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Recipe of the Week, April 11th, 2013

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  • The Henson's
    Salads continued... Some Etymology :-While the word Salad was in use (In English) by 1400, sallet, salat and other variations remained in use throughout period
    Message 1 of 3 , Apr 11, 2013
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      Salads continued...

      Some Etymology :-While the word Salad was in use (In English) by 1400,
      sallet, salat and other variations remained in use throughout period and
      into the eighteenth century. Salad Oil turns up by 1540. Salad Days
      turns up by 1606 when Shakespeare puts the words in Cleopatra’s mouth.
      Salad Dressing by 1840 and Salad Fork by 1920, but Salad Bar not until
      the 1970’s.

      Gervase Markham lays out instructions for several types of sallats in
      his handbook for housewives published in 1616. Included are simple
      sallets, generally a single ingredient dressed with “without anything
      but a little vinegar, sallat oil, and sugar” or for cooked onions,
      samphire, bean cods, asparagus and cucumbers, served “likewise with oil,
      vinegar and pepper”. From there he moves on to Compound sallets, of
      mixed herbs or for a for a grand occasion combined such items as
      almonds, raisons, figs, capers, olives, currants red sage and spinach
      dressed with oil, vinegar and sugar layered with thin sliced lemons and
      oranges and more layers of greens. He includes a boiled sallat, pickling
      sallats, preserving sallats, strange sallats and sallats for show only.

      Markham’s Of compound sallats
      Your compound sallats are first young buds and knots of all manner of
      wholesome herbs at their first springing; as red sage, mints, lettuce,
      violets, marigold, spinach, and many other mixed together, and then
      served up to the table with vinegar, sallat oil and sugar.

      A few years later Sir Kenelm Digby takes note of a chicken salad

      Sallet of Cold Capon Roasted
      It is a good Sallet, to slice a cold Capon then; mingle with it some
      Sibbolds, Lettice, Rocket and Tarragon sliced small. Season all with
      Pepper, Salt, Vinegar and Oyl, and sliced Limon. A little Origanum doth
      well with it.

      From the Closet of Sir Kenelm Digby Opened. Original date 1669, edited
      by Jane Stevenson and Peter Davidson out of Prospect Book 1997

      More salads to come….
      Good Cooking
      Rycheza
    • FV/Rafaella
      Greetings all, When I first started doing historical cooking in the late 80s, I made a cucumber dish for my college group s feast that was thin sliced
      Message 2 of 3 , Apr 13, 2013
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        Greetings all,

        When I first started doing historical cooking in the late 80s, I made a cucumber dish for my college group's feast that was thin sliced cucumbers soaked overnight in red wine vinegar, drained, and then made into a salad with spices and sour cream. The pink color was important, I may be misremembering the sour cream.

        It could just be that my memory of this recipe's historicalness is pure imagination, but I'm just sure I got it from a book in our college library. "Period cookbooks" at the time that I knew about consisted of Fabulous Feasts and To the King's Taste. (I still have both my copies from this timeperiod).

        Anywho, I thought I'd ping the experts here and see if something like this sounds familiar to someone.

        Thanks in advance,
        Rafaella d'Allemtejo
      • Johnna Holloway
        There s one in the Florilegium that uses yogurt. http://www.florilegium.org/?http%3A//www.florilegium.org/files/FOOD-VEGETABLES/idxfood-veg.html Johnnae
        Message 3 of 3 , Apr 13, 2013
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          There's one in the Florilegium that uses yogurt.


          Johnnae

          On Apr 13, 2013, at 7:55 AM, FV/Rafaella wrote:

           

          Greetings all,

          When I first started doing historical cooking in the late 80s, I made a cucumber dish for my college group's feast that was thin sliced cucumbers soaked overnight in red wine vinegar, drained, and then made into a salad with spices and sour cream. The pink color was important, I may be misremembering the sour cream.

          It could just be that my memory of this recipe's historicalness is pure imagination, but I'm just sure I got it from a book in our college library. "Period cookbooks" at the time that I knew about consisted of Fabulous Feasts and To the King's Taste. (I still have both my copies from this timeperiod).

          Anywho, I thought I'd ping the experts here and see if something like this sounds familiar to someone.

          Thanks in advance,
          Rafaella d'Allemtejo


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