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Recipe of the Week, February 5th, 2012

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  • The Henson's
    In the depths of winter one needs something a bit hearty to stick to the ribs. Why not start with a hearty bowl of oatmeal as we look at grain cookery in this
    Message 1 of 3 , Feb 5, 2012
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      In the depths of winter one needs something a bit hearty to stick to the
      ribs. Why not start with a hearty bowl of oatmeal as we look at grain
      cookery in this cruelest month.

      Oats do not appear often in Medieval cookbooks, but a few recipes do
      turn up here and there. Das Kochbuch des Meisters Eberhard (Translation
      of the 15th century recipe collection and dietetics text from the court
      of Bayern-Landshut by Giano Balestriere is available in the
      Florigelieum.) lumps oats in along with spelt and millet;
      “Eating millet chills and dries the body and constipates and does not
      nourish well, and oats and spelt do the same.”

      The Inntakochbockl, (An early 16th century recipe collection from
      Bavaria translated by Giano Balestriere, also available in the
      Florigelieum.) gives us this recipe for oat porridge.

      How to make oat porridge and oatmeal.
      Take a /meczen/ [Metze, a volume measure] of good oats and /reitter/
      (grind?) it well and boil it until you can see the white kernels. Then
      dry it and pound it so that the kernel becomes pure (is separated?).
      And from Roberto de Nola’s Libre del Coch (English translation by Robin
      Carroll-Mann as available at the Florigelium.) we have:

      118. OATMEAL GRUEL AND BARLEY GRUEL AVENATE Y ORDIATE

      Take peeled almonds and grind them in a mortar; then blend them with
      good broth if you will have it so; if not, [blend them] with salt and
      water and oil; then strain it through a woolen cloth so that it will be
      thin; then take the oats and make flour from it, then set it to cook by
      itself; and when it is more than half cooked, strain it through a woolen
      cloth that is thick; and let the oats be somewhat thin that they may be
      better strained; and when you have strained them, mix it with the almond
      milk, and set it to cook on the fire with a piece of sugar in it, which
      is white, in the pot; and cook it a good hour and a half until it is
      quite thick, and taste it for salt; and prepare dishes, and cast sugar
      upon them; and in this same manner barley is made.

      My apologies for being a bit late out of the gate this month. I was a
      bit busy this last week. Our Baronial Art & Sciences competition was
      held this Saturday and I am pleased to report that My Lord Husband, THL
      Matuesz z Plocka, emerged victorious. And there was the little thing of
      luncheon that I was in charge of for the event.

      Next week I'll be back on time with a few more grainy recipes.
    • Mandy
      This is what I came up for oatmeal (on my site/link) http://oldfoodways.info/otemealegrotes.html it definitely sticks to your ribs! Mandy/ Mergriet van
      Message 2 of 3 , Feb 11, 2012
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        This is what I came up for oatmeal (on my site/link)

        http://oldfoodways.info/otemealegrotes.html

        it definitely sticks to your ribs!

        Mandy/
        Mergriet van Wijenhorst
      • The Henson's
        Looks Yummy, Mergriet Rycheza
        Message 3 of 3 , Feb 12, 2012
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          Looks Yummy, Mergriet

          Rycheza

          On 2/11/2012 8:09 PM, Mandy wrote:
          >
          >
          > This is what I came up for oatmeal (on my site/link)
          >
          > http://oldfoodways.info/otemealegrotes.html
          >
          > it definitely sticks to your ribs!
          >
          > Mandy/
          > Mergriet van Wijenhorst
          >
          >
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