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Recipe of the week August 10th, 2011

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  • The Henson's
    More herb tarts this week! Maybe I should re-title this column Recipes of the Week as I am sharing several each week. These are all from the Cookbook of Sabina
    Message 1 of 3 , Aug 11, 2011
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      More herb tarts this week! Maybe I should re-title this column Recipes
      of the Week as I am sharing several each week.

      These are all from the Cookbook of Sabina Welserin (1553) as translated
      by Valoise Armstrong and are available on line. This a German manuscript
      of over 200 recipes and one of the earliest collection attributed to a
      woman. Sabina came from a wealthy merchant family with close ties to
      royalty. (A cousin eloped with a member of the royal family, Phillipa
      has her own cookbook as well.) The recipes come from a wide variety of
      sources with many pie recipes of various types, including fruit, meat
      and custards. A lot of custards, I think she must have been fond of them.

      Not all of these mention a crust, but it seems logical to assume one
      when the recipe is for a 'tart'. Please note the Genovese tart; the
      fresh cheese for six ounces of curdled milk seem odd and most people,
      myself included usually go for 6 ounces of fresh cheese instead. I know
      we have some cheese-makers out here and would like to hear an opinion on
      the matter. Genovese tarts also show up in other manuscripts, but are
      often quite different. A little later in the month we will look at one
      or more of them.

      30 To make Genovese tart
      Take eighteen ounces of chard or spinach, three ounces of grated cheese,
      two and one half ounces of olive oil and the fresh cheese from six
      ounces of curdled milk [2]. And blanch the herbs and chop them small and
      stir it all together and make a good covered tart with it. [2] This type
      of cheese is known today as Quark in Germany and Topfen in Austria.

      106 To make an herb tart
      Take one handful of sage, a handful of marjoram and some lavender and
      rosemary, also a handful of chard, and chop it together, take six eggs,
      sugar, cinnamon, cloves, raisins and rose water and let it bake.

      133 An herb tart
      First, take a small handful of hyssop, mint, chard and sage. There
      should be three times more of chard than of the other herbs, according
      to how large one will make the tart. Take clarified butter and fry the
      herbs named above therein, take raisins, small currants and sugar, as
      much as you feel is right. Take then eight eggs, beat them carefully
      into that which is described above and make a pastry shell with an egg
      and bake it slowly.

      139 A green tart
      Take chard, pull it to pieces like a cabbage, put with it parsley, sage
      and marjoram, chop everything together well, roast it in fat, take five
      eggs and grated bread, stir it also therein, put sugar into it and
      spices and make a pastry shell as for tripe and put the herbs on top and
      bake it as for any other tart.

      Good Cooking
      Rycheza
    • wheezul@canby.com
      ... I ve been working with quite a few late SCA period German cookbooks. Custard foods are quite common. I ve really been thinking that it would be fun to put
      Message 2 of 3 , Aug 16, 2011
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        > These are all from the Cookbook of Sabina Welserin (1553) as translated
        > by Valoise Armstrong and are available on line. This a German manuscript
        > of over 200 recipes and one of the earliest collection attributed to a
        > woman. Sabina came from a wealthy merchant family with close ties to
        > royalty. (A cousin eloped with a member of the royal family, Phillipa
        > has her own cookbook as well.) The recipes come from a wide variety of
        > sources with many pie recipes of various types, including fruit, meat
        > and custards. A lot of custards, I think she must have been fond of them.

        I've been working with quite a few late SCA period German cookbooks.
        Custard foods are quite common. I've really been thinking that it would
        be fun to put together a little German cookbook for custards and different
        types of what we call 'puddings' that would appeal to a modern palate.

        >
        > Not all of these mention a crust, but it seems logical to assume one
        > when the recipe is for a 'tart'. Please note the Genovese tart; the
        > fresh cheese for six ounces of curdled milk seem odd and most people,
        > myself included usually go for 6 ounces of fresh cheese instead. I know
        > we have some cheese-makers out here and would like to hear an opinion on
        > the matter. Genovese tarts also show up in other manuscripts, but are
        > often quite different. A little later in the month we will look at one
        > or more of them.

        I have been fascinated about this usage of fresh cheese, and have made my
        own quark from milk and buttermilk. It is delicious and makes the best
        cheesecakes ever. My German mom was in heaven - she couldn't find quark,
        and the stuff they carry in my deli is $6 a quart.

        Basically one curdles milk with buttermilk and strains the curds through a
        cheesecloth and strainer. There are some different methods out on the
        internet. I think it would be worth a try for this tart!

        I'm alsy trying to determine if a German tart must always have a crust.
        Often they are not specified.

        Katherine

        >
        > 30 To make Genovese tart
        > Take eighteen ounces of chard or spinach, three ounces of grated cheese,
        > two and one half ounces of olive oil and the fresh cheese from six
        > ounces of curdled milk [2]. And blanch the herbs and chop them small and
        > stir it all together and make a good covered tart with it. [2] This type
        > of cheese is known today as Quark in Germany and Topfen in Austria.
        > Good Cooking
        > Rycheza
        >
      • The Henson's
        ... I d be up for work on a custard/pudding book. (I m personally fond of custards.) We are starting work on a cheese booklet here in Dragons Laire and have a
        Message 3 of 3 , Aug 16, 2011
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          On 8/16/2011 2:23 PM, wheezul@... wrote:

          > I've been working with quite a few late SCA period German cookbooks.
          > Custard foods are quite common. I've really been thinking that it would
          > be fun to put together a little German cookbook for custards and different
          > types of what we call 'puddings' that would appeal to a modern palate.

          I'd be up for work on a custard/pudding book. (I'm personally fond of
          custards.) We are starting work on a cheese booklet here in Dragons
          Laire and have a vegetable dish booklet in the works, although that is
          going very slowly.

          Our "Small Selection" booklet from our demo recipes has our redaction of
          'another tart' recipe from the Sabina cookbook. It is one of the first I
          started working with over coals. I picked it because it called for heat
          above and below like in a dutch oven. We don't currently do it up in a
          crust. It is a real favorite with the cook staff.

          Maybe some little cookbooks would be a good project for the guild. It
          would be something we could offer for largess that would help promote
          what we are doing.

          Rycheza
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