Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

blood garum

Expand Messages
  • sallygrain@aol.com
    Hi all Yes I am going to try to publish my idea but, as I now realise, i cannot do that without testing the theory against the use of the terms in the Greek
    Message 1 of 1 , Nov 15, 2005
      Hi all

      Yes I am going to try to publish my idea but, as I now realise, i cannot do
      that without testing the theory against the use of the terms in the Greek and
      Latin medical and veterinary text. Its going to be horrendous ploughing
      through it all given my poor language skills but necessary i think.

      The theory is that Greek garos is a fish sauce made with small or cleaned
      fish The latin equivelant is liquamen. Latin garum is a blood sauce made with
      fresh intestines from designated fish. The former is cheap and widely
      available, the latter is a luxury product and specifically a Roman development.
      The assumption that garum and liquamen are the same or similar in the late
      empire is based on evidence that can be refuted. The fact that garum and
      liquamen were once different products is very sound; its based on evidence from the
      manufacturers of fish sauces in Pompeii and is unrefutable.
      I think they always were diferent right through the classical period. A
      composite sauce made from blood, small fish and pieces of fish developed in the
      early medieval period - about the time of the Geoponica but a blood sauce
      and a fish sauce continued to be made.
      Dont ask me to explain any further as I will get distracted from the job in
      hand.


      sally







      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.