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Re: Nougat in Pliny??

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  • jdm314
    J.-Fred: thanks for pointing out the similarity of gastris to nougat. I posted a translation of that recipe to http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=
    Message 1 of 4 , Oct 27, 2005
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      J.-Fred: thanks for pointing out the similarity of gastris to nougat. I posted a
      translation of that recipe to http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=
      Talk:Nougat&action=submit#Nougat_in_Antiquity.3F , which might interest
      some people here. I haven't actually added a reference to gastris in the actual
      article, but I may eventually.

      Marianne: Your comment about the history of turron is very interesting.
      Perhaps you could add it (preferably with specific references) to http://
      en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turr%C3%B3n .

      -JDM

      --- In Apicius@yahoogroups.com, Jean-Frederic Lespect <fredlespect@y...>
      wrote:
      >
      > Hi,
      > I've never read nor heard about anything on nougat in Pliny, but I may be
      wrong...
      > However, I know that Atheneus (XIV, 647) gives a recipe called gastris that
      sounds a little like nougat. It is made of roasted nuts, wallnuts, almonds and
      poppy seeds, smashed and blended with pepper and hot honey. Mould that
      stuff in the shape of little cubes. Smash white sesamon, blend it with hot
      honey and do two slices between which you'll put the cubes.
      > I haven't tried yet.
      > J.-Fred
      >
      > jdm314@a... a écrit :
      > The wikipedia entry for "nougat", (at
      > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/nougat ) was recently ammended with the
      > following text:
      >
      > > The first appearance of nougat was described in the "Istoria
      > Naturalis" by Plinius the Old.
      > > As for him it was in Augusta Taurinorum, the current Turin.
      >
      > Now this is quite obviously not the work of a native speaker of
      > English, but aside from that can anyone tell me if this is true? The
      > Natural History is awfully large and I'm not 100% sure what I'm looking
      > for. A servh on "Taurinorum" turns up only one hit, which does not have
      > any obvious connection to confectionery:
      >
      > > oppida Vibi Forum, Segusio, coloniae ab Alpium radicibus Augusta
      > Taurinorum - inde
      > > navigabili Pado - antiqua Ligurum stirpe...
      >
      > If Pliny does indeed mention nougat or something like it, I really want
      > to know (I did, afterall, write http://la.wikipedia.org/wiki/nucatum
      > for the Latin wikipedia ;) ), but if he didn't I want to remove that
      > unsightly sentence (there seems to be no point in correcting the
      > grammar and spelling if I'll just delete it anyway).
      >
      > It seems to me that this is more likely a folk etymology for "torrón",
      > the Iberian equivalent of nougat.
      >
      > Can anyone help?
      >
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