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Re: [Antir_culinary] So, I'm watching the Supersizers. . .

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  • Johnna Holloway
    Someone suggested they used Robert May for the recipes but I didn t find an exact match there. I have to wonder if it s a pastiche made up from suggested
    Message 1 of 8 , Aug 2 4:02 PM
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      Someone suggested they used Robert May for the recipes but I didn't find an exact match there.

      I have to wonder if it's a pastiche made up from suggested original recipes.

      Here's one possible

      How to make a good white broth.

      TAke two marrow bones and a Cock, and boyle them together in faire water and white wine. Then take Parsley, Tyme, Spinnage & Lettice, and bind them in a bundell, and put it in the pot with the water and wine, the Cock & marrow bones. Then take Prunes and currans, & binde them in a cloth, and put them in the potte, and a quantitie of whole mace, and binde them in like manner by themselues, and put into the pot a peece of Butter, and a good quantitie of Sugar. When the Cocke and the mary bones be sodden and readie to be serued: Then take from them the broth, and straine it verie cleane, and put it into another pot. Then take the said mace, Prunes and currans foorth of the clothes & put them into the pot: then take three yolkes of Egs, and Rosewater, and put them into the broth, and boyle it a little while, fayre and softlie with a litle salt, and so serue it.  

























        

      The good Huswifes Handmaide for the Kitchin

      1594

      recap here

      Johnnae

      On Aug 2, 2013, at 5:07 PM, Karen Kidd wrote:

       

      Greetings!

      I've been watching the Supersizers on YouTube. It's a British series in which two folks are put thru a week or eating foods from various periods of British history. It's more for fun than anything but their cooks do make some effort to cook period dishes.  There was a chicken dish that they described as "Elizabethan". Chicken stuffed with prunes and currants and then stewed in rosewater. It sounds delightful. However, my own effort to find the period recipe has been fruitless. When I ask Sir Google, he provides me with many recipes - all variations on each other - that claim it is Elizabethan but no documentation. I'm beginning to think it might just be an urban myth but . . . anyone here know?

      YIS,
      --Karin Georgsdottir
    • Karen Kidd
      Hmmmmm. That does sound fairly close. I suppose the recipe could have been adjusted to give a whole chicken rather than just broth. Cool! About the mace . . .
      Message 2 of 8 , Aug 2 7:22 PM
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        Hmmmmm. That does sound fairly close. I suppose the recipe could have been adjusted to give a whole chicken rather than just broth. Cool!

        About the mace . . . I wonder what "a quantity" amounts to.


        From: Johnna Holloway <johnnae@...>
        To: Antir_culinary@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Friday, August 2, 2013 4:02 PM
        Subject: Re: [Antir_culinary] So, I'm watching the Supersizers. . .

         
        Someone suggested they used Robert May for the recipes but I didn't find an exact match there.

        I have to wonder if it's a pastiche made up from suggested original recipes.

        Here's one possible

        How to make a good white broth.

        TAke two marrow bones and a Cock, and boyle them together in faire water and white wine. Then take Parsley, Tyme, Spinnage & Lettice, and bind them in a bundell, and put it in the pot with the water and wine, the Cock & marrow bones. Then take Prunes and currans, & binde them in a cloth, and put them in the potte, and a quantitie of whole mace, and binde them in like manner by themselues, and put into the pot a peece of Butter, and a good quantitie of Sugar. When the Cocke and the mary bones be sodden and readie to be serued: Then take from them the broth, and straine it verie cleane, and put it into another pot. Then take the said mace, Prunes and currans foorth of the clothes & put them into the pot: then take three yolkes of Egs, and Rosewater, and put them into the broth, and boyle it a little while, fayre and softlie with a litle salt, and so serue it.  

























          

        The good Huswifes Handmaide for the Kitchin

        1594
        http://www.uni-giessen.de/gloning/ghhk/

        recap here
        http://glvalentine.livejournal.com/374489.html

        Johnnae

        On Aug 2, 2013, at 5:07 PM, Karen Kidd wrote:

         

        Greetings!

        I've been watching the Supersizers on YouTube. It's a British series in which two folks are put thru a week or eating foods from various periods of British history. It's more for fun than anything but their cooks do make some effort to cook period dishes.  There was a chicken dish that they described as "Elizabethan". Chicken stuffed with prunes and currants and then stewed in rosewater. It sounds delightful. However, my own effort to find the period recipe has been fruitless. When I ask Sir Google, he provides me with many recipes - all variations on each other - that claim it is Elizabethan but no documentation. I'm beginning to think it might just be an urban myth but . . . anyone here know?

        YIS,
        --Karin Georgsdottir


      • Johnna Holloway
        The search function at http://medievalcookery.com/search/search.html searches these volumes in case you want to try a search on the ingredients A Book of
        Message 3 of 8 , Aug 2 8:25 PM
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          The search function at http://medievalcookery.com/search/search.html 
          searches these volumes in case you want to try a search on the ingredients

          A Book of Cookrye
          (England, 1591)
          Delights for Ladies
          (England, 1609)
          A Proper newe Booke of Cokerye
          (England, mid-16th c.) The 1545 volume was also printed in 1575 and 1576.
          The Treasurie of commodious Conceits
          (England, 1573 - J. Holloway, transcr.)

          The 1594 Good Huswifes Handmaide for the Kitchin as noted below can be searched directly through the website.

          My annotated version of The Good Housewife's Treasurie from 1588 will be out this fall.

          The Mace ahh the joys of early cookery. Start with a small amount and increase to taste.

          My article  "Recreating The Elizabethan Era Feast" appears in Tournaments Illuminated 4th Quarter 2012 #184, pp. 21-24. It lists numerous sources to help one get started in exploring the cookery and foods of the era.

          Johnnae
              
          On Aug 2, 2013, at 10:22 PM, Karen Kidd wrote:

           

          Hmmmmm. That does sound fairly close. I suppose the recipe could have been adjusted to give a whole chicken rather than just broth. Cool!

          About the mace . . . I wonder what "a quantity" amounts to.


          From: Johnna Holloway <johnnae@...>
          To: Antir_culinary@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Friday, August 2, 2013 4:02 PM
          Subject: Re: [Antir_culinary] So, I'm watching the Supersizers. . .

           
          Someone suggested they used Robert May for the recipes but I didn't find an exact match there.

          I have to wonder if it's a pastiche made up from suggested original recipes.

          Here's one possible How to make a good white broth snipped

          The good Huswifes Handmaide for the Kitchin

          1594

          recap here

          Johnnae

          On Aug 2, 2013, at 5:07 PM, Karen Kidd wrote:

           
          snipped There was a chicken dish that they described as "Elizabethan". Chicken stuffed with prunes and currants and then stewed in rosewater. It sounds delightful. However, my own effort to find the period recipe has been fruitless. When I ask Sir Google, he provides me with many recipes - all variations on each other - that claim it is Elizabethan but no documentation. I'm beginning to think it might just be an urban myth but . . . anyone here know?

          YIS,
          --Karin Georgsdottir



        • Karen Kidd
          Oh, I m lovin the search feature :-) Thank you. ________________________________ From: Johnna Holloway To: Antir_culinary@yahoogroups.com
          Message 4 of 8 , Aug 2 10:26 PM
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            Oh, I'm lovin' the search feature :-)

            Thank you.


            From: Johnna Holloway <johnnae@...>
            To: Antir_culinary@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Friday, August 2, 2013 8:25 PM
            Subject: Re: [Antir_culinary] So, I'm watching the Supersizers. . .

             
            The search function at http://medievalcookery.com/search/search.html 
            searches these volumes in case you want to try a search on the ingredients

            A Book of Cookrye
            (England, 1591)
            Delights for Ladies
            (England, 1609)
            A Proper newe Booke of Cokerye
            (England, mid-16th c.) The 1545 volume was also printed in 1575 and 1576.
            The Treasurie of commodious Conceits
            (England, 1573 - J. Holloway, transcr.)

            The 1594 Good Huswifes Handmaide for the Kitchin as noted below can be searched directly through the website.

            My annotated version of The Good Housewife's Treasurie from 1588 will be out this fall.

            The Mace ahh the joys of early cookery. Start with a small amount and increase to taste.

            My article  "Recreating The Elizabethan Era Feast" appears in Tournaments Illuminated 4th Quarter 2012 #184, pp. 21-24. It lists numerous sources to help one get started in exploring the cookery and foods of the era.

            Johnnae
                
            On Aug 2, 2013, at 10:22 PM, Karen Kidd wrote:

             

            Hmmmmm. That does sound fairly close. I suppose the recipe could have been adjusted to give a whole chicken rather than just broth. Cool!

            About the mace . . . I wonder what "a quantity" amounts to.


            From: Johnna Holloway <johnnae@...>
            To: Antir_culinary@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Friday, August 2, 2013 4:02 PM
            Subject: Re: [Antir_culinary] So, I'm watching the Supersizers. . .

             
            Someone suggested they used Robert May for the recipes but I didn't find an exact match there.

            I have to wonder if it's a pastiche made up from suggested original recipes.

            Here's one possible How to make a good white broth snipped

            The good Huswifes Handmaide for the Kitchin

            1594
            http://www.uni-giessen.de/gloning/ghhk/

            recap here
            http://glvalentine.livejournal.com/374489.html

            Johnnae

            On Aug 2, 2013, at 5:07 PM, Karen Kidd wrote:

             
            snipped There was a chicken dish that they described as "Elizabethan". Chicken stuffed with prunes and currants and then stewed in rosewater. It sounds delightful. However, my own effort to find the period recipe has been fruitless. When I ask Sir Google, he provides me with many recipes - all variations on each other - that claim it is Elizabethan but no documentation. I'm beginning to think it might just be an urban myth but . . . anyone here know?

            YIS,
            --Karin Georgsdottir





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