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Re: [Antirculinary] Recipe of the Week November 4th, 2010

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  • FV/Rafaella
    Isn t the sops the bread? (in the direction pour over sops )? Rafaella
    Message 1 of 5 , Nov 5, 2010
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      Isn't the "sops" the bread? (in the direction "pour over sops")?
      Rafaella

      --- On Thu, 11/4/10, The Henson's <mhenson@...> wrote:

      > From: The Henson's <mhenson@...>
      > Subject: [Antirculinary] Recipe of the Week November 4th, 2010
      > To: DLCulinaryGuild@yahoogroups.com, "antir cg" <Antirculinary@yahoogroups.com>
      > Date: Thursday, November 4, 2010, 11:02 PM
      > The Vivendier, Northern France, Mid
      > fifteenth century.
      >
      > This month we turn to another French source.
      >
      > The English Translations used here are from “The
      > Viviendier, a fifteenth
      > century French Cookery Manuscript, A critical edition with
      > English
      > Translations by Terrence Scully.  The Vivendier is not
      > to be confused
      > with the earlier Viandier to which it is often compared.
      > Although there
      > are many similar dishes in each, other dishes reflect newer
      > trends in
      > French cookery.
      >
      > The Kassel manuscript which contains the Vivendier with its
      > 66 recipes,
      > is a collection of medical and botanical information along
      > with
      > household and personal advice. Linguistic evidence, which I
      > won’t even
      > try to summarize here, places it in the north of France and
      > somewhere in
      > the mid fifteenth century.
      >
      >    Soupe de Quaresme
      >
      >    Lenten sops.  Get pea puree,
      > powdered cumin and saffron, put two
      >       quarts of puree and a goblet of wine -
      > and if you use verjuice,
      > put in less,some alt, judiciously. Boil. Pour very hot over
      > sops.
      >
      > Sops turn up in many, many variations in many period
      > cookbooks. They are
      > in their most basic form merely something liquidy, usually
      > hot,  poured
      > over toasted bread.  The infamous chipped beef on
      > toast is a modern
      > survival of this custom. Sops are a dish I have enjoyed for
      > many years.
      > I just never knew they were called sops. One of my favorite
      > breakfasts
      > is leftover turkey gravy or any gravy or sort of sauced
      > meat poured over
      > toast.
      >
      > I think this dish could be easily adapted as a soup for a
      > feast or dinner.
      >
      >
      > RzP
      >
      >
      > ------------------------------------
      >
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >     Antirculinary-fullfeatured@yahoogroups.com
      >
      >
      >
    • The Henson's
      I have always thought so, but I have seen many recipes use sops in the title so I think it got to be a general description of a dish as well as the bread
      Message 2 of 5 , Nov 5, 2010
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        I have always thought so, but I have seen many recipes use sops in the
        title so I think it got to be a general description of a dish as well as
        the bread itself. I am not sure what would be a modern example of the
        same sort of creep, maybe casserole, or sandwich, where the word
        describes both the equipment and process.

        How ya doing? BTW Up early or late or just again?

        RzP

        FV/Rafaella wrote:
        > Isn't the "sops" the bread? (in the direction "pour over sops")?
        > Rafaella
        >
        > --- On Thu, 11/4/10, The Henson's <mhenson@...> wrote:
        >
        >> From: The Henson's <mhenson@...>
        >> Subject: [Antirculinary] Recipe of the Week November 4th, 2010
        >> To: DLCulinaryGuild@yahoogroups.com, "antir cg" <Antirculinary@yahoogroups.com>
        >> Date: Thursday, November 4, 2010, 11:02 PM
        >> The Vivendier, Northern France, Mid
        >> fifteenth century.
        >>
        >> This month we turn to another French source.
        >>
        >> The English Translations used here are from “The
        >> Viviendier, a fifteenth
        >> century French Cookery Manuscript, A critical edition with
        >> English
        >> Translations by Terrence Scully. The Vivendier is not
        >> to be confused
        >> with the earlier Viandier to which it is often compared.
        >> Although there
        >> are many similar dishes in each, other dishes reflect newer
        >> trends in
        >> French cookery.
        >>
        >> The Kassel manuscript which contains the Vivendier with its
        >> 66 recipes,
        >> is a collection of medical and botanical information along
        >> with
        >> household and personal advice. Linguistic evidence, which I
        >> won’t even
        >> try to summarize here, places it in the north of France and
        >> somewhere in
        >> the mid fifteenth century.
        >>
        >> Soupe de Quaresme
        >>
        >> Lenten sops. Get pea puree,
        >> powdered cumin and saffron, put two
        >> quarts of puree and a goblet of wine -
        >> and if you use verjuice,
        >> put in less,some alt, judiciously. Boil. Pour very hot over
        >> sops.
        >>
      • Zach Smith
        I, too, have read of this sloppy transition: Sops soups supper (being a lighter meal often consisting of sops). It would be easier on communication if sops
        Message 3 of 5 , Nov 5, 2010
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          I, too, have read of this sloppy transition: Sops>>soups>> supper (being a lighter meal often consisting of sops).

          It would be easier on communication if sops were restricted to the stuff in the bowl over which the (semi?) liquid is poured. We have other simple words for the liquids (broth, for example), but "sops" is the best we're likely to get for the possibly toasted, possibly torn-up pieces of bread or whatever.

          Sgt. Edmund

          -----Original Message-----
          From: Antirculinary@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Antirculinary@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of The Henson's
          Sent: Friday, November 05, 2010 8:06 AM
          To: Antirculinary@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [Antirculinary] Recipe of the Week November 4th, 2010

          I have always thought so, but I have seen many recipes use sops in the
          title so I think it got to be a general description of a dish as well as
          the bread itself. I am not sure what would be a modern example of the
          same sort of creep, maybe casserole, or sandwich, where the word
          describes both the equipment and process.

          How ya doing? BTW Up early or late or just again?

          RzP

          FV/Rafaella wrote:
          > Isn't the "sops" the bread? (in the direction "pour over sops")?
          > Rafaella
          >
          > --- On Thu, 11/4/10, The Henson's <mhenson@...> wrote:
          >
          >> From: The Henson's <mhenson@...>
          >> Subject: [Antirculinary] Recipe of the Week November 4th, 2010
          >> To: DLCulinaryGuild@yahoogroups.com, "antir cg" <Antirculinary@yahoogroups.com>
          >> Date: Thursday, November 4, 2010, 11:02 PM
          >> The Vivendier, Northern France, Mid
          >> fifteenth century.
          >>
          >> This month we turn to another French source.
          >>
          >> The English Translations used here are from “The
          >> Viviendier, a fifteenth
          >> century French Cookery Manuscript, A critical edition with
          >> English
          >> Translations by Terrence Scully. The Vivendier is not
          >> to be confused
          >> with the earlier Viandier to which it is often compared.
          >> Although there
          >> are many similar dishes in each, other dishes reflect newer
          >> trends in
          >> French cookery.
          >>
          >> The Kassel manuscript which contains the Vivendier with its
          >> 66 recipes,
          >> is a collection of medical and botanical information along
          >> with
          >> household and personal advice. Linguistic evidence, which I
          >> won’t even
          >> try to summarize here, places it in the north of France and
          >> somewhere in
          >> the mid fifteenth century.
          >>
          >> Soupe de Quaresme
          >>
          >> Lenten sops. Get pea puree,
          >> powdered cumin and saffron, put two
          >> quarts of puree and a goblet of wine -
          >> and if you use verjuice,
          >> put in less,some alt, judiciously. Boil. Pour very hot over
          >> sops.
          >>


          ------------------------------------

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        • The Henson's
          test - I am getting bounced messages so trying another path. RzP
          Message 4 of 5 , Nov 5, 2010
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            test - I am getting bounced messages so trying another path.

            RzP
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