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Re: [Apicius] corn quest

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  • Weingarten
    In English English, as opposed to US English, corn still means grain and is not necessarily at all high-sounding. Maize is called sweet corn or
    Message 1 of 7 , Feb 6, 2001
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      In English English, as opposed to US English, corn still means grain and is
      not necessarily at all 'high-sounding.' Maize is called sweet corn or
      corn-on-the-cob.
      But if you want to be high-sounding, there is always Keats' 'Ode to a
      nightingale'

      ... the sad heart of Ruth, when sick for home,
      She stood in tears amid the alien corn.

      Susan Weingarten

      At 21:28 06/02/01 -0500, you wrote:
      >I'm a recent initiate so bear with me. I have been doing some research
      >and I'm a bit confused about the existence of corn in ancient Rome.
      >Most sources indicate that corn was brought to italy much later, from
      >the Americas, but Caesar mentions using corn in Gaul to feed the
      >troops. Did Caesar mean something else, or was it translated
      >erroneously? Any thoughts would be welcome.
      >
      >
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      >
      Micky Weingarten,
      Professor, Department of Family Medicine,
      Rabin Medical Centre - Beilinson Campus,
      Tel-Aviv University
      Petah Tikva 49100, ISRAEL
      AND
      Sue Weingarten,
      Department of Classical Archaeology,
      Tel-Aviv University.
      (Home: 31, Hibner Street,
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