Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: [AnthonyBraxtonProject] 1975 adds

Expand Messages
  • Michael Fitzgerald
    I have new information that I believe corrects a widespread error in Braxton discography - widespread probably because the issue itself supplies the wrong date
    Message 1 of 18 , Nov 16, 2005
      I have new information that I believe corrects a
      widespread error in Braxton discography -
      widespread probably because the issue itself
      supplies the wrong date and this error has
      entered into the standard discographical reference works.

      New Tone CD 7005 "News From The '70s" includes a
      performance of Composition 23E from Gröningen,
      Netherlands, reportedly either May 16 or 17, 1974.

      However, I believe the year should be 1975, based on Coda 8/75 p.29:

      "Groningen, Holland was the location of a
      festival on May 16-17 which featured Anthony
      Braxton, Willie Mabon, Sammy Price's Harlem
      Beggars, Mary Buggs, Association P.C., Willem
      Breuker, Chris McGregor's Brotherhood of Breath,
      Slide Hampton, Carmell Jones and Leo Wright, Theo
      Loevendi, Charles Tolliver's Music Inc., Randy Weston and the Frank Wright 4."

      In 1974, May 16 was a Thursday, an unlikely day
      for the start of a 2-day festival. In 1975, May 16 was a Friday.

      Mike

      P.S. - A hale and hearty hello to Rick Lopez!


      mike at JazzDiscography.com
      http://www.JazzDiscography.com
    • Jason Guthartz
      ... Mighty impressive sleuthing, Mike! -Jason (revising the disco)
      Message 2 of 18 , Nov 18, 2005
        --- In AnthonyBraxtonProject@yahoogroups.com, Michael Fitzgerald
        > New Tone CD 7005 "News From The '70s" includes a
        > performance of Composition 23E from Gröningen,
        > Netherlands, reportedly either May 16 or 17, 1974.
        >
        > However, I believe the year should be 1975...

        Mighty impressive sleuthing, Mike!

        -Jason (revising the disco)
      • Michael Fitzgerald
        This review is of the first of two nights (April 29 & 30, 1977), according to NYT 4/24/77 p.D40. No recording to my knowledge. NYT 5/1/77 p.70
        Message 3 of 18 , Nov 29, 2005
          This review is of the first of two nights (April 29 & 30, 1977),
          according to NYT 4/24/77 p.D40. No recording to my knowledge.

          NYT 5/1/77 p.70
          =================================

          Three Reed Players Improvise at Kitchen

          Roscoe Mitchell, Joseph Jarman, and Anthony Braxton, who performed
          music for varying combinations of saxophones, clarinets, and flutes
          at the Kitchen Friday, were the most promising young reed players of
          the Chicago jazz avant-garde 10 years ago. Today they are practically
          elder statesmen. A school of improvisational reed playing has sprung
          up behind them, and this is not surprising, for they have opened jazz
          to an unprecedented palette of instrumental sounds while
          demonstrating that spontaneity and a thoughtful approach to
          structural organization need not be incompatible.

          Between them, the three musicians played more than 20 woodwinds
          during their concert at the Kitchen, but the unusual instrumentation
          was not employed for its shock value. Even a piece for bass and
          contrabass saxophones, composed by Mr. Braxton, avoided cuteness. The
          switching of instruments by individual players took place in an
          orderly fashion; it did not intrude on the flow of the music.

          The trio played pieces by Mr. Mitchell and Mr. Braxton at Friday's
          concert, with Mr. Jarman's compositions set for another day, and the
          bravura contrapuntal passages, silences, variations in dynamics and
          timbre, and satisfying resolutions into chords and unisons the two
          writers provided guided the collective improvising without
          unnecessarily circumscribing it.

          Mr. Jarman, who plays a battery of wind, percussion, and stringed
          instruments when performing as a member of the Art Ensemble of
          Chicago and is not often heard soloing at length, turned in several
          captivating statements, especially a breathy tenor saxophone rhapsody
          and some celebratory bass clarinet solos.

          Mr. Mitchell, who never plays a phrase when a note will do, was
          catapulted into an alto saxophone improvisation of staggering
          vitality and richness by one of Mr. Braxton's composed passages. Mr.
          Braxton was particularly effective on his huge contrabass saxophone,
          on alto saxophone, and on his regular and contrabass clarinets.

          - Robert Palmer

          ===========================================

          Mike



          mike at JazzDiscography.com
          http://www.JazzDiscography.com
        • David Wight
          Mike, I was there, both nights, total of 4 sets. There were 27 instruments set up on the stage. The music both nights was phenomenal. I played soprano sax at
          Message 4 of 18 , Nov 29, 2005
            Mike,

            I was there, both nights, total of 4 sets. There were 27 instruments set up on the stage. The music both nights was phenomenal. 

            I played soprano sax at the time, but I started assembling my own arsenal of instruments after that display.

            David Wight

            On Nov 29, 2005, at 6:09 PM, Michael Fitzgerald wrote:


            This review is of the first of two nights (April 29 & 30, 1977),
            according to NYT 4/24/77 p.D40. No recording to my knowledge.

            NYT 5/1/77 p.70
            =================================

            Three Reed Players Improvise at Kitchen

            Roscoe Mitchell, Joseph Jarman, and Anthony Braxton, who performed
            music for varying combinations of saxophones, clarinets, and flutes
            at the Kitchen Friday, were the most promising young reed players of
            the Chicago jazz avant-garde 10 years ago. Today they are practically
            elder statesmen. A school of improvisational reed playing has sprung
            up behind them, and this is not surprising, for they have opened jazz
            to an unprecedented palette of instrumental sounds while
            demonstrating that spontaneity and a thoughtful approach to
            structural organization need not be incompatible.

            Between them, the three musicians played more than 20 woodwinds
            during their concert at the Kitchen, but the unusual instrumentation
            was not employed for its shock value. Even a piece for bass and
            contrabass saxophones, composed by Mr. Braxton, avoided cuteness. The
            switching of instruments by individual players took place in an
            orderly fashion; it did not intrude on the flow of the music.

            The trio played pieces by Mr. Mitchell and Mr. Braxton at Friday's
            concert, with Mr. Jarman's compositions set for another day, and the
            bravura contrapuntal passages, silences, variations in dynamics and
            timbre, and satisfying resolutions into chords and unisons the two
            writers provided guided the collective improvising without
            unnecessarily circumscribing it.

            Mr. Jarman, who plays a battery of wind, percussion, and stringed
            instruments when performing as a member of the Art Ensemble of
            Chicago and is not often heard soloing at length, turned in several
            captivating statements, especially a breathy tenor saxophone rhapsody
            and some celebratory bass clarinet solos.

            Mr. Mitchell, who never plays a phrase when a note will do, was
            catapulted into an alto saxophone improvisation of staggering
            vitality and richness by one of Mr. Braxton's composed passages. Mr.
            Braxton was particularly effective on his huge contrabass saxophone,
            on alto saxophone, and on his regular and contrabass clarinets.

            - Robert Palmer

            ===========================================

            Mike



            mike at JazzDiscography.com
            http://www.JazzDiscography.com



            SPONSORED LINKS
            Short time Artist Christian music artists
            New music artists


            YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS





          • Michael Fitzgerald
            Braxton was at Storyville in NYC Tuesday-Saturday, November 8-12, 1977. No recording to my knowledge. NYT 11/10/77 p.73 =========================== Jazz:
            Message 5 of 18 , Nov 29, 2005
              Braxton was at Storyville in NYC Tuesday-Saturday, November 8-12,
              1977. No recording to my knowledge.

              NYT 11/10/77 p.73

              ===========================

              Jazz: Braxton Leads New Band
              By Robert Palmer

              The new Anthony Braxton band performing at Storyville through
              Saturday affords a chance to become acquainted with some important
              new faces and to hear more familiar musicians in a new light. It is a
              thicker, heavier band than those Mr. Braxton has fronted in the past,
              but it is finely balanced in sonorities, personalities, and talents.
              If it stays together it will undoubtedly be the best group Mr. Braxton has led.

              Foremost among the new faces is Ray Anderson, a trombonist whose
              reputation has preceded him to New York. Like George Lewis, his
              predecessor in Mr. Braxton's trombone chair. Mr. Anderson has a
              fluency and range on the instrument that would have seemed impossible
              a few years ago. But his sound is higher and more pinched than Mr.
              Lewis's, like a trombone version of John Coltrane's tenor saxophone
              sound, and he has ideas of his own.

              The other new faces are Thurman Barker, a deft and attentive drummer
              who has been a mainstay of Chicago's jazz scene for some years but is
              rarely heard in the East, and Brian Smith, a bassist with exemplary
              intonation and a dark, booming sound.

              Leroy Jenkins, the violinist from the recently disbanded and sorely
              missed Revolutionary Ensemble, has rejoined Mr. Braxton, his cohort
              in a groundbreaking trio and quartet of the late 1960s. Mr. Jenkins
              is the most resourceful and dependably inspiring violinist of the
              modern period, and he is also a canny group improviser, at home in
              both the wispiest and densest situations. When Mr. Braxton switches
              from saxophone to saxophone and clarinet to clarinet, Mr. Anderson
              triples on trombone, tuba, and wood flute, and Mr. Smith plays some
              cello, the constancy of Mr. Jenkins's violin sound serves as a kind
              of beacon around which the group's shifting colors seem to revolve.


              ===========================================

              BTW, this "new band" announcement followed closely on the heels of
              another "new band" announcement - a quartet with AB, Ray Anderson,
              Mark Helias, and Thurman Barker. There was a long article "Anthony
              Braxton Breaks Up His Quartet of a Decade" (?!? - as I think we all
              know now, Holland and Altschul only went back to 1970) in the Oakland
              Tribune 10/3/77. The quartet played at Zellerbach Auditorium,
              Berkeley, CA on 10/1/77.

              Mike



              mike at JazzDiscography.com
              http://www.JazzDiscography.com
            • Michael Fitzgerald
              ... You forgot to add that you have this preserved not only in your memory, but also in audio, video, still photos, and pencil sketches! BTW, I gave wrong
              Message 6 of 18 , Nov 29, 2005
                David Wight wrote:
                >I was there, both nights, total of 4 sets. There were 27 instruments
                >set up on the stage. The music both nights was phenomenal.

                You forgot to add that you have this preserved not only in your
                memory, but also in audio, video, still photos, and pencil sketches!

                BTW, I gave wrong citation information regarding the "breaks up
                quartet of a decade" article. It was 9/25/77 p.13E and 15E in the
                Oakland Tribune. The 10/3/77 article I mentioned was the Zellerbach
                Auditorium concert review.

                Because I'm too tired to retype these lengthy articles, I have put
                all three of these pages in the Files section of the group website.
                Have a look - they're fascinating.

                Mike



                mike at JazzDiscography.com
                http://www.JazzDiscography.com
              Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.