Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [Apicius] Digest Number 769

Expand Messages
  • Weingarten
    ... evident that the Romans used such herbs as rue, borage, and thyme in their cooking. They also used cumin. However, I don t know if it was imported or not.
    Message 1 of 2 , Jul 22, 2004
    • 0 Attachment
      > I would imagine that a look at a few Apician recipes should make it
      evident that the Romans used such herbs as rue, borage, and thyme in their
      cooking. They also used cumin. However, I don't know if it was imported or
      not. I have also read that they ate fenugreek, but not the seeds as in
      Indian curry but rather the leaves. A few Indian restaurants also make lamb
      dishes with it. It looks like spinach but tastes like fenugreek. Fenugreek
      is said to be good for the lungs.


      It is clear from Galen that people ate fenugreek seeds boiled with garum.
      (Galen On Food and Diet ed and tr Mark Grant, Routledge London and New York
      2000) . there is lots more in Galen about other food stuffs, herbs etc.
      Yemenites Jews still use fenugreek seeds ground up and covered with boiling
      water. They then beat them with other ground spices and herbs (hot peppers
      spring onions garlic etc) and it makes a rather gelatinous stuff called
      hilbeh with a foaming top. This is eaten with bread or soup. The first
      century Jewish historian Josephus writing about the Jewish War against the
      Romans says that the Jews poured boiling fenugreek over the ramp the Romans
      were trying to climb to get at the besieged town of Jotapata in Galilee and
      the Romans sliupped around and couldn't get up, so presumably those Jews
      also boiled the seeds to form the slippery jelly!

      Susan Weingarten
      Tel Aviv
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.