Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [Anglo_Saxon_Lyres] New member & Jay Witcher Sutton Hoo Lyre

Expand Messages
  • Roger Landes
    Doug - that link for the photos doesn t seem to be working... ... -- Roger Landes rwlandes@taosnet.com Website: http://rogerlandes.com Bouzouki duo CD:
    Message 1 of 16 , Jun 29, 2007
    • 0 Attachment
      Doug - that link for the photos doesn't seem to be working...

      Doug Saball wrote:
      >
      > You can view "cat girl pink's" photos and videos and pictures at:
      >
      > 64 photos uploaded to my Photobucket album at
      > http://photobucket.com/albums/b36/catgirl_pink1/SCAevents/2007-06-
      > 23_HoultonMidsummerGathering








      --
      Roger Landes
      rwlandes@...
      Website: http://rogerlandes.com
      Bouzouki duo CD: http://janissarystomp.com
      ZoukFest World Music Camp, June 8-14th, 2008: http://zoukfest.com
    • Doug Saball
      Roger, I see that the link was wrapped in text mode. http://s16.photobucket.com/albums/b36/catgirl_pink1/SCAevents/2007-06-23_HoultonMidsummerGathering/ If
      Message 2 of 16 , Jul 1, 2007
      • 0 Attachment
        Roger, I see that the link was "wrapped" in text mode.
         
         
        If this does not work go to: http://photobucket.com/ and search for "catgitl_pink1"  This is all her photos.  Then click "SCA events" and click "2007-06-23_HoultonMaineGathering.
         
        I will try to load up the picture of Richard tuning Jay's Lyre outside.  This seems to be the best picture.  The You Tube video is informative and Richard plays the harp and Lyre to compare sounds.
         
        Of interest that I was informed, the Denmark group KRAUKA's lyre player Jens tunes his opposite of what Richard and Jay have.  My thought is that 1) it is tuned similar to the Harp because that is what Jay is most familiar with. Or 2) tuning can be reversed for left or right hand players,  Richard talks a little about hand position and picking in the video.
         
        If these links do not work let me know and I will investigate why.
         
        Doug Saball
        Unity ME
         

        Roger Landes <rwlandes@...> wrote:
        Doug - that link for the photos doesn't seem to be working...

        Doug Saball wrote:
        >
        > You can view "cat girl pink's" photos and videos and pictures at:
        >
        > 64 photos uploaded to my Photobucket album at
        > http://photobucket. com/albums/ b36/catgirl_ pink1/SCAevents/ 2007-06-
        > 23_HoultonMidsummer Gathering

        --
        Roger Landes
        rwlandes@taosnet. com
        Website: http://rogerlandes. com
        Bouzouki duo CD: http://janissarysto mp.com
        ZoukFest World Music Camp, June 8-14th, 2008: http://zoukfest. com



        Building a website is a piece of cake.
        Yahoo! Small Business gives you all the tools to get online.

      • Patrick
        Hi all, Apparently, Jay Witcher is a master harp-maker; I ve seen some of his instruments on the following website: http://home.att.net/~HarpPlayer/Witcher.htm
        Message 3 of 16 , Jul 1, 2007
        • 0 Attachment
          Hi all,

          Apparently, Jay Witcher is a master harp-maker; I've seen some of his
          instruments on the following website:

          http://home.att.net/~HarpPlayer/Witcher.htm

          My wife instantly wanted to have one! Do you know how get in touch
          with Jay via the internet? Does he have a website/email address?

          Best,

          Patrick

          >
          > Roger, I see that the link was "wrapped" in text mode.
          >
          >
          http://s16.photobucket.com/albums/b36/catgirl_pink1/SCAevents/2007-06-23_HoultonMidsummerGathering/
          >
          > If this does not work go to: http://photobucket.com/ and search
          for "catgitl_pink1" This is all her photos. Then click "SCA events"
          and click "2007-06-23_HoultonMaineGathering.
          >
          > I will try to load up the picture of Richard tuning Jay's Lyre
          outside. This seems to be the best picture. The You Tube video is
          informative and Richard plays the harp and Lyre to compare sounds.
          >
          > Of interest that I was informed, the Denmark group KRAUKA's lyre
          player Jens tunes his opposite of what Richard and Jay have. My
          thought is that 1) it is tuned similar to the Harp because that is
          what Jay is most familiar with. Or 2) tuning can be reversed for left
          or right hand players, Richard talks a little about hand position and
          picking in the video.
          >
          > If these links do not work let me know and I will investigate why.
          >
          > Doug Saball
          > Unity ME
          > http://www.myspace.com/dougsaball
          >
          >
          > Roger Landes <rwlandes@...> wrote:
          > Doug - that link for the photos doesn't seem to be working...
          >
          > Doug Saball wrote:
          > >
          > > You can view "cat girl pink's" photos and videos and pictures at:
          > >
          > > 64 photos uploaded to my Photobucket album at
          > > http://photobucket.com/albums/b36/catgirl_pink1/SCAevents/2007-06-
          > > 23_HoultonMidsummerGathering
          >
          > --
          > Roger Landes
          > rwlandes@...
          > Website: http://rogerlandes.com
          > Bouzouki duo CD: http://janissarystomp.com
          > ZoukFest World Music Camp, June 8-14th, 2008: http://zoukfest.com
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > ---------------------------------
          > Building a website is a piece of cake.
          > Yahoo! Small Business gives you all the tools to get online.
          >
        • Doug Saball
          Hi Patrick, Jay is old school type, and he does not have a web page. Most of his harps are sold through retail shops. I am lucky in that the group I am in
          Message 4 of 16 , Jul 1, 2007
          • 0 Attachment
            Hi Patrick,
             
            Jay is "old school" type, and he does not have a web page.  Most of his harps are sold through retail shops.  I am lucky in that the group I am in "Maine Vikings" (living history) help to maintain his property and Longhouse.
             
            Jay’s harps are all over the World in many orchestras.  Richard who came to the event is a harpist for the NY Philharmonic Orchestra and has known Jay for over 20 years.  I uploaded a picture of Richard tuning Jay's Sutton Hoo Lyre to the group photos today.
             
            This Lyre was made by special order through the archeological specifications of the Sutton Hoo dig report, a five volume document at $100 per volume.  Jay told me that he plans on changing the building method for my Lyre - but it will still be under the specifications of the Sutton Hoo.
             
            He recently did a lap harp by special order ( Canada ) and the person backed out so he is trying to sell it ($1,500, I think???)..  I think it is possible to find his telephone number through the White Pages.  He lives in Houlton , Maine a 5 hour drive from my home.  He moved to Houlton from CA over 35 years ago just so he could have access to the best hard woods for making harps.
             
            One of the lap harps he made that was at the event, but not for sale sustained a note for over a minute after being plucked!
             
            Although I have made instruments in the past (hammered and mountain dulcimers), my thought was that it would be worth the extra money to have one made by Jay.  As I posted before I have a kit from the same person who made Ulf's (picture in group files).
             
            I know that Jay has a few Harps on order So I do not expect my lyre until next spring.  Like it is said “good things come to those who waite…”
             
            Fornbern
             
            Doug Saball
            Unity ME
             

            Patrick <kadwall@...> wrote:
            Hi all,

            Apparently, Jay Witcher is a master harp-maker; I've seen some of his
            instruments on the following website:

            http://home. att.net/~ HarpPlayer/ Witcher.htm

            My wife instantly wanted to have one! Do you know how get in touch
            with Jay via the internet? Does he have a website/email address?

            Best,

            Patrick

            >
            > Roger, I see that the link was "wrapped" in text mode.
            >
            >
            http://s16.photobuc ket.com/albums/ b36/catgirl_ pink1/SCAevents/ 2007-06-23_ HoultonMidsummer Gathering/
            >
            > If this does not work go to: http://photobucket. com/ and search
            for "catgitl_pink1" This is all her photos. Then click "SCA events"
            and click "2007-06-23_ HoultonMaineGath ering.
            >
            > I will try to load up the picture of Richard tuning Jay's Lyre
            outside. This seems to be the best picture. The You Tube video is
            informative and Richard plays the harp and Lyre to compare sounds.
            >
            > Of interest that I was informed, the Denmark group KRAUKA's lyre
            player Jens tunes his opposite of what Richard and Jay have. My
            thought is that 1) it is tuned similar to the Harp because that is
            what Jay is most familiar with. Or 2) tuning can be reversed for left
            or right hand players, Richard talks a little about hand position and
            picking in the video.
            >
            > If these links do not work let me know and I will investigate why.
            >
            > Doug Saball
            > Unity ME
            > http://www.myspace. com/dougsaball
            >
            >
            > Roger Landes <rwlandes@.. .> wrote:
            > Doug - that link for the photos doesn't seem to be working...
            >
            > Doug Saball wrote:
            > >
            > > You can view "cat girl pink's" photos and videos and pictures at:
            > >
            > > 64 photos uploaded to my Photobucket album at
            > > http://photobucket. com/albums/ b36/catgirl_ pink1/SCAevents/ 2007-06-
            > > 23_HoultonMidsummer Gathering
            >
            > --
            > Roger Landes
            > rwlandes@...
            > Website: http://rogerlandes. com
            > Bouzouki duo CD: http://janissarysto mp.com
            > ZoukFest World Music Camp, June 8-14th, 2008: http://zoukfest. com
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > ------------ --------- --------- ---
            > Building a website is a piece of cake.
            > Yahoo! Small Business gives you all the tools to get online.
            >



            Get the free Yahoo! toolbar and rest assured with the added security of spyware protection.

          • David Friedman
            I ve made several copies of the bridge of the Trossingen lyre, to size. Recently I tried putting one of them on the old replica of the Trossingen that I made
            Message 5 of 16 , Jul 3, 2007
            • 0 Attachment
              I've made several copies of the bridge of the Trossingen lyre, to
              size. Recently I tried putting one of them on the old replica of the
              Trossingen that I made before the big article was published, which is
              about the right size although wrong in many details. Centered over
              the sound chamber, it was substantially too narrow for the strings.
              It was still too narrow if I used only five strings, which is closer
              to correct, since I had my tuning pegs a bit too far apart--five
              strings on mine give about the separation at the yoke end of all six
              on the real intrument.

              My replica has a tail piece which the strings fasten to. This result
              suggests that either:

              1. On the real instrument, the tail piece was very narrow.

              2. On the real instrument, there was no tail piece; the strings
              fastened around the projection at the end, as in a replica of one of
              the destroyed lyres I have seen (how good the basis for it is I don't
              know).

              3. The bridge actually functioned to pull the strings towards the
              center, so that the string did not make a straight line from
              tailpiece to peg.

              Has anyone else done calculations or experiments on the question? The
              Trossingen apparently doesn't have a surviving tail piece, which
              might suggest possibility 2 above.
              --
              David Friedman
              www.daviddfriedman.com
              daviddfriedman.blogspot.com/
            • Tim Caldwell
              ... wrote: Hi David, Barbara Theune-Großkopf seemed to think that there s still a chance a tailpiece might be found. But it seems to me that a tailpiece is
              Message 6 of 16 , Jul 4, 2007
              • 0 Attachment
                --- In Anglo_Saxon_Lyres@yahoogroups.com, David Friedman <ddfr@...>
                wrote:


                Hi David,

                Barbara Theune-Großkopf seemed to think that there's still a chance
                a tailpiece might be found. But it seems to me that a tailpiece is
                just a convenience that you could, if necessary, do without. As far
                as I can see, it would just mean that when you change a string you'd
                just have to loosen some or all of the other strings so that they
                could be temporarily removed from the end peg to get at the one you
                want to replace.

                BTW, can you make any sense of what she says in the report about why
                the bridge has a seventh notch in it? My translation isn't
                fantastic, and I really don't understand what she means.

                Cheers,
                Tim






                > I've made several copies of the bridge of the Trossingen lyre, to
                > size. Recently I tried putting one of them on the old replica of
                the
                > Trossingen that I made before the big article was published, which
                is
                > about the right size although wrong in many details. Centered over
                > the sound chamber, it was substantially too narrow for the
                strings.
                > It was still too narrow if I used only five strings, which is
                closer
                > to correct, since I had my tuning pegs a bit too far apart--five
                > strings on mine give about the separation at the yoke end of all
                six
                > on the real intrument.
                >
                > My replica has a tail piece which the strings fasten to. This
                result
                > suggests that either:
                >
                > 1. On the real instrument, the tail piece was very narrow.
                >
                > 2. On the real instrument, there was no tail piece; the strings
                > fastened around the projection at the end, as in a replica of one
                of
                > the destroyed lyres I have seen (how good the basis for it is I
                don't
                > know).
                >
                > 3. The bridge actually functioned to pull the strings towards the
                > center, so that the string did not make a straight line from
                > tailpiece to peg.
                >
                > Has anyone else done calculations or experiments on the question?
                The
                > Trossingen apparently doesn't have a surviving tail piece, which
                > might suggest possibility 2 above.
                > --
                > David Friedman
                > www.daviddfriedman.com
                > daviddfriedman.blogspot.com/
                >
              • LM
                Benjamin Bagby s lyre (by Rainer Thurau) has a very narrow bridge, which tends to pinch the strings together. This doesn t seem to affect the playability
                Message 7 of 16 , Jul 4, 2007
                • 0 Attachment
                  Benjamin Bagby's lyre (by Rainer Thurau) has a very narrow bridge, which tends
                  to pinch the strings together. This doesn't seem to affect the playability much.
                  Ben tends to pluck higher up on the strings where the separation is greater,
                  closer to a harp. There have been a number of bridges recovered from gravesites
                  that seem to tend towards narrower than wider, if memory serves me correctly. Of
                  greater concern to me would be the depth of the grooves through which each
                  string runs, and the height of the bridge. I have been in the habit of matching
                  the spacing on the bridge with the spacing on the tailpiece- around 1/4" or
                  about .5 cm.

                  I'm more concerned with other issues. The bridge needs to be as light as
                  possible without sacrificing structural integrity. I've found it makes a
                  difference in how I line up the grain in the tailpiece. If the grain lies
                  perpendicular to the strings, it may ( and has) split and broken on me. (This
                  was on a Gunnar lyre with 8 strings and much higher tension.) So I always lay
                  out the tailpiece so that the grain runs in the same direction as the strings.
                  I also have had issues with tailpiece gut, which tends to stretch too much.


                  David Friedman wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  > I've made several copies of the bridge of the Trossingen lyre, to
                  > size. Recently I tried putting one of them on the old replica of the
                  > Trossingen that I made before the big article was published, which is
                  > about the right size although wrong in many details. Centered over
                  > the sound chamber, it was substantially too narrow for the strings.
                  > It was still too narrow if I used only five strings, which is closer
                  > to correct, since I had my tuning pegs a bit too far apart--five
                  > strings on mine give about the separation at the yoke end of all six
                  > on the real intrument.
                  >
                  > My replica has a tail piece which the strings fasten to. This result
                  > suggests that either:
                  >
                  > 1. On the real instrument, the tail piece was very narrow.
                  >
                  > 2. On the real instrument, there was no tail piece; the strings
                  > fastened around the projection at the end, as in a replica of one of
                  > the destroyed lyres I have seen (how good the basis for it is I don't
                  > know).
                  >
                  > 3. The bridge actually functioned to pull the strings towards the
                  > center, so that the string did not make a straight line from
                  > tailpiece to peg.
                  >
                  > Has anyone else done calculations or experiments on the question? The
                  > Trossingen apparently doesn't have a surviving tail piece, which
                  > might suggest possibility 2 above.
                  > --
                  > David Friedman
                  > www.daviddfriedman.com
                  > daviddfriedman.blogspot.com/
                  >
                  >
                • Ken Hulme
                  maybe it s because the other instruments I make have steel strings, but I always cut out a wooden bridge such that the grain is running across the length of
                  Message 8 of 16 , Jul 4, 2007
                  • 0 Attachment
                    maybe it's because the other instruments I make have steel strings, but I
                    always cut out a wooden bridge such that the grain is running across the
                    length of the bride, at right angles to the strings - thus the strings press
                    down into the side of the grain not along the grain... Or maybe i read
                    Larry's description wrong...

                    --KenH


                    >From: LM <lavrans@...>

                    >...The bridge needs to be as light as
                    >possible without sacrificing structural integrity. I've found it makes a
                    >difference in how I line up the grain in the tailpiece. If the grain lies
                    >perpendicular to the strings, it may ( and has) split and broken on me.
                    >(This
                    >was on a Gunnar lyre with 8 strings and much higher tension.) So I always
                    >lay
                    >out the tailpiece so that the grain runs in the same direction as the
                    >strings.

                    _________________________________________________________________
                    http://im.live.com/messenger/im/home/?source=hmtextlinkjuly07
                  • grvsmith
                    Do any of you have a link on where to get the report? I speak German, and my wife is German, we d be MORE than happy to help if we are able. And I d LOVE to
                    Message 9 of 16 , Jul 4, 2007
                    • 0 Attachment

                      Do any of you have a link on where to get the report?

                      I speak German, and my wife is German, we'd be MORE than happy to help if we are able.

                      And I'd LOVE to be able to have a GERMAN Lyre someday!

                      Frideger

                      ----- Original Message -----
                      From: "Tim Caldwell"
                      To: Anglo_Saxon_Lyres@yahoogroups.com
                      Subject: [Anglo_Saxon_Lyres] Re: Trossingen Bridge Puzzle
                      Date: Wed, 04 Jul 2007 08:28:46 -0000


                      > --- In Anglo_Saxon_Lyres@yahoogroups.com, David Friedman
                      > wrote:
                      >
                      >
                      > Hi David,
                      >
                      > Barbara Theune-Großkopf seemed to think that there's still
                      > a chance a tailpiece might be found. But it seems to me
                      > that a tailpiece is just a convenience that you could, if
                      > necessary, do without. As far as I can see, it would just
                      > mean that when you change a string you'd just have to
                      > loosen some or all of the other strings so that they
                      > could be temporarily removed from the end peg to get at
                      > the one you want to replace.
                      >
                      > BTW, can you make any sense of what she says in the report
                      > about why the bridge has a seventh notch in it? My
                      > translation isn't fantastic, and I really don't
                      > understand what she means.
                      >
                      > Cheers,
                      > Tim
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > > I've made several copies of the bridge of the Trossingen
                      > > lyre, to size. Recently I tried putting one of them on
                      > the old replica of the
                      > > Trossingen that I made before the big article was
                      > published, which is
                      > > about the right size although wrong in many details.
                      > > Centered over the sound chamber, it was substantially
                      > too narrow for the strings.
                      > > It was still too narrow if I used only five strings,
                      > which is closer
                      > > to correct, since I had my tuning pegs a bit too far
                      > > apart--five strings on mine give about the separation
                      > at the yoke end of all six
                      > > on the real intrument.
                      > >
                      > > My replica has a tail piece which the strings fasten to.
                      > This result
                      > > suggests that either:
                      > >
                      > > 1. On the real instrument, the tail piece was very
                      > > narrow.
                      > > 2. On the real instrument, there was no tail piece; the
                      > > strings fastened around the projection at the end, as
                      > in a replica of one of
                      > > the destroyed lyres I have seen (how good the basis for
                      > it is I don't
                      > > know).
                      > >
                      > > 3. The bridge actually functioned to pull the strings
                      > > towards the center, so that the string did not make a
                      > > straight line from tailpiece to peg.
                      > >
                      > > Has anyone else done calculations or experiments on the
                      > question? The
                      > > Trossingen apparently doesn't have a surviving tail
                      > > piece, which might suggest possibility 2 above.
                      > > --
                      > > David Friedman
                      > > www.daviddfriedman.com
                      > > daviddfriedman.blogspot.com/
                      > >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                    • LM
                      What I meant was that I usually try to get the grain on the tailpiece in the same direction as the pull of the strings. I didn t clearly say so, but in fact I
                      Message 10 of 16 , Jul 4, 2007
                      • 0 Attachment
                        What I meant was that I usually try to get the grain on the tailpiece in the
                        same direction as the pull of the strings. I didn't clearly say so, but in fact
                        I tend to do the bridge the same way you do. After I have cut out the upper
                        opening, I have some pieces of 1/2" wood to use for bridges and tailpieces.


                        Larry

                        Ken Hulme wrote:

                        >
                        >
                        > maybe it's because the other instruments I make have steel strings, but I
                        > always cut out a wooden bridge such that the grain is running across the
                        > length of the bride, at right angles to the strings - thus the strings
                        > press
                        > down into the side of the grain not along the grain... Or maybe i read
                        > Larry's description wrong...
                        >
                        > --KenH
                        >
                        > >From: LM <lavrans@... <mailto:lavrans%40comcast.net>>
                        >
                        > >...The bridge needs to be as light as
                        > >possible without sacrificing structural integrity. I've found it makes a
                        > >difference in how I line up the grain in the tailpiece. If the grain lies
                        > >perpendicular to the strings, it may ( and has) split and broken on me.
                        > >(This
                        > >was on a Gunnar lyre with 8 strings and much higher tension.) So I always
                        > >lay
                        > >out the tailpiece so that the grain runs in the same direction as the
                        > >strings.
                        >
                        > __________________________________________________________
                        > http://im.live.com/messenger/im/home/?source=hmtextlinkjuly07
                        > <http://im.live.com/messenger/im/home/?source=hmtextlinkjuly07>
                        >
                        >
                      • David Friedman
                        LM writes: ... I ve generally done it that way as well. ... I ve used both rawhide and silver wire for attaching tailpieces to end pegs. The silver wire has
                        Message 11 of 16 , Jul 4, 2007
                        • 0 Attachment
                          LM writes:

                          ...

                          >I'm more concerned with other issues. The bridge needs to be as light as
                          >possible without sacrificing structural integrity. I've found it makes a
                          >difference in how I line up the grain in the tailpiece. If the grain lies
                          >perpendicular to the strings, it may ( and has) split and broken on me. (This
                          >was on a Gunnar lyre with 8 strings and much higher tension.) So I always lay
                          >out the tailpiece so that the grain runs in the same direction as the strings.

                          I've generally done it that way as well.

                          >I also have had issues with tailpiece gut, which tends to stretch too much.

                          I've used both rawhide and silver wire for attaching tailpieces to
                          end pegs. The silver wire has some tendency to split the tailpiece if
                          you aren't careful. It looks very classy, but I don't suppose it's
                          very likely to be right, since if they did use it some would
                          presumably have survived.

                          Do we have any actual information on how they attached the tailpieces?

                          --
                          David Friedman
                          www.daviddfriedman.com
                          daviddfriedman.blogspot.com/
                        • David Friedman
                          ... I think it s pretty clear in the pictures of the bridge of the Trossingen lyre that the grain is running horizontally. I m pasting the picture into this
                          Message 12 of 16 , Jul 4, 2007
                          • 0 Attachment
                            Re: [Anglo_Saxon_Lyres] Trossingen Bridge Puzzle
                            What I meant was that I usually try to get the grain on the tailpiece in the
                            same direction as the pull of the strings. I didn't clearly say so, but in fact
                            I tend to do the bridge the same way you do. After I have cut out the upper
                            opening, I have some pieces of 1/2" wood to use for bridges and tailpieces.

                            I think it's pretty clear in the pictures of the bridge of the Trossingen lyre that the grain is running horizontally. I'm pasting the picture into this email.
                            -- 
                            
                            David Friedman
                            www.daviddfriedman.com
                            daviddfriedman.blogspot.com/
                          • David Friedman
                            My university s library got a photocopy of it from the Stanford library. I scanned and OCR d the relevant parts it to rtf, and would be happy to email that to
                            Message 13 of 16 , Jul 4, 2007
                            • 0 Attachment
                              My university's library got a photocopy of it from the Stanford
                              library. I scanned and OCR'd the relevant parts it to rtf, and would
                              be happy to email that to you, if you want.

                              >Do any of you have a link on where to get the report?
                              >
                              >I speak German, and my wife is German, we'd be MORE than happy to
                              >help if we are able.
                              >
                              >And I'd LOVE to be able to have a GERMAN Lyre someday!
                              >
                              Frideger

                              Where are you located?

                              --
                              David Friedman
                              www.daviddfriedman.com
                              daviddfriedman.blogspot.com/
                            • grvsmith
                              That would be sweet. I live in Rock Springs, Wyoming....just about as far away as you can get from pre 8th Century Europe. Frideger ... From: David Friedman
                              Message 14 of 16 , Jul 4, 2007
                              • 0 Attachment

                                That would be sweet.

                                I live in Rock Springs, Wyoming....just about as far away as you can get from pre 8th Century Europe.

                                Frideger

                                ----- Original Message -----
                                From: David Friedman
                                To: Anglo_Saxon_Lyres@yahoogroups.com
                                Subject: Re: [Anglo_Saxon_Lyres] Re: Trossingen Bridge Puzzle
                                Date: Wed, 4 Jul 2007 13:16:33 -0700


                                > My university's library got a photocopy of it from the
                                > Stanford library. I scanned and OCR'd the relevant parts
                                > it to rtf, and would be happy to email that to you, if
                                > you want.
                                >
                                > >Do any of you have a link on where to get the report?
                                > >
                                > >I speak German, and my wife is German, we'd be MORE than
                                > happy to >help if we are able.
                                > >
                                > >And I'd LOVE to be able to have a GERMAN Lyre someday!
                                > >
                                > Frideger
                                >
                                > Where are you located?
                                >
                                > --
                                > David Friedman
                                > www.daviddfriedman.com
                                > daviddfriedman.blogspot.com/
                                >

                                FM/MAJ Gen Es'mith/Blue 1-2/Wing XXI/MC80B Redemption  SS/BSx2/PCx5/ISMx5/MoI-BC/IS-4BW-1SW/MoC-2BoC-4SoC-8GoC-30PoC-4DoC/CoLx3/CoB/LoA/OV-8E
                                [DCRN] {IWATS-M/1/2-SM/1/2-TM/1-TT-XTT}

                              • Tim Caldwell
                                ... wrote: Hi David, ... Unfortunately no tailpieces are known to have survived, so we don t even know what form they took or even if they were used, let alone
                                Message 15 of 16 , Jul 5, 2007
                                • 0 Attachment
                                  --- In Anglo_Saxon_Lyres@yahoogroups.com, David Friedman <ddfr@...>
                                  wrote:


                                  Hi David,


                                  > Do we have any actual information on how they attached the tailpieces?


                                  Unfortunately no tailpieces are known to have survived, so we don't
                                  even know what form they took or even if they were used, let alone how
                                  they were attached to the end peg. I read somewhere that traces of one
                                  may have been found with the Prittlewell remains, but we'll just have
                                  to wait until the report is published.

                                  Cheers,
                                  Tim



                                  > David Friedman
                                  > www.daviddfriedman.com
                                  > daviddfriedman.blogspot.com/
                                  >
                                Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.