a surplus of
              women for the first time.

              food and culture are intimately associated.
              also, if you can't grow it trade for it or steal it, you can't eat it.

              have you used spelt and kamut? i have combined them alone and with many
              other flours.

              i suspect the romans would try just about
              anything once. surely in their travels they
              ate local food in their far flung empire.

              the word lox appears to antedate sanskrit, coming from the original
              indoeuropean root language.
            • JSA
              ... You may wish to check out: Norman J. G. Pounds, _Hearth & Home: A History of Material Culture_ (Indian UP, 1989), especially pp. 205-210 on cookery and
              Message 6 of 24 , Sep 6, 1999
                --- terelle terry <terelleterry@...> wrote:
                > From: terelleterry@... (terelle terry)
                >
                > according to my information iron cooking vessels and
                > beans were not used
                > in northern europe until late 12th century at which
                > time the iron
                > deficiencies of the women were eliminated, leading
                > to a surplus of
                > women for the first time.
                >

                You may wish to check out: Norman J. G. Pounds,
                _Hearth & Home: A History of Material Culture_ (Indian
                UP, 1989), especially pp. 205-210 on cookery and
                cooking.

                Also, try the Online Reference Book for Medieval
                Studies (ORB) which has a number of interesting
                articles and sources for the entire medieval period:
                http://orb.rhodes.edu/

                L. Licinius Varro Murena
                __________________________________________________
                Do You Yahoo!?
                Bid and sell for free at http://auctions.yahoo.com
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