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Recipe of the Week, April 5th, 2012

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  • The Henson's
    Pease porridge hot Pease porridge cold Pease porridge in the pot, nine days old. For April I thought a few pea recipes might be interesting. BTW As I write
    Message 1 of 8 , Apr 5, 2012
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      Pease porridge hot
      Pease porridge cold
      Pease porridge in the pot, nine days old.

      For April I thought a few pea recipes might be interesting. BTW As I
      write this, pea sized hail is falling in my yard.

      The pea is one of the oldest cultivated vegetables. Peas have been
      found at archealogical sites in the Middle east dated as early as
      6-7,000 BC and at European sites as early as 3,000 BC. Peas were well
      known to the Greeks and Romans and several recipes for peas can be found
      in de re coquinaria, the cookbook commonly attributed to Apicius. Dried
      Peas were a staple all over Europe and eaten both on fast days, (when
      pea broth stood in for meat broths and other liquids) and on feast days
      when they were often combined with meat, particularly bacon.

      In this final week of Lent we will start with a couple of recipes for
      White peas. Both are from English sources.

      The first comes from Fourme of Curye, John Rylands University Library,
      English MS 7 as transcribed by Daniel Myers available on MedievalCookery.com


      3/.lxx. Pesoun of almayne.

      Tak white pesoun, waysche
      hem, seeth hem a grete while,
      take hem & cole hem throw
      a cloth, waische hem in colde
      watur tyl the hulles go of
      cast hem in a pot & cover hem that
      no breth go out & boyle hem
      ryght wel & cast therinne gode
      mylke of almaundes, & a pertye
      of flour of rys with poudour
      ginger, safroun and salt.

      The second hails from the end of our period and
      The Second part of the good Hus-wiues Iewell.
      AT LONDON
      Printed by E. Allde for Edward
      White, dwelling at the little North
      doore of Paules Church at
      the signe of the Gun,
      1597.


      For White pease pottage.
      4/ Take a quart of white Pease or more & seeth them in faire water
      close, vntill they doe cast their huskes, the white cast away, as long
      as any wil come vp to the topp, and when they be gon, then put into the
      peaze two dishes of butter, and a little vergious, with pepper and salt,
      and a little fine powder of March, and so let it stand till you will
      occupy it, and thē serue it vpon sops. You may soe the Porpose and Seale
      in your Pease, seruing it forth two peeces in a dish.

      Good Cooking
      Rycheza
    • Zachary Smith
      I favor porridges, so thanks for sharing these. The term powder of March is a new one and I can make arguments for several spice blends in this context. Does
      Message 2 of 8 , Apr 5, 2012
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        I favor porridges, so thanks for sharing these. The term powder of March is a new one and I can make arguments for several spice blends in this context. Does anyone of you have an explanation to share?
         
        Thanks,
        Edmund Graham

        From: The Henson's <mhenson@...>
        To: DLCulinaryGuild@yahoogroups.com; Antir_culinary@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Thursday, April 5, 2012 1:34 PM
        Subject: [Antir_culinary] Recipe of the Week, April 5th, 2012

         
        Pease porridge hot
        Pease porridge cold
        Pease porridge in the pot, nine days old.

        For April I thought a few pea recipes might be interesting. BTW As I
        write this, pea sized hail is falling in my yard.

        The pea is one of the oldest cultivated vegetables. Peas have been
        found at archealogical sites in the Middle east dated as early as
        6-7,000 BC and at European sites as early as 3,000 BC. Peas were well
        known to the Greeks and Romans and several recipes for peas can be found
        in de re coquinaria, the cookbook commonly attributed to Apicius. Dried
        Peas were a staple all over Europe and eaten both on fast days, (when
        pea broth stood in for meat broths and other liquids) and on feast days
        when they were often combined with meat, particularly bacon.

        In this final week of Lent we will start with a couple of recipes for
        White peas. Both are from English sources.

        The first comes from Fourme of Curye, John Rylands University Library,
        English MS 7 as transcribed by Daniel Myers available on MedievalCookery.com

        3/.lxx. Pesoun of almayne.

        Tak white pesoun, waysche
        hem, seeth hem a grete while,
        take hem & cole hem throw
        a cloth, waische hem in colde
        watur tyl the hulles go of
        cast hem in a pot & cover hem that
        no breth go out & boyle hem
        ryght wel & cast therinne gode
        mylke of almaundes, & a pertye
        of flour of rys with poudour
        ginger, safroun and salt.

        The second hails from the end of our period and
        The Second part of the good Hus-wiues Iewell.
        AT LONDON
        Printed by E. Allde for Edward
        White, dwelling at the little North
        doore of Paules Church at
        the signe of the Gun,
        1597.

        For White pease pottage.
        4/ Take a quart of white Pease or more & seeth them in faire water
        close, vntill they doe cast their huskes, the white cast away, as long
        as any wil come vp to the topp, and when they be gon, then put into the
        peaze two dishes of butter, and a little vergious, with pepper and salt,
        and a little fine powder of March, and so let it stand till you will
        occupy it, and thē serue it vpon sops. You may soe the Porpose and Seale
        in your Pease, seruing it forth two peeces in a dish.

        Good Cooking
        Rycheza


      • Johnna Holloway
        See Charles Perry s explanation here: http://articles.latimes.com/2004/feb/18/food/fo-hampton18/2 Ground celery seed (if indeed that is what is meant by fine
        Message 3 of 8 , Apr 5, 2012
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          See Charles Perry's explanation here:


          "Ground celery seed (if indeed that is what is meant by "fine powder of March" -- "march" is an old name for wild celery) adds a wild, herbal flavor that cuts the stodginess of split peas."

          Johnna

          On Apr 5, 2012, at 7:30 PM, Zachary Smith wrote:

          fine powder of March

        • Zachary Smith
          Thanks, Johnna.   Not to doubt my lady, is there any corraboration besides an article in the LA Times? ________________________________ From: Johnna Holloway
          Message 4 of 8 , Apr 6, 2012
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            Thanks, Johnna.
             
            Not to doubt my lady, is there any corraboration besides an article in the LA Times?

            From: Johnna Holloway <johnnae@...>
            To: Antir_culinary@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Thursday, April 5, 2012 4:38 PM
            Subject: Re: [Antir_culinary] Recipe of the Week, April 5th, 2012

             
            See Charles Perry's explanation here:

            http://articles.latimes.com/2004/feb/18/food/fo-hampton18/2

            "Ground celery seed (if indeed that is what is meant by "fine powder of March" -- "march" is an old name for wild celery) adds a wild, herbal flavor that cuts the stodginess of split peas."

            Johnna

            On Apr 5, 2012, at 7:30 PM, Zachary Smith wrote:

            fine powder of March



          • wheezul@canby.com
            This may or may not corroborate what is powder of march, but in the Bald s Leechbook of the 9th century there is more than one remedy calling for ground seeds
            Message 5 of 8 , Apr 6, 2012
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              This may or may not corroborate what is powder of march, but in the Bald's
              Leechbook of the 9th century there is more than one remedy calling for
              ground seeds of marche. THE OED also has quite a few references to march
              as
              "Wild celery, Apium graveolens.
              In some quots. perh. denoting other related plants of the family Apiaceae
              ( Umbelliferae), more usually referred to with distinguishing word, as
              Stanmarch"

              The link for the Leechbook is here. I have never heard of it before (not
              surprising), but it seems pretty fascinating - especially for an earlier
              persona.

              http://archive.org/details/leechdomswortcun02cock

              Johnna probably will have a much better answer.

              Katherine

              > Thanks, Johnna.
              >  
              > Not to doubt my lady, is there any corraboration besides an article in the
              > LA Times?
              >
              >
              > ________________________________
              > From: Johnna Holloway <johnnae@...>
              > To: Antir_culinary@yahoogroups.com
              > Sent: Thursday, April 5, 2012 4:38 PM
              > Subject: Re: [Antir_culinary] Recipe of the Week, April 5th, 2012
              >
              >
              >
              >  
              >
              > See Charles Perry's explanation here:
              >
              >
              > http://articles.latimes.com/2004/feb/18/food/fo-hampton18/2
              >
              > "Ground celery seed (if indeed that is what is meant by "fine powder of
              > March" -- "march" is an old name for wild celery) adds a wild, herbal
              > flavor that cuts the stodginess of split peas."
              >
              > Johnna
              >
              >
              >
              > On Apr 5, 2012, at 7:30 PM, Zachary Smith wrote:
              >
              > fine powder of March
              >
              >
            • Johnna Holloway
              Actually it was more than just an LA Times article. It was by Charles Perry who is a rather well known food historian. He s retired now, so we can t read his
              Message 6 of 8 , Apr 6, 2012
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                Actually it was more than just an LA Times article. It was by Charles Perry
                who is a rather well known food historian. He's retired now, so we can't read his
                historical notes on a weekly basis.

                As Katharine mentioned, OED does list the first entry for march with these forms

                Forms:  eOE merici, OE merce, OE merece (Northumbrian), OE meric (Northumbrian), OE myrce, OE–eME merc, OE–eME merice, lOE mearce, ME merch, ME–15 marche, ME–16 merche, lME merege, 15 18 march
                Etymology:  Cognate with Old Saxon merk , merka (in glosses; Middle Low German merk ), Old High German merc (compare also Old High German merrich ; German Merk ), Old Icelandic merki , Norwegian merke , Old Swedish märke , merkie (Swedish märke ), Danish mærke (in Danish, and sometimes in Swedish, denoting water parsnip, which was formerly included in the genus Apium); the North Germanic forms may represent loans from a West Germanic language. 

                Also attested in place names, as Merceham (1086; now Marcham, Oxfordshire), Merceode (1086), Merchewude (1254; now Marchwood, Hampshire), and in compounds,  

                  Wild celery, Apium graveolens.In some quots. perh. denoting other related plants of the family Apiaceae ( Umbelliferae), 

                Not only does one find it in the earlier manuscripts but it turns up in even the printed 16th century literature.

                1525   Herball sig. A.iv,   Apium is an herbe that men do call Smalache, other Merche [?1543 Marche].

                The Middle English Dictionary under the entry merch(e (n.) Also marche, (early) merc(e, (late) merege[ OE merece]

                (a) Any of several celery-like plants; celery (Apium graveolens), wild celery, smallage, etc.; merche(s sed, seed of the plant; merches wirtrume, root of the plant; (b) ?in place names [see Smith PNElem. 2.39].

                Hope this helps,

                Johnna

                On Apr 6, 2012, at 1:28 PM, Zachary Smith wrote:


                Thanks, Johnna.
                 
                Not to doubt my lady, is there any corraboration besides an article in the LA Times?

                From: Johnna Holloway <johnnae@...>
                To: Antir_culinary@yahoogroups.com 
                Sent: Thursday, April 5, 2012 4:38 PM
                Subject: Re: [Antir_culinary] Recipe of the Week, April 5th, 2012

                 
                See Charles Perry's explanation here:


                "Ground celery seed (if indeed that is what is meant by "fine powder of March" -- "march" is an old name for wild celery) adds a wild, herbal flavor that cuts the stodginess of split peas."

                Johnna

                On Apr 5, 2012, at 7:30 PM, Zachary Smith wrote:

                fine powder of March





              • Zachary Smith
                Thank-you, that makes me feel much better about it.   Edmund ________________________________ From: Johnna Holloway To:
                Message 7 of 8 , Apr 8, 2012
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                  Thank-you, that makes me feel much better about it.
                   
                  Edmund

                  From: Johnna Holloway <johnnae@...>
                  To: Antir_culinary@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Friday, April 6, 2012 5:18 PM
                  Subject: Re: [Antir_culinary] Recipe of the Week, April 5th, 2012

                   
                  Actually it was more than just an LA Times article. It was by Charles Perry
                  who is a rather well known food historian. He's retired now, so we can't read his
                  historical notes on a weekly basis.

                  As Katharine mentioned, OED does list the first entry for march with these forms

                  Forms:  eOE merici, OE merce, OE merece (Northumbrian), OE meric (Northumbrian), OE myrce, OE–eME merc, OE–eME merice, lOE mearce, ME merch, ME–15 marche, ME–16 merche, lME merege, 15 18 march
                  Etymology:  Cognate with Old Saxon merk , merka (in glosses; Middle Low German merk ), Old High German merc (compare also Old High German merrich ; German Merk ), Old Icelandic merki , Norwegian merke , Old Swedish märke , merkie (Swedish märke ), Danish mærke (in Danish, and sometimes in Swedish, denoting water parsnip, which was formerly included in the genus Apium); the North Germanic forms may represent loans from a West Germanic language. 
                  Also attested in place names, as Merceham (1086; now Marcham, Oxfordshire), Merceode (1086), Merchewude (1254; now Marchwood, Hampshire), and in compounds,  

                    Wild celery, Apium graveolens.In some quots. perh. denoting other related plants of the family Apiaceae ( Umbelliferae), 

                  Not only does one find it in the earlier manuscripts but it turns up in even the printed 16th century literature.

                  1525   Herball sig. A.iv,   Apium is an herbe that men do call Smalache, other Merche [?1543 Marche].

                  The Middle English Dictionary under the entry merch(e (n.) Also marche, (early) merc(e, (late) merege[ OE merece]
                  (a) Any of several celery-like plants; celery (Apium graveolens), wild celery, smallage, etc.; merche(s sed, seed of the plant; merches wirtrume, root of the plant; (b) ?in place names [see Smith PNElem. 2.39].
                  Hope this helps,

                  Johnna

                  On Apr 6, 2012, at 1:28 PM, Zachary Smith wrote:


                  Thanks, Johnna.
                   
                  Not to doubt my lady, is there any corraboration besides an article in the LA Times?

                  From: Johnna Holloway <johnnae@...>
                  To: Antir_culinary@yahoogroups.com 
                  Sent: Thursday, April 5, 2012 4:38 PM
                  Subject: Re: [Antir_culinary] Recipe of the Week, April 5th, 2012

                   
                  See Charles Perry's explanation here:

                  http://articles.latimes.com/2004/feb/18/food/fo-hampton18/2

                  "Ground celery seed (if indeed that is what is meant by "fine powder of March" -- "march" is an old name for wild celery) adds a wild, herbal flavor that cuts the stodginess of split peas."

                  Johnna

                  On Apr 5, 2012, at 7:30 PM, Zachary Smith wrote:

                  fine powder of March







                • Zachary Smith
                  Thank you, too. I m working down the chronological list.   Edmund ________________________________ From: wheezul@canby.com To:
                  Message 8 of 8 , Apr 8, 2012
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Thank you, too. I'm working down the chronological list.
                     
                    Edmund

                    From: "wheezul@..." <wheezul@...>
                    To: Antir_culinary@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Friday, April 6, 2012 11:30 AM
                    Subject: Re: [Antir_culinary] Recipe of the Week, April 5th, 2012

                     
                    This may or may not corroborate what is powder of march, but in the Bald's
                    Leechbook of the 9th century there is more than one remedy calling for
                    ground seeds of marche. THE OED also has quite a few references to march
                    as
                    "Wild celery, Apium graveolens.
                    In some quots. perh. denoting other related plants of the family Apiaceae
                    ( Umbelliferae), more usually referred to with distinguishing word, as
                    Stanmarch"

                    The link for the Leechbook is here. I have never heard of it before (not
                    surprising), but it seems pretty fascinating - especially for an earlier
                    persona.

                    http://archive.org/details/leechdomswortcun02cock

                    Johnna probably will have a much better answer.

                    Katherine

                    > Thanks, Johnna.
                    >  
                    > Not to doubt my lady, is there any corraboration besides an article in the
                    > LA Times?
                    >
                    >
                    > ________________________________
                    > From: Johnna Holloway <johnnae@...>
                    > To: Antir_culinary@yahoogroups.com
                    > Sent: Thursday, April 5, 2012 4:38 PM
                    > Subject: Re: [Antir_culinary] Recipe of the Week, April 5th, 2012
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >  
                    >
                    > See Charles Perry's explanation here:
                    >
                    >
                    > http://articles.latimes.com/2004/feb/18/food/fo-hampton18/2
                    >
                    > "Ground celery seed (if indeed that is what is meant by "fine powder of
                    > March" -- "march" is an old name for wild celery) adds a wild, herbal
                    > flavor that cuts the stodginess of split peas."
                    >
                    > Johnna
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > On Apr 5, 2012, at 7:30 PM, Zachary Smith wrote:
                    >
                    > fine powder of March
                    >
                    >



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