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Recipe of the Week May 3rd 2012

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  • The Henson's
    April Showers bring May Flowers, so here we are. Technically a lot of things we eat are flowers or parts of flowers; saffron, cloves, capers, broccoli,
    Message 1 of 5 , May 3, 2012
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      April Showers bring May Flowers, so here we are. Technically a lot of
      things we eat are flowers or parts of flowers; saffron, cloves, capers,
      broccoli, cauliflower. But what we will be talking about here are items
      the average preschooler would consider to be a flower.
      Now I don’t know about you, but growing up, as I did, in the
      mid-west in a middle class home, the thought of eating flowers was
      something quite exotic, despite the fact my Aunt Mary grew a few
      nasturtiums beside her kitchen door for just that purpose.
      While I didn’t happen upon any recipes calling for nasturtiums they were
      mentioned in the Tacuinum Sanitatis

      Garden nasturtiums (Rucola Masturcium) Nature: Warm and humid in the
      first degree. Optimum: the kind that are less strong in flavor,
      Usefulness: They increase coitus and sperm. Dangers: They cause
      headaches. Neutralization of dangers: With endive salad, lettuce and
      vinegar.

      And the familiar salat from the Forme of Curye calls for borage. Either
      the leaves, (when young) or the lovely blue flowers could have been
      used. BTW Borage grows very well in the Northwest and if anyone would
      like a start I’d be glad to oblige! Bees love it and a single plant
      could keep you in flowers all summer.

      Take persel, sauge, garlek, chy-
      bollus, oynouns, leke, borage,
      myntes, poorettes, fenell, and
      towne tressis, rewe, rosmarye,
      purslary, lave & waische hem
      clene, pyke hem pluk hem small
      with thyne honde & myng hem
      wel with rawe oyle, lay on
      vyneger & salt & serve hem forth.

      Diuersa Cibaria published in Cury on Inglysche edited by Constance
      Hieatt and Sharon Butler contributes this recipe calling for hawthorne
      blossoms

      35 Anothur mete that hatte espyne. Nym the floures of theouethorn
      (Hawthorn) clanlichee igedered, & mak grinden in an mortoer al to
      poudre, & sothen tempre with milke of alemauns other of cow; & sothen do
      therto bred othur amydon vor to lyen, & od ayren; & lye wel wyth speces
      & of leues of the thorne, & stey thron floures, & sothen descree


      Corn flowers make a pudding blue in the Cookbook of Sabina Welserin.
      To make a blue pudding
      Bruise cornflowers and press them with water through a cloth. If you
      want, blanch almonds in it, whose milk is then blue. Afterwards make a
      pudding with it.

      Next week we’ll look at another popular blue flower, violets.
      (Remember to be careful using flowers for culinary purposes, using
      either flowers grown commercially for that purpose or home grown flowers
      raised without pesticides or other chemicals, especially sprayed on the
      flowers themselves but also those that might have been carried into the
      plant from the roots or leaves.)

      Good Cooking
      Rycheza
    • Zachary Smith
      Thanks for the interesting piece. I enjoy eating many flowers (Arugula is probably my favorite. They have some of the radish/nasturtium pepperiness, a little
      Message 2 of 5 , May 7, 2012
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        Thanks for the interesting piece. I enjoy eating many flowers (Arugula is probably my favorite. They have some of the radish/nasturtium pepperiness, a little sweet and a peanut-like aftertaste.) but had not considered their use in medieval cooking.
        A cautionary note: I have not tried eating the flowers from my hawthorns, nor am I likely to do so. They have a sort of charnel smell.
         
        Edmund Graham

        From: The Henson's <mhenson@...>
        To: DLCulinaryGuild@yahoogroups.com; Antir_culinary@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Thursday, May 3, 2012 11:24 AM
        Subject: [Antir_culinary] Recipe of the Week May 3rd 2012

        April Showers bring May Flowers, so here we are. Technically a lot of
        things we eat are flowers or parts of flowers; saffron, cloves, capers,
        broccoli, cauliflower. But what we will be talking about here are items
        the average preschooler would consider to be a flower.
              Now I don’t know about you, but growing up, as I did, in the
        mid-west in a middle class home, the thought of eating flowers was
        something quite exotic, despite the fact my Aunt Mary grew a few
        nasturtiums beside her kitchen door for just that purpose.
        While I didn’t happen upon any recipes calling for nasturtiums they were
        mentioned in the Tacuinum Sanitatis

        Garden nasturtiums (Rucola Masturcium) Nature: Warm and humid in the
        first degree. Optimum: the kind that are less strong in flavor,
        Usefulness: They increase coitus and sperm. Dangers: They cause
        headaches. Neutralization of dangers: With endive salad, lettuce and
        vinegar.

        And the familiar salat from the Forme of Curye calls for borage. Either
        the leaves, (when young) or the lovely blue flowers could have been
        used. BTW Borage grows very well in the Northwest and if anyone would
        like a start I’d be glad to oblige! Bees love it and a single plant
        could keep you in flowers all summer.

        Take persel, sauge, garlek, chy-
        bollus, oynouns, leke, borage,
        myntes, poorettes, fenell, and
        towne tressis, rewe, rosmarye,
        purslary, lave & waische hem
        clene, pyke hem pluk hem small
        with thyne honde & myng hem
        wel with rawe oyle, lay on
        vyneger & salt & serve hem forth.

        Diuersa Cibaria published in Cury on Inglysche edited by Constance
        Hieatt and Sharon Butler contributes this recipe calling for hawthorne
        blossoms

        35 Anothur mete that hatte espyne. Nym the floures of theouethorn
        (Hawthorn) clanlichee igedered, & mak grinden in an mortoer al to
        poudre, & sothen tempre with milke of alemauns other of cow; & sothen do
        therto bred othur amydon vor to lyen, & od ayren; & lye wel wyth speces
        & of leues of the thorne, & stey thron floures, & sothen descree


          Corn flowers make a pudding blue in the Cookbook of Sabina Welserin.
        To make a blue pudding
        Bruise cornflowers and press them with water through a cloth. If you
        want, blanch almonds in it, whose milk is then blue. Afterwards make a
        pudding with it.

        Next week we’ll look at another popular blue flower, violets.
        (Remember to be careful using flowers for culinary purposes, using
        either flowers grown commercially for that purpose or home grown flowers
        raised without pesticides or other chemicals, especially sprayed on the
        flowers themselves but also those that might have been carried into the
        plant from the roots or leaves.)

        Good Cooking
        Rycheza


        ------------------------------------

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      • David Walddon
        Platina has a salad made entirely from Rosemary flowers (BK 4, #7). Rosemary flowers are gathered in the morning and remain un-washed. They are seasoned with
        Message 3 of 5 , May 7, 2012
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          Platina has a salad made entirely from Rosemary flowers (BK 4, #7). 
          Rosemary flowers are gathered in the morning and remain un-washed. They are seasoned with salt, oil and vinegar.
          Chicory Flowers seasoned with salt, oil and vinegar. (BK 4 #9) and Mallow flowers (BK4, #8) prepared in a similar way. 

          I am not sure I could get enough rosemary flowers for the salad and if I did if I would want to eat very much of it! 

          Eduardo


          Maestro Eduardo Francesco Maria Lucrezia, O.L., O.P. Barone del Corte di AnTir

          David Walddon




          On May 7, 2012, at 12:34 PM, Zachary Smith wrote:

           

          Thanks for the interesting piece. I enjoy eating many flowers (Arugula is probably my favorite. They have some of the radish/nasturtium pepperiness, a little sweet and a peanut-like aftertaste.) but had not considered their use in medieval cooking.
          A cautionary note: I have not tried eating the flowers from my hawthorns, nor am I likely to do so. They have a sort of charnel smell.
           
          Edmund Graham

          From: The Henson's <mhenson@...>
          To: DLCulinaryGuild@yahoogroups.com; Antir_culinary@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Thursday, May 3, 2012 11:24 AM
          Subject: [Antir_culinary] Recipe of the Week May 3rd 2012

          April Showers bring May Flowers, so here we are. Technically a lot of
          things we eat are flowers or parts of flowers; saffron, cloves, capers,
          broccoli, cauliflower. But what we will be talking about here are items
          the average preschooler would consider to be a flower.
                Now I don’t know about you, but growing up, as I did, in the
          mid-west in a middle class home, the thought of eating flowers was
          something quite exotic, despite the fact my Aunt Mary grew a few
          nasturtiums beside her kitchen door for just that purpose.
          While I didn’t happen upon any recipes calling for nasturtiums they were
          mentioned in the Tacuinum Sanitatis

          Garden nasturtiums (Rucola Masturcium) Nature: Warm and humid in the
          first degree. Optimum: the kind that are less strong in flavor,
          Usefulness: They increase coitus and sperm. Dangers: They cause
          headaches. Neutralization of dangers: With endive salad, lettuce and
          vinegar.

          And the familiar salat from the Forme of Curye calls for borage. Either
          the leaves, (when young) or the lovely blue flowers could have been
          used. BTW Borage grows very well in the Northwest and if anyone would
          like a start I’d be glad to oblige! Bees love it and a single plant
          could keep you in flowers all summer.

          Take persel, sauge, garlek, chy-
          bollus, oynouns, leke, borage,
          myntes, poorettes, fenell, and
          towne tressis, rewe, rosmarye,
          purslary, lave & waische hem
          clene, pyke hem pluk hem small
          with thyne honde & myng hem
          wel with rawe oyle, lay on
          vyneger & salt & serve hem forth.

          Diuersa Cibaria published in Cury on Inglysche edited by Constance
          Hieatt and Sharon Butler contributes this recipe calling for hawthorne
          blossoms

          35 Anothur mete that hatte espyne. Nym the floures of theouethorn
          (Hawthorn) clanlichee igedered, & mak grinden in an mortoer al to
          poudre, & sothen tempre with milke of alemauns other of cow; & sothen do
          therto bred othur amydon vor to lyen, & od ayren; & lye wel wyth speces
          & of leues of the thorne, & stey thron floures, & sothen descree


            Corn flowers make a pudding blue in the Cookbook of Sabina Welserin.
          To make a blue pudding
          Bruise cornflowers and press them with water through a cloth. If you
          want, blanch almonds in it, whose milk is then blue. Afterwards make a
          pudding with it.

          Next week we’ll look at another popular blue flower, violets.
          (Remember to be careful using flowers for culinary purposes, using
          either flowers grown commercially for that purpose or home grown flowers
          raised without pesticides or other chemicals, especially sprayed on the
          flowers themselves but also those that might have been carried into the
          plant from the roots or leaves.)

          Good Cooking
          Rycheza


          ------------------------------------

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        • Zachary Smith
          Rosemary flowers are strong, I ve used them as accent ingredients, but never as the primary salad component. Wow, my sinuses are clearing as I think about it.
          Message 4 of 5 , May 7, 2012
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            Rosemary flowers are strong, I've used them as accent ingredients, but never as the primary salad component. Wow, my sinuses are clearing as I think about it.
             
            Edmund Graham

            From: David Walddon <david@...>
            To: Antir_culinary@yahoogroups.com
            Cc: "DLCulinaryGuild@yahoogroups.com" <DLCulinaryGuild@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Monday, May 7, 2012 1:02 PM
            Subject: Re: [Antir_culinary] Recipe of the Week May 3rd 2012

             
            Platina has a salad made entirely from Rosemary flowers (BK 4, #7). 
            Rosemary flowers are gathered in the morning and remain un-washed. They are seasoned with salt, oil and vinegar.
            Chicory Flowers seasoned with salt, oil and vinegar. (BK 4 #9) and Mallow flowers (BK4, #8) prepared in a similar way. 

            I am not sure I could get enough rosemary flowers for the salad and if I did if I would want to eat very much of it! 

            Eduardo


            Maestro Eduardo Francesco Maria Lucrezia, O.L., O.P. Barone del Corte di AnTir

            David Walddon




            On May 7, 2012, at 12:34 PM, Zachary Smith wrote:

             

            Thanks for the interesting piece. I enjoy eating many flowers (Arugula is probably my favorite. They have some of the radish/nasturtium pepperiness, a little sweet and a peanut-like aftertaste.) but had not considered their use in medieval cooking.
            A cautionary note: I have not tried eating the flowers from my hawthorns, nor am I likely to do so. They have a sort of charnel smell.
             
            Edmund Graham

            From: The Henson's <mhenson@...>
            To: DLCulinaryGuild@yahoogroups.com; Antir_culinary@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Thursday, May 3, 2012 11:24 AM
            Subject: [Antir_culinary] Recipe of the Week May 3rd 2012

            April Showers bring May Flowers, so here we are. Technically a lot of
            things we eat are flowers or parts of flowers; saffron, cloves, capers,
            broccoli, cauliflower. But what we will be talking about here are items
            the average preschooler would consider to be a flower.
                  Now I don’t know about you, but growing up, as I did, in the
            mid-west in a middle class home, the thought of eating flowers was
            something quite exotic, despite the fact my Aunt Mary grew a few
            nasturtiums beside her kitchen door for just that purpose.
            While I didn’t happen upon any recipes calling for nasturtiums they were
            mentioned in the Tacuinum Sanitatis

            Garden nasturtiums (Rucola Masturcium) Nature: Warm and humid in the
            first degree. Optimum: the kind that are less strong in flavor,
            Usefulness: They increase coitus and sperm. Dangers: They cause
            headaches. Neutralization of dangers: With endive salad, lettuce and
            vinegar.

            And the familiar salat from the Forme of Curye calls for borage. Either
            the leaves, (when young) or the lovely blue flowers could have been
            used. BTW Borage grows very well in the Northwest and if anyone would
            like a start I’d be glad to oblige! Bees love it and a single plant
            could keep you in flowers all summer.

            Take persel, sauge, garlek, chy-
            bollus, oynouns, leke, borage,
            myntes, poorettes, fenell, and
            towne tressis, rewe, rosmarye,
            purslary, lave & waische hem
            clene, pyke hem pluk hem small
            with thyne honde & myng hem
            wel with rawe oyle, lay on
            vyneger & salt & serve hem forth.

            Diuersa Cibaria published in Cury on Inglysche edited by Constance
            Hieatt and Sharon Butler contributes this recipe calling for hawthorne
            blossoms

            35 Anothur mete that hatte espyne. Nym the floures of theouethorn
            (Hawthorn) clanlichee igedered, & mak grinden in an mortoer al to
            poudre, & sothen tempre with milke of alemauns other of cow; & sothen do
            therto bred othur amydon vor to lyen, & od ayren; & lye wel wyth speces
            & of leues of the thorne, & stey thron floures, & sothen descree


              Corn flowers make a pudding blue in the Cookbook of Sabina Welserin.
            To make a blue pudding
            Bruise cornflowers and press them with water through a cloth. If you
            want, blanch almonds in it, whose milk is then blue. Afterwards make a
            pudding with it.

            Next week we’ll look at another popular blue flower, violets.
            (Remember to be careful using flowers for culinary purposes, using
            either flowers grown commercially for that purpose or home grown flowers
            raised without pesticides or other chemicals, especially sprayed on the
            flowers themselves but also those that might have been carried into the
            plant from the roots or leaves.)

            Good Cooking
            Rycheza


            ------------------------------------

            Yahoo! Groups Links

            <*> To visit your group on the web, go to:
                http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Antir_culinary/

            <*> Your email settings:
                Individual Email | Traditional

            <*> To change settings online go to:
                http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Antir_culinary/join
                (Yahoo! ID required)

            <*> To change settings via email:
                Antir_culinary-digest@yahoogroups.com
                Antir_culinary-fullfeatured@yahoogroups.com

            <*> To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
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          • Johnna Holloway
            I wrote an article that was published in Tournaments Illuminated. It was titled: A Gathering of May pages 13-15 issue 178: Second quarter 2011 May, it turns
            Message 5 of 5 , May 10, 2012
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              I wrote an article that was published in Tournaments Illuminated.
              It was titled: "A Gathering of May" pages 13-15 issue 178: Second quarter 2011 

              May, it turns out is another name of the hawthorn.
              "What many don’t realize when they encounter such passages is that the “May” in these passages often referred to a specific plant, in this case being the blossoms and boughs of the hawthorn. Thomas Jackson in 1626 would helpfully explain “By such a maner or trope of speech, as the English and French doe call the buds or flowers of haw-thorne May.”
               
              I also discuss the association of the flowers with death and the smell of death.

              Johnnae llyn Lewis
               
              On May 7, 2012, at 3:34 PM, Zachary Smith wrote:

               

              Thanks for the interesting piece. I enjoy eating many flowers (Arugula is probably my favorite. They have some of the radish/nasturtium pepperiness, a little sweet and a peanut-like aftertaste.) but had not considered their use in medieval cooking.
              A cautionary note: I have not tried eating the flowers from my hawthorns, nor am I likely to do so. They have a sort of charnel smell.
               
              Edmund Graham


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