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Fwd: [Sca-cooks] Possible Cheese Classes in An Tir (NW WA state) [rgiles@centurytel.net]

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  • Rikke D. Giles
    Greetings all, Last weekend I was honored to spend a whole day talking about cheese! This was at Sergeantry Trials for my Barony, where I was trying for
    Message 1 of 2 , Jun 18, 2013
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    • adeliza@rocketmail.com
      Congradulations and oh yes I would come to a class like that - I am not a begining cheese maker - so basics I have - years of knowledge and the little tips and
      Message 2 of 2 , Jun 18, 2013
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        Congradulations and oh yes I would come to a class like that - I am not a begining cheese maker - so basics I have - years of knowledge and the little tips and tricks is what I need


        --- In Antir_culinary@yahoogroups.com, "Rikke D. Giles" <rgiles@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Greetings all,
        >
        > Last weekend I was honored to spend a whole day talking about cheese!
        > This was at Sergeantry Trials for my Barony, where I was trying for
        > Courtier of Arts and Sciences (our equivalent of a Sergeant). I passed
        > and am now on my quest!
        >
        > As luck would have it, I was able to present about 10 varieties of
        > homemade cheese: Parmesan, Tomme, Romano, Asiago, Manchego, Cheddar,
        > Gruyere, Chevre, Ricotta, 'Scalded-curds' (from Kenelm Digby's book) at
        > two ages, and I think that's it. All the cheeses but the Chevre and
        > Ricotta were at least 6 months old. Some were a year old. It just
        > happened that many of the cheeses I'd made in the Fall/Winter came ripe
        > right at the same time.
        >
        > Those who tasted the cheese told me I'd acheived my main goal - to
        > make cheeses in the same place, same kitchen, ripen them in the same
        > 'cave', and still have them taste different, with different rinds,
        > textures and even colors (all from the same milk with no additives
        > other than cultures, salt and rennet). Of course each cheese had a
        > signature 'FoxDog Farm' flavor background, and that's because the milk
        > is the milk is the milk. Can't get away from that.
        >
        > Anyway, after 10 years of learning, making and studying, I finally
        > feel like I'm 'there' with cheese-making. Therefore, I am going to set
        > up a weekend of cheesemaking at my farm, hopefully for some time this
        > fall. I'm trying to gauge interest at this point. The farm is more
        > than big enough to set up tents if necessary, although the cheesemaking
        > will be in the farm kitchen or, if we have the outdoor kitchen done,
        > there. The classes will cover how to make cheeses 'different' in a
        > home setting and how to go about aging them when one doesn't have a
        > cave or anything fancy to do so. We'll probably cover making one
        > particular kind of cheese, but branch off in to talking about various
        > others as well. This is not really a beginner class, and it's not one,
        > unfortunately, than can be taught at a camping event (unless the
        > camping is on or near the farm!).
        >
        > Let me know if you are interested!
        >
        > Aelianora de Wyntringham
        > Barony of Dragon's Laire, An Tir
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