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4054Re: [Apicius] Re: Roman Forks

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  • Correus
    Feb 15, 2007
      Ave Caius Fabius,

      I believe you are spot on in regard to the "novelty" aspect. Your other statement, "I
      suspect that the forks I have photographed in various museums were either for off table use in the kitchen or for special use, such as eating snails", is probably more accurate.

      Did you see my other post about olives? When I saw the pic of that fork one of the first things that cam to mind was olives. I have a devil of a time spearing an olive with skewer, but have no problem with a fork.

      That would go hand-in-hand with what your statement hit on - kitchen or special use.

      BTW - what I meant by 'more forks' is just that I've been noticing them more often in displays and pic. Perhaps it's just that I keep looking for them. <G>

      Correus

      caiusfabius <SPQR_HQ@...> wrote:
      --- In Apicius@yahoogroups.com, Correus <correus@...> wrote:
      >
      > SALVETE OMNES!
      >
      > Well, just to get a topic started.....
      >
      > Some very good friends of mine purchased a reproduction Roman
      spoon for me. it is just over 12 CM in length.
      >
      > While doing some research on Roman spoons today (it seemed awful
      small even though it was made from the cast of an original found in
      the UK) I ran across an interesting site.
      >
      > http://www.historyforkids.org/learn/romans/food/dishes.htm
      >
      > Take a look at the second picture (I have also added it to an
      album titled "Forks").
      >
      > What do you all think? Yes - I know it has been discussed in the
      past, but it seems like more forks are popping up in museums!
      >
      > VALETE
      > CORREVS·APPIVS·IVLIANVS·APICIVS
      >
      > The truth may be boring, and even unpleasant: But it is always
      better than half truths and out right lies ~ Tw Moran

      I am not sure what is meant by 'more forks'. Sure you find about 1
      'Roman' fork for every 300+ 'Roman'spoons in museums and collections
      and such, (I have been qouted higher numbers of spoons, this was the
      lowest ratio I have been quoted) but is that significant? We saw the
      'Roman fork' in the Gallo-Roman Museum at St Germain, France, but did
      it represent many forks or is it a novelty, which is more interesting
      for a museum to display?
      The folks on the Roman Army Tour talked about it for several hours,
      and tried to understand the significance, then we went to dinner, and
      had snails... and the same type of fork... to eat the snails. I
      suspect that the forks I have photographed in various museums were
      either for off table use in the kitchen or for special use, such as
      eating snails.

      Caius






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