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Sweets please!

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  • kekko1970
    Hi all!!! I) I thought to start the new year offering an interesting recipe to my friends, it s called Patina of Pears - anybody managed to cook it? It s
    Message 1 of 2 , Jan 2, 2002
      Hi all!!!

      I) I thought to start the new year offering an interesting recipe to
      my friends, it's called "Patina of Pears"- anybody managed to cook it?
      It's basically made cooking pears with wine & passum, then spiced
      with cumin, mixed with eggs and cooked in the oven. The smell is very
      inviting but it's really missing "consistence".....what about mixing
      the eggs with flour??? it could be a delicious sweet "crèpe"....no
      surprise I found many many recipes about pear cakes made in a very
      similar fashion: the pear is cooked in wine or in special wines like
      Vin Santo, Marsala, then it's used as filling for sweet cakes.
      The only great difference is really the flour. I wonder If this
      recipe is the ancestor of modern "crèpes".

      II) I read an interesting thing: in ancient Rome they used to eat a
      sweet that possibly survived 'til our times (at least in the South of
      Italy). I only know it was made with blood of Pork and its name
      should be "botolus"...has anybody the recipe of it? in the South of
      Italy a very popular sweet is eaten at Carnival, it's
      called "Sanguinaccio" and it's made with blood of Pork mixed with
      cacao and candies (plus many other secondary ingredients which I
      don't remember). Unfortunately this sweet has been declared "illegal"
      for obvious sanitary reasons, yet our fathers still remember it as an
      unbeatable delicacy. I wonder if it's derived from the old
      botolus....with the adding of cacao of course.

      Thanks & Happy new year to everyone!
      bye
      Francesco
    • Martijn Bink
      ... I have made the patina of pear, and it seems that the Romans expected a not too firm pudding or custard. The mixture shouldn t fully set. I have had the
      Message 2 of 2 , Jan 2, 2002
        At 14:26 2-1-02 , you wrote:
        >Hi all!!!
        >
        >I) I thought to start the new year offering an interesting recipe to
        >my friends, it's called "Patina of Pears"- anybody managed to cook it?
        >It's basically made cooking pears with wine & passum, then spiced
        >with cumin, mixed with eggs and cooked in the oven. The smell is very
        >inviting but it's really missing "consistence".....what about mixing
        >the eggs with flour??? it could be a delicious sweet "crèpe"....no
        >surprise I found many many recipes about pear cakes made in a very
        >similar fashion: the pear is cooked in wine or in special wines like
        >Vin Santo, Marsala, then it's used as filling for sweet cakes.
        >The only great difference is really the flour. I wonder If this
        >recipe is the ancestor of modern "crèpes".
        >
        I have made the patina of pear, and it seems that the Romans expected a not
        too firm pudding or custard. The mixture shouldn't fully set. I have had
        the same in a 'Roman' restaurant in Trier, where they had changed the
        recipe into a custard or pudding which had set with a pear in the middle,
        thus giving the course a bit more texture. When I made the original recipe
        the outcome did raise some eyebrows among my guests, but it tasted great.
        (this recipe has been interpreted in 'The Classical Cookbook' by Sally
        Grainger and Andrew Dalby and by Marcus Junkelmann in Panis Militaris (in
        geman).

        Good luck with your cooking,

        Martijn Bink
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