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Re: [Antir_culinary] Recipe of the Week July 26th, 2012

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  • Zachary Smith
    I d love to try medlar before commiting to grow one. I tried Titan almond a few years back. Just when it was old/big enough to strat bearing fruit it was
    Message 1 of 10 , Aug 1, 2012
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      I'd love to try medlar before commiting to grow one.
      I tried "Titan" almond a few years back. Just when it was old/big enough to strat bearing fruit it was killed by repeated freezing-thawing cycles.
       
      What sorts of quinces and currants do you have?
       
      Edmund
      From: Sheri L. Rees <s.l.rees@...>
      To: Antir_culinary@yahoogroups.com
      Cc: Antir_culinary@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Tuesday, July 31, 2012 1:57 PM
      Subject: Re: [Antir_culinary] Recipe of the Week July 26th, 2012

       
      My garden is fallow in many spaces, I ran out of time to get everything started & replanted this year.
      However, I do have quinces & medlars, currants, blueberries, figs, oranges, lemons, italian plums.
      The green gage, pomegranate, & olive trees have no fruit this year -they're all too young.

      The jujubes were a disaster when I tried them - we just don't have a long enough summer heat season.
      I may try them again potted in the greenhouse.

      This year was also a trial for amaranth.
      Waiting patiently for them to seed.

      The herb variety is growing well from last year's reseeding and new seedlings.
      Basil, oregano, fennel, borage, sorrel, sage, tarragon, chives.

      Shadhra

      --- griffonvert@... wrote:


      From: Zachary Smith <griffonvert@...>
      To: "Antir_culinary@yahoogroups.com" <Antir_culinary@yahoogroups.com>
      Subject: Re: [Antir_culinary] Recipe of the Week July 26th, 2012
      Date: Tue, 31 Jul 2012 13:27:02 -0700 (PDT)



      Sadly, I didn't get any vegetables in this year. I'm calling the garden fallow; it sounds better. I'm working on locating some arguably medieval skirrets, non-orange carrots, and other such to plant next year.
       
      My Green Gage (aka Reine Claude) plum goes back some centuries. My oldest apples are Cox's Orange Pippin and King of Tompkins County (aka Tompkin's King) from the early 19th & mid 18th centuries.

      Edmund Graham
      From: "fiammetta@..." <fiammetta@...>
      To: Antir_culinary@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Monday, July 30, 2012 8:29 PM
      Subject: Re: [Antir_culinary] Recipe of the Week July 26th, 2012

       
      I am! I have a quince tree that may have some fruit this year, and I am growing jerusalem artichokes, salsify root, borage and fava beans.
       
      Ciao,
      Fiamma
      ================================================================
       
      In a message dated 7/30/2012 3:07:31 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time, julillasempronia@... writes:
       
      Very much, tho' we're not in a position to grow anything.

      ~Julilla

      On Jul 30, 2012, at 10:03 AM, Zachary Smith wrote:

       

      In a way it's comforting to know that wheat plums are little known elsewhere; it's a case of common ignorance.
       
      On a related note: how many of you folks are interested in old-time (not necessarily medieval) plants, fruit, & vegetables?
       
      Edmund Graham

      > coupl e pies.
      > OK, here's a question - what are wheat plums? i'm familiar w/ Damsons
      > and Morellos, but this is new one for me.
      > Edmund Graham
      >











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