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Re: [Apicius] Re: Silphium extinct -- back to Parthian garum

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  • jdm314@aol.com
    ... An interesting point. I don t think I know enough about biology to judge how uncommon such a situation would be though. ... Fascinating! ... yeah, and I
    Message 1 of 11 , Nov 12, 2005
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      Scripsit Andreas Dalby:
      > how could that
      > be if the habitats are so widely separated? 'Populations' so far apart
      > that they can't interbreed would have differentiated eventually.

      An interesting point. I don't think I know enough about biology to
      judge how uncommon such a situation would be though.

      > Or
      > was one of the 'populations' introduced by humans after all? And could
      > that have anything to do with the fact that (according to Herodotus
      > 4.204) there was a settlement of Barcans (Barca was in the range of
      > silphium) in Bactria (in the range of asafoetida)? These people had
      > been more-or-less forcibly settled there by the ancient Persian
      > government.

      Fascinating!


      > Yes, and aoidos is used by some modern writers to mean a singer of
      > oral epic, while in real early Greek it meant a singer of any kind of
      > song.

      yeah, and I believe a lot of the technical names we give to the various
      clay vessels of the ancients rest on very little authority, as far as
      the matching of name to item goes. I don't object to this kind of
      thing, just so long as we keep it clear in our minds what is an
      authentic technical term, and what is a modern usage.

      The "gladius" example I gave is paralleled by swords from all around
      the world. "Katana" means any sabre in Japanese, "shamshir" means any
      sword in Farsi, and so on.

      > No offence taken -- assuming you in turn forgive me for mixing my
      > reply to your email with my posting to the group? ;)

      Oh, that's no offence at all. I didn't mind your reply being public, I
      just wanted to make sure other readers knew what we were talking about.

      -JDM
    • jdm314@aol.com
      ... This book looks really good! (There s a table of contents at http://www.acanthus-books.com/spicuppal.html ) Unfortunately, my university doesn t own a
      Message 2 of 11 , Nov 12, 2005
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        > A. Arndt, 'Silphium' in \Spicing up the palate: proceedings of the
        > Oxford Symposium on Food and Cookery 1992\ (Totnes: Prospect Books,
        > 1993) pp. 28-35.

        This book looks really good! (There's a table of contents at
        http://www.acanthus-books.com/spicuppal.html ) Unfortunately, my
        university doesn't own a copy, nor indeed a copy of ANY in this series
        except for 2002. There's too many good articles in that one volume to
        request xeroxes by inter library loan... so I may need to just request
        the whole book and do the xeroxing myself! ;)

        But this is just one volume, and there appear to be quite a large
        number.

        Not to mention Petits Propos Culinaires and other periodicals. Building
        up my library of food scholarship isn't goign to be easy ;)
      • lilinah@earthlink.net
        ... Part of the point of my rambling post was to make clear that Perry has since done a great deal more work on the topic of medieval Arabic fermented sauces,
        Message 3 of 11 , Nov 13, 2005
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          JDM wrote:
          > > I suppose you know that Charles Perry has written on medieval Arabic
          > > fermented sauces?
          >
          >Sounds interesting.

          Part of the point of my rambling post was to make clear that Perry
          has since done a great deal more work on the topic of medieval Arabic
          fermented sauces, and that he has changed his point of view on some
          of the issues in that earlier publication.

          Anahita
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