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Re: [Apicius] Digest Number 594

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  • Marco Berni
    ... Grattacchecche... A traditional Roman roadside snack (granita) still served today along the Tiber roadside. Take 1 large block of ice (the sort you see in
    Message 1 of 5 , Jan 31, 2003
      > Check the older (blue cover) Larousse Gastronomique. I once read that
      > Romans
      > brought snow from the mountains to the city to mix with sweetened
      > fruit juice
      > as a dessert. I'll look for the reference, but it years ago that I saw
      > it in
      > print.

      Grattacchecche... A traditional Roman roadside snack (granita) still
      served today along the Tiber roadside.

      Take 1 large block of ice (the sort you see in films from the ice-box,
      pre-fridge era and one ice shaver (like a small carpenter's plane)
      shave off sufficient ice to fill a cup.

      Place in the cup and pour over your choice of fruit syrup. eat with
      spoon and special flared drinking straw.

      The roadside vendors these days use fruit syrups which come in a large
      variety of flavours, though obviously in ancient times sugar/glucose
      would not have been available to make these syrups and so they would
      mainly have been of the reduction type.

      My favourite is with tamarind syrup.

      Marco


      On Friday, January 31, 2003, at 04:14 AM, squashrot@... wrote:

      > In a message dated 1/30/2003 6:58:38 AM Eastern Standard Time,
      > Apicius@yahoogroups.com writes:
      >
      >
      >> Does anyone out there have any leads on information regarding Roman
      >> ices or
      >> iced confections/drinks? I'm working with a theme here, to serve an
      >> iced
      >> dish
      >> for a large festival and am looking for documentation that they
      >> existed and
      >>
      >> recipes to recreate them or even descriptions from the period
      >> (including
      >> the
      >> ancient, middle ages, and renaissance up to 17, 18th C)
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
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      > List owner: Apicius-owner@yahoogroups.com
      >
      >
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      > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
      >
      >
    • channonm@aol.com
      In a message dated 1/31/03 4:56:51 AM Eastern Standard Time, ... How wonderful, I have access to tamarind syrup here. It was one of the flavours I was
      Message 2 of 5 , Jan 31, 2003
        In a message dated 1/31/03 4:56:51 AM Eastern Standard Time,
        mberni@... writes:


        > Grattacchecche... A traditional Roman roadside snack (granita) still
        > served today along the Tiber roadside.
        >
        > Take 1 large block of ice (the sort you see in films from the ice-box,
        > pre-fridge era and one ice shaver (like a small carpenter's plane)
        > shave off sufficient ice to fill a cup.
        >
        > Place in the cup and pour over your choice of fruit syrup. eat with
        > spoon and special flared drinking straw.
        >
        > The roadside vendors these days use fruit syrups which come in a large
        > variety of flavours, though obviously in ancient times sugar/glucose
        > would not have been available to make these syrups and so they would
        > mainly have been of the reduction type.
        >
        > My favourite is with tamarind syrup.
        >
        > Marco
        >

        How wonderful, I have access to tamarind syrup here. It was one of the
        flavours I was considering along with real raspberry,orange blossom syrup,
        mint syrup and rose syrup. Not your typical "blue berry" ala glucose and food
        colouring :)

        I think this will be a true hit at this event, lets hope it's nice and hot
        that weekend :)

        With this we'll be serving a recipe from 15th C Italy (Vitulinum or "veal")
        tenderloin seasoned with coriander and salt cubed and skewered cooked over
        fire. MMMMM I'm hungry thinking of it. I just need to come up with one or two
        other menu items.

        If any of you are in Canada the 11, 12, 13 July look up the Windsor Festival
        Epicure. I will be there with bells on.

        Channon


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Marco Berni
        Yes it helps if it s hot so that the ice melts at the correct pace to keep up with the straw! The technique is to pour plenty of syrup over the top and stir
        Message 3 of 5 , Jan 31, 2003
          Yes it helps if it's hot so that the ice melts at the correct pace to
          keep up with the straw!

          The technique is to pour plenty of syrup over the top and stir with the
          straw. Then to eat with the spoon and suck the melting juice from the
          bottom alternately, remembering to stir regularly to avoid ending up
          with an overly watery 'drink' at the bottom after having overdone the
          drinking of the syrup at the start. The nice thing about making your
          own (versus the ones you buy from the stalls) is that you can always
          add more syrup whereas the vendors tend to take dim view of it.

          It's also very good with mint, melon, lemon and coconut syrups. Try
          different varieties until you settle on the one you like. One other
          way of making the ice is to put regular ice cubes in an clean kitchen
          towel and gather into a bag shape before hitting ten bells out of them
          with a meat hammer. Need to make it into pretty fine shards.

          Marco


          On Friday, January 31, 2003, at 06:41 PM, channonm@... wrote:

          > In a message dated 1/31/03 4:56:51 AM Eastern Standard Time,
          > mberni@... writes:
          >
          >
          >> Grattacchecche... A traditional Roman roadside snack (granita) still
          >> served today along the Tiber roadside.
          >>
          >> Take 1 large block of ice (the sort you see in films from the ice-box,
          >> pre-fridge era and one ice shaver (like a small carpenter's plane)
          >> shave off sufficient ice to fill a cup.
          >>
          >> Place in the cup and pour over your choice of fruit syrup. eat with
          >> spoon and special flared drinking straw.
          >>
          >> The roadside vendors these days use fruit syrups which come in a large
          >> variety of flavours, though obviously in ancient times sugar/glucose
          >> would not have been available to make these syrups and so they would
          >> mainly have been of the reduction type.
          >>
          >> My favourite is with tamarind syrup.
          >>
          >> Marco
          >>
          >
          > How wonderful, I have access to tamarind syrup here. It was one of the
          > flavours I was considering along with real raspberry,orange blossom
          > syrup,
          > mint syrup and rose syrup. Not your typical "blue berry" ala glucose
          > and food
          > colouring :)
          >
          > I think this will be a true hit at this event, lets hope it's nice and
          > hot
          > that weekend :)
          >
          > With this we'll be serving a recipe from 15th C Italy (Vitulinum or
          > "veal")
          > tenderloin seasoned with coriander and salt cubed and skewered cooked
          > over
          > fire. MMMMM I'm hungry thinking of it. I just need to come up with one
          > or two
          > other menu items.
          >
          > If any of you are in Canada the 11, 12, 13 July look up the Windsor
          > Festival
          > Epicure. I will be there with bells on.
          >
          > Channon
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          > Post message: Apicius@yahoogroups.com
          > Unsubscribe: Apicius-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
          > List owner: Apicius-owner@yahoogroups.com
          >
          >
          > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
          > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
          >
          >
        • channonm@aol.com
          In a message dated 1/31/03 1:51:56 PM Eastern Standard Time, ... Sounds like you have the technique perfected :) I will be sure to advise my customers of your
          Message 4 of 5 , Jan 31, 2003
            In a message dated 1/31/03 1:51:56 PM Eastern Standard Time,
            mberni@... writes:


            > The technique is to ....................
            >
            >
            Sounds like you have the technique perfected :)

            I will be sure to advise my customers of your method.

            Channon



            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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