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Recipe of the Week. Nov 16th, 2011

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  • The Henson's
    A few tidbits and an English recipe. Sweet apples were considered warm and humid in the second degree, while sour apples were cold and dry in the second degree
    Message 1 of 1 , Nov 17, 2011
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      A few tidbits and an English recipe.

      Sweet apples were considered warm and humid in the second degree, while
      sour apples were cold and dry in the second degree according to the
      Tacuinum Sanitatis. Sweet apples were considered to comfort the heart
      while the sour were good for fainting, but there were dangers as well.
      Sweet apples were bad for the nerves although this could be avoided if
      they were served with rose-colored sugar or honey. Sour apples were bad
      for the joints but not if served with yellow-colored wine.

      Apple fritters were to be served hot as John Russel’s Boke of Nurture
      says “Appule fruture is good hoot but the cold ye not towche.”

      The recipe below is from a text a bit beyond our period. It comes from
      Robert May The Accomplisht Cook or The Art and Mastery of Cookery, 1685,
      with foreword, Introduction and Glossary supplied by Alan Davidson,
      Marcus Bell and Tom Jaine. Prospect books 2000


      To make the best Fritters
      Take good mutton broth being cold, and no fat, mix it with flour and
      eggs, some salt beaten nutmeg and ginger, beat them well together, then
      have apples or pippins, pare and core them, and cut them into dice-work,
      or square bits, and when you will fry them, put them in the batter, and
      fry them in clear clarified suet, or clarified butter, fry them white
      and fine, and sugar them.


      Good Cooking
      Rycheza
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