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Re: Garum/Introduction/beans

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  • Jeffery Helmers
    Dear Marco; Would you happen to know of a mail order source for bottarga? I have seen it mention as an endangered foodstuff by the slowfood group in Italy. I
    Message 1 of 3 , Jul 1, 1999
    • 0 Attachment
      Dear Marco;
      Would you happen to know of a mail order source for bottarga? I have seen it
      mention as an endangered foodstuff by the slowfood group in Italy.
      I found many of your comments interesting. I think trying to re-imagine
      Roman cuisine solely based on Apicius will ultimately be frustrating as some
      one trying to recreate 20th century cooking based on books on haute cuisine.
      The common foods are apt to be forgotten.
      I remember a great line from Martial that went on the order of "with pale
      beans bubbling on the hearth, I may decline the invitations of emperors."
      But I recall no simple recipe from Apicius for beans.
      Vale
      Jeff


      >From: Marco Berni <marco.berni@...>
      >Reply-To: Apicius@onelist.com
      >To: Apicius@onelist.com
      >Subject: Re: [Apicius] Garum/Introduction
      >Date: Wed, 30 Jun 1999 16:15:32 +0200
      >
      >Jeff,
      >
      >Bottarga is indeed the dried, salted roe of either tuna or mackerel, the
      >latter
      >being the most highly prized (and priced). It is sold either dried whole
      >in
      >its membrane, occasionally wrapped in wax and often ready grated in jars.
      >
      >It is an ancient product of Sardinian origin and is used grated to top
      >spaghetti with the addition of olive oil and sometimes chopped parsley.
      >
      >I also has other garnishing/flavouring uses in the island's cooking most of
      >which are not used on the mainland.
      >
      >As to whether the Romans had it or not, you an be sure they had dried fish
      >roe
      >given that this was the most common method of preserving fresh fish or
      >meat. A
      >roman delicatessen would have had strings of salami's, dried 'parma' style
      >hams, fresh and aged sheeps, goats and cow's milk cheeses, fresh cheeses
      >like
      >mozzarella, ricotta and stracchino. Indeed it would look very familiar to
      >most
      >Italians.
      >
      >On another matter, the great question of did the Romans have Pasta? This
      >is
      >addressed fully in an excellent and compelling arguement by Stefano
      >Millioni.
      >Visit the link available through my Roman food page at:
      >http://www.ancientsites.com/~Caius_Livius/
      >
      >Vale!
      >
      >Marco
      >
      >Jeffery Helmers wrote:
      >
      > > From: Jeffery Helmers <jhelmers@...>
      > >
      > > Dear Marco (and others on this list);
      > > I have been wondering about the antiquity of bartaga (excuse my
      >spelling,
      > > but what I mean is dried roe of tuna or other fish) It always struck me
      >as
      > > something the Romans might have enjoyed, but I remember no reference to
      >it.
      > > Jeff Helmers
      > >
      > > >From: Marco Berni <marco.berni@...>
      > > >Reply-To: Apicius@onelist.com
      > > >To: Apicius@onelist.com
      > > >Subject: Re: [Apicius] Garum/Introduction
      > > >Date: Tue, 29 Jun 1999 20:59:36 +0200
      > > >
      > > >From: Marco Berni <marco.berni@...>
      > > >
      > > >Rachel,
      > > >
      > > >I am probably going to ignite some controversy here but I do not agree
      >that
      > > >Nuoc mam and garum are the same thing at all.
      > > >
      > > >Nuoc mam is basically a fish based soy sauce originally made by
      >fermenting
      > > >anchovies in brine. Today it is often made with concentrated extracts
      >that
      > > >are
      > > >then diluted, the resulting sauce is very watery and quite like fishy
      >soy
      > > >sauce. Most eastern cuisines have a sauce of this sort; the chinese
      >have
      > > >fish
      > > >soy, the thai's also have a variant as do the Malays and so on.
      > > >
      > > >Garum or liquamen has many recipes according to who you read, it is
      > > >alternately
      > > >made from whole fish, fish livers or fish guts and blood depending on
      >who's
      > > >description you read. This is then layered alternately with lots of
      >salt
      > > >and
      > > >herbs of various sorts again depending on who's recipe you use. The
      > > >container
      > > >is then sealed and left to macerate NOT ROT as is commonly thought, it
      >is
      > > >impossible for the contents to rot due to the large amount of salt
      >present.
      > > >What happens is that the fish liquefy over time as the coarse salt
      >melts
      > > >and a
      > > >thick lumpy brine is formed. This is then strained either finely or
      > > >coarsely
      > > >depending on the use it is intended for.
      > > >
      > > >My reasoning is based on the following:
      > > >
      > > >I am Roman, I was born in the city am 34 years old and live there today
      > > >though
      > > >I have lived much of my life in the UK. I am a restaurateur and chef
      >and
      > > >have
      > > >an extensive knowledge of Italian cuisine as well as being trained in
      > > >classical
      > > >french, modern British, Chinese, Japanese and Thai.
      > > >
      > > >Italian regional cuisine is very ancient in its origins, many dishes
      >that
      > > >are
      > > >eaten today in Rome on the tables of the ordinary citizens and in the
      >Roman
      > > >campagna (not the restaurants which barring a few exceptions are
      > > >bastardized
      > > >and atypical) bear a great resemblance to those eaten by the ordinary
      > > >citizens
      > > >of Rome two millennia ago. Certainly new ingredients have been added
      >(most
      > > >notably the tomato and chilli pepper) as they have been discovered over
      >the
      > > >centuries but the basic style of the food remains the same. The crux
      >of
      > > >the
      > > >matter is this; if garum was indeed as essential an ingredient in Roman
      > > >cuisine
      > > >as we are told by ancient texts then it is very likely that it would
      >remain
      > > >in
      > > >the Roman diet in some prominent form today (much as soy sauce and Nuoc
      >mam
      > > >being very ancient still feature prominently in the far east). The
      >fact
      > > >that
      > > >Italy has no Nuoc mam type sauce today nor has it had in living memory
      > > >leads me
      > > >to conclude that garum cannot have been a sauce like nuoc mam or it
      >would
      > > >remain in use today; not just in Italy but in Spain, Greece and North
      > > >Africa,
      > > >it is simply impossible for such an important ingredient to have
      > > >disappeared
      > > >from all of these countries without trace.
      > > >
      > > >What does remain in all of these countries is an enormous production of
      > > >anchovies and other 'pesci azzurri' (sardines, mackerel etc.). These
      >are
      > > >produced in canned form via salting and then packing with olive oil and
      > > >sometimes herbs and also as pureed form in tubes for simplified use in
      > > >cooking. Anchovies are used extensively in mediterranean cuisine to
      >impart
      > > >salty 'sea' flavour to food, they are sometimes used in stews and
      >soups,
      > > >often
      > > >used in saut�ed clams and other seafood, they are used in salad
      >dressings
      > > >and
      > > >chopped in salads and on top of pizzas, wrapped around olives and
      >capers,
      > > >put
      > > >on hard boiled eggs and so on and so on. As you can see they are very
      > > >important today. It is my opinion that garum is the ancestor of the
      >salted
      > > >anchovy whether whole, filleted, pureed or in herbs; at some point
      > > >production
      > > >changed to a less liquefied product, possibly due to reduced production
      > > >period,
      > > >faster transport or maybe just a change in tastes.
      > > >
      > > >Anyway, that's my opinion for what its worth, accept it or not its up
      >to
      > > >you.
      > > >But I will tell you one thing, try sprinkling nuoc mam on a endive
      >salad
      > > >and
      > > >then making one using the recipe I suggest below. Bet you never use
      >the
      > > >nuoc
      > > >mam again. (remember when using it as a dressing to add a olive oil and
      > > >wine
      > > >vinegar plus pepper to taste.)
      > > >
      > > >Below is a recipe from Gargilius Martialis 3rd C AD as published in the
      > > >excellent book "A Cena da Lucullo" by Ilaria Gozzini Giacosa (published
      >in
      > > >English as "A Taste of Ancient Rome") plus a quick and clean variation
      >that
      > > >I
      > > >have developed myself from a modern day Roman salad dressing.
      > > >
      > > >Garum (Gargilius Martialis 3C AD)
      > > >Use fresh fatty fish e.g.. anchovies, sardines or mackerel.
      > > >Dried aromatic herbs such as: dill, coriander, fennel, celery seed,
      >mint,
      > > >oregano and rosemary.
      > > >Coarse sea salt
      > > >
      > > >Clean and wash the fish removing heads fins and guts if desired. (the
      >guts
      > > >impart a bitter flavour) Taking a large preserving or pickling jar (the
      > > >wider
      > > >the better) place a generous layer of herbs on the the bottom of the
      >jar
      > > >then
      > > >place a layer of fish on the top (cutting the fish into sections if it
      >is
      > > >large) placing them fairly tightly packed.
      > > >
      > > >Over this add a layer of coarse sea salt (must be sea salt) about 3/4
      >inch
      > > >thick! Repeat these three layers till you have filled the jar to the
      >top.
      > > >
      > > >Let the container rest in the sun for seven days (this is the
      >traditional
      > > >way).
      > > >Then mix the sauce daily for a further twenty days. After that time it
      > > >becomes
      > > >a liquid and can be filtered if necessary.
      > > >
      > > >Here is a quickish clean garum of my own:
      > > >
      > > >6 tubes of anchovy paste, (or 12 small tins of anchovy fillets drained
      >and
      > > >liquidized)
      > > >1/2 teaspoon of each of the above herbs but fresh if possible.
      > > >1 clove of Garlic (crush it with the side of a knife)
      > > >Pepper
      > > >Good olive oil
      > > >Wine vinegar
      > > >
      > > >Finely chop the herbs and place in a bowl. Add the anchovy paste, add
      >the
      > > >crushed garlic clove, ground black pepper (the quantity will dictate
      >the
      > > >'hotness' of the garum) a little vinegar and the olive oil, mix well
      >(in a
      > > >blender if necessary)
      > > >
      > > >The resulting sauce should pour easily, if not add more oil or white
      >wine
      > > >if
      > > >you like. Store in the fridge for a day before use and always shake
      >well
      > > >before
      > > >adding to recipes. Use sparingly as it is salty and often replaces
      >salt in
      > > >recipes. Makes an excellent dressing for lettuce and rocket salads,
      >the
      > > >traditional Roman hors d'oeuvre and is used in Rome today to dress
      > > >"puntarelle"
      > > >a salad leaf from the dandelion family that has been eaten in and
      >around
      > > >Rome
      > > >for more than 2,000 years.
      > > >
      > > >Enjoy!
      > > >
      > > >P.S. If you should keel over with food poisoning after trying the
      >ancient
      > > >recipe I deny any responsibility! :)
      > > >
      > > >Marco Berni
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >"Holliday, Rachel {DISC~Welwyn}" wrote:
      > > >
      > > > > From: "Holliday, Rachel {DISC~Welwyn}" <RACHEL.HOLLIDAY@...>
      > > > >
      > > > > Hello
      > > > > I've just joined this list mailing because I enjoy food and have an
      > > >interest
      > > > > in the culinary techniques that have been used over time. I don't
      >know
      > > >if
      > > > > I'll be able to contribute too much as my interest has been
      > > > > medieval/renaissance up to now. But I am reading.
      > > > >
      > > > > First question:
      > > > > I recently found a recipe requiring garum. I have no idea what this
      >is
      > > > > please could someone explain.
      > > > > Thank you
      > > > > Rachel
      > > > >
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      > > > >
      >------------------------------------------------------------------------
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      >http://www.home.ch/~spaw1087/orgy
      > > >
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      >http://www.home.ch/~spaw1087/orgy
      > >
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    • Marco Berni
      Jeff, I don t I am afraid, living in Italy as I do I just buy it at the alimentare or the supermarket (not the best stuff though). I am not sure I want to make
      Message 2 of 3 , Jul 1, 1999
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        Jeff,

        I don't I am afraid, living in Italy as I do I just buy it at the alimentare or
        the supermarket (not the best stuff though).

        I am not sure I want to make this offer, as it might back-fire on me, but if
        you are interested and don't think US (your are from US no?) customs sniffer
        dogs won't go ape at the smell I could find out how much it would cost to send
        some over.

        Vale!

        Marco

        ps. There are some recipes for legumes in both Edwards and Giacosa's book that
        may be worth a look, but as with all things literary, there is no was that you
        would catch a 2nd Century writer recording how to boil beans or cook basic
        pasta as these foods were to 'dull' for their intended audience. Hence the
        fact that everyone now thinks all Romans ate dormice and figpeckers, rather
        than as was the case, only those too wealthy to know what to do with their
        money. Nouvelle cuisine anyone?

        Jeffery Helmers wrote:

        > From: Jeffery Helmers <jhelmers@...>
        >
        > Dear Marco;
        > Would you happen to know of a mail order source for bottarga? I have seen it
        > mention as an endangered foodstuff by the slowfood group in Italy.
        > I found many of your comments interesting. I think trying to re-imagine
        > Roman cuisine solely based on Apicius will ultimately be frustrating as some
        > one trying to recreate 20th century cooking based on books on haute cuisine.
        > The common foods are apt to be forgotten.
        > I remember a great line from Martial that went on the order of "with pale
        > beans bubbling on the hearth, I may decline the invitations of emperors."
        > But I recall no simple recipe from Apicius for beans.
        > Vale
        > Jeff
        >
        > >From: Marco Berni <marco.berni@...>
        > >Reply-To: Apicius@onelist.com
        > >To: Apicius@onelist.com
        > >Subject: Re: [Apicius] Garum/Introduction
        > >Date: Wed, 30 Jun 1999 16:15:32 +0200
        > >
        > >Jeff,
        > >
        > >Bottarga is indeed the dried, salted roe of either tuna or mackerel, the
        > >latter
        > >being the most highly prized (and priced). It is sold either dried whole
        > >in
        > >its membrane, occasionally wrapped in wax and often ready grated in jars.
        > >
        > >It is an ancient product of Sardinian origin and is used grated to top
        > >spaghetti with the addition of olive oil and sometimes chopped parsley.
        > >
        > >I also has other garnishing/flavouring uses in the island's cooking most of
        > >which are not used on the mainland.
        > >
        > >As to whether the Romans had it or not, you an be sure they had dried fish
        > >roe
        > >given that this was the most common method of preserving fresh fish or
        > >meat. A
        > >roman delicatessen would have had strings of salami's, dried 'parma' style
        > >hams, fresh and aged sheeps, goats and cow's milk cheeses, fresh cheeses
        > >like
        > >mozzarella, ricotta and stracchino. Indeed it would look very familiar to
        > >most
        > >Italians.
        > >
        > >On another matter, the great question of did the Romans have Pasta? This
        > >is
        > >addressed fully in an excellent and compelling arguement by Stefano
        > >Millioni.
        > >Visit the link available through my Roman food page at:
        > >http://www.ancientsites.com/~Caius_Livius/
        > >
        > >Vale!
        > >
        > >Marco
        > >
        > >Jeffery Helmers wrote:
        > >
        > > > From: Jeffery Helmers <jhelmers@...>
        > > >
        > > > Dear Marco (and others on this list);
        > > > I have been wondering about the antiquity of bartaga (excuse my
        > >spelling,
        > > > but what I mean is dried roe of tuna or other fish) It always struck me
        > >as
        > > > something the Romans might have enjoyed, but I remember no reference to
        > >it.
        > > > Jeff Helmers
        > > >
        > > > >From: Marco Berni <marco.berni@...>
        > > > >Reply-To: Apicius@onelist.com
        > > > >To: Apicius@onelist.com
        > > > >Subject: Re: [Apicius] Garum/Introduction
        > > > >Date: Tue, 29 Jun 1999 20:59:36 +0200
        > > > >
        > > > >From: Marco Berni <marco.berni@...>
        > > > >
        > > > >Rachel,
        > > > >
        > > > >I am probably going to ignite some controversy here but I do not agree
        > >that
        > > > >Nuoc mam and garum are the same thing at all.
        > > > >
        > > > >Nuoc mam is basically a fish based soy sauce originally made by
        > >fermenting
        > > > >anchovies in brine. Today it is often made with concentrated extracts
        > >that
        > > > >are
        > > > >then diluted, the resulting sauce is very watery and quite like fishy
        > >soy
        > > > >sauce. Most eastern cuisines have a sauce of this sort; the chinese
        > >have
        > > > >fish
        > > > >soy, the thai's also have a variant as do the Malays and so on.
        > > > >
        > > > >Garum or liquamen has many recipes according to who you read, it is
        > > > >alternately
        > > > >made from whole fish, fish livers or fish guts and blood depending on
        > >who's
        > > > >description you read. This is then layered alternately with lots of
        > >salt
        > > > >and
        > > > >herbs of various sorts again depending on who's recipe you use. The
        > > > >container
        > > > >is then sealed and left to macerate NOT ROT as is commonly thought, it
        > >is
        > > > >impossible for the contents to rot due to the large amount of salt
        > >present.
        > > > >What happens is that the fish liquefy over time as the coarse salt
        > >melts
        > > > >and a
        > > > >thick lumpy brine is formed. This is then strained either finely or
        > > > >coarsely
        > > > >depending on the use it is intended for.
        > > > >
        > > > >My reasoning is based on the following:
        > > > >
        > > > >I am Roman, I was born in the city am 34 years old and live there today
        > > > >though
        > > > >I have lived much of my life in the UK. I am a restaurateur and chef
        > >and
        > > > >have
        > > > >an extensive knowledge of Italian cuisine as well as being trained in
        > > > >classical
        > > > >french, modern British, Chinese, Japanese and Thai.
        > > > >
        > > > >Italian regional cuisine is very ancient in its origins, many dishes
        > >that
        > > > >are
        > > > >eaten today in Rome on the tables of the ordinary citizens and in the
        > >Roman
        > > > >campagna (not the restaurants which barring a few exceptions are
        > > > >bastardized
        > > > >and atypical) bear a great resemblance to those eaten by the ordinary
        > > > >citizens
        > > > >of Rome two millennia ago. Certainly new ingredients have been added
        > >(most
        > > > >notably the tomato and chilli pepper) as they have been discovered over
        > >the
        > > > >centuries but the basic style of the food remains the same. The crux
        > >of
        > > > >the
        > > > >matter is this; if garum was indeed as essential an ingredient in Roman
        > > > >cuisine
        > > > >as we are told by ancient texts then it is very likely that it would
        > >remain
        > > > >in
        > > > >the Roman diet in some prominent form today (much as soy sauce and Nuoc
        > >mam
        > > > >being very ancient still feature prominently in the far east). The
        > >fact
        > > > >that
        > > > >Italy has no Nuoc mam type sauce today nor has it had in living memory
        > > > >leads me
        > > > >to conclude that garum cannot have been a sauce like nuoc mam or it
        > >would
        > > > >remain in use today; not just in Italy but in Spain, Greece and North
        > > > >Africa,
        > > > >it is simply impossible for such an important ingredient to have
        > > > >disappeared
        > > > >from all of these countries without trace.
        > > > >
        > > > >What does remain in all of these countries is an enormous production of
        > > > >anchovies and other 'pesci azzurri' (sardines, mackerel etc.). These
        > >are
        > > > >produced in canned form via salting and then packing with olive oil and
        > > > >sometimes herbs and also as pureed form in tubes for simplified use in
        > > > >cooking. Anchovies are used extensively in mediterranean cuisine to
        > >impart
        > > > >salty 'sea' flavour to food, they are sometimes used in stews and
        > >soups,
        > > > >often
        > > > >used in saut�ed clams and other seafood, they are used in salad
        > >dressings
        > > > >and
        > > > >chopped in salads and on top of pizzas, wrapped around olives and
        > >capers,
        > > > >put
        > > > >on hard boiled eggs and so on and so on. As you can see they are very
        > > > >important today. It is my opinion that garum is the ancestor of the
        > >salted
        > > > >anchovy whether whole, filleted, pureed or in herbs; at some point
        > > > >production
        > > > >changed to a less liquefied product, possibly due to reduced production
        > > > >period,
        > > > >faster transport or maybe just a change in tastes.
        > > > >
        > > > >Anyway, that's my opinion for what its worth, accept it or not its up
        > >to
        > > > >you.
        > > > >But I will tell you one thing, try sprinkling nuoc mam on a endive
        > >salad
        > > > >and
        > > > >then making one using the recipe I suggest below. Bet you never use
        > >the
        > > > >nuoc
        > > > >mam again. (remember when using it as a dressing to add a olive oil and
        > > > >wine
        > > > >vinegar plus pepper to taste.)
        > > > >
        > > > >Below is a recipe from Gargilius Martialis 3rd C AD as published in the
        > > > >excellent book "A Cena da Lucullo" by Ilaria Gozzini Giacosa (published
        > >in
        > > > >English as "A Taste of Ancient Rome") plus a quick and clean variation
        > >that
        > > > >I
        > > > >have developed myself from a modern day Roman salad dressing.
        > > > >
        > > > >Garum (Gargilius Martialis 3C AD)
        > > > >Use fresh fatty fish e.g.. anchovies, sardines or mackerel.
        > > > >Dried aromatic herbs such as: dill, coriander, fennel, celery seed,
        > >mint,
        > > > >oregano and rosemary.
        > > > >Coarse sea salt
        > > > >
        > > > >Clean and wash the fish removing heads fins and guts if desired. (the
        > >guts
        > > > >impart a bitter flavour) Taking a large preserving or pickling jar (the
        > > > >wider
        > > > >the better) place a generous layer of herbs on the the bottom of the
        > >jar
        > > > >then
        > > > >place a layer of fish on the top (cutting the fish into sections if it
        > >is
        > > > >large) placing them fairly tightly packed.
        > > > >
        > > > >Over this add a layer of coarse sea salt (must be sea salt) about 3/4
        > >inch
        > > > >thick! Repeat these three layers till you have filled the jar to the
        > >top.
        > > > >
        > > > >Let the container rest in the sun for seven days (this is the
        > >traditional
        > > > >way).
        > > > >Then mix the sauce daily for a further twenty days. After that time it
        > > > >becomes
        > > > >a liquid and can be filtered if necessary.
        > > > >
        > > > >Here is a quickish clean garum of my own:
        > > > >
        > > > >6 tubes of anchovy paste, (or 12 small tins of anchovy fillets drained
        > >and
        > > > >liquidized)
        > > > >1/2 teaspoon of each of the above herbs but fresh if possible.
        > > > >1 clove of Garlic (crush it with the side of a knife)
        > > > >Pepper
        > > > >Good olive oil
        > > > >Wine vinegar
        > > > >
        > > > >Finely chop the herbs and place in a bowl. Add the anchovy paste, add
        > >the
        > > > >crushed garlic clove, ground black pepper (the quantity will dictate
        > >the
        > > > >'hotness' of the garum) a little vinegar and the olive oil, mix well
        > >(in a
        > > > >blender if necessary)
        > > > >
        > > > >The resulting sauce should pour easily, if not add more oil or white
        > >wine
        > > > >if
        > > > >you like. Store in the fridge for a day before use and always shake
        > >well
        > > > >before
        > > > >adding to recipes. Use sparingly as it is salty and often replaces
        > >salt in
        > > > >recipes. Makes an excellent dressing for lettuce and rocket salads,
        > >the
        > > > >traditional Roman hors d'oeuvre and is used in Rome today to dress
        > > > >"puntarelle"
        > > > >a salad leaf from the dandelion family that has been eaten in and
        > >around
        > > > >Rome
        > > > >for more than 2,000 years.
        > > > >
        > > > >Enjoy!
        > > > >
        > > > >P.S. If you should keel over with food poisoning after trying the
        > >ancient
        > > > >recipe I deny any responsibility! :)
        > > > >
        > > > >Marco Berni
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > >"Holliday, Rachel {DISC~Welwyn}" wrote:
        > > > >
        > > > > > From: "Holliday, Rachel {DISC~Welwyn}" <RACHEL.HOLLIDAY@...>
        > > > > >
        > > > > > Hello
        > > > > > I've just joined this list mailing because I enjoy food and have an
        > > > >interest
        > > > > > in the culinary techniques that have been used over time. I don't
        > >know
        > > > >if
        > > > > > I'll be able to contribute too much as my interest has been
        > > > > > medieval/renaissance up to now. But I am reading.
        > > > > >
        > > > > > First question:
        > > > > > I recently found a recipe requiring garum. I have no idea what this
        > >is
        > > > > > please could someone explain.
        > > > > > Thank you
        > > > > > Rachel
        > > > > >
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        > > > > >
        > > > > >
        > >------------------------------------------------------------------------
        > > > > > The best antique Roman recipes are at:
        > >http://www.home.ch/~spaw1087/orgy
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > >
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        > > > >The best antique Roman recipes are at:
        > >http://www.home.ch/~spaw1087/orgy
        > > >
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        >
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      • SheMichael@xxx.xxx
        There was an article which mentioned this in last month or so in Saveur , which is not with me. Sources would be at the end of the article or on their
        Message 3 of 3 , Jul 4, 1999
        • 0 Attachment
          There was an article which mentioned this in last month or so in "Saveur",
          which is not with me. Sources would be at the end of the article or on their
          "Sources" page.

          Sheila Shiki y Michaels

          In a message dated 99-07-01 08:42:29 EDT, you write:

          << Would you happen to know of a mail order source for bottarga? >>
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.