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Re: [Anglo_Saxon_Lyres] Re: Bridge questions

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  • Charles Anderson
    Interesting. You can change the tonal qualities of bronze, by adjusting the percentage of tin (Sn). If you chose 80/20 (bell metal) instead of using 90/10
    Message 1 of 10 , May 4, 2013
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      Interesting.

      You can change the tonal qualities of bronze, by adjusting the percentage of tin (Sn).

      If you chose 80/20 (bell metal) instead of using 90/10 (bronze), you would get more resonance.


      Regards Charles from Oz


      On 05/05/2013 08:26, Paul Butler wrote:
      Yes.  Heavier will dull sound a little bit.  The best are hard but light - which is why things like Baltic amber (very light and very hard) or bone or plastic work very well, while iron, while very hard, or very heavy hardwoods like ironwood, ebony, or the like, are not a effective.  The idea is that the energy of the vibrating string is being transmitted to the soundboard via the bridge.  If the material is very hard, it transmits that vibration much better than if it is soft and absorbs it.  However, if it heavy, it takes more energy to get it vibrating, and uses up some of that energy in its own mass rather than transmitting it to the soundboard.  Sometimes you'll see in modern instruments (like guitars) hybrid materials, with a bone or ebony thin bridge (to capture the vibration well) on top of a maple or other light hardwood main bridge (to reduce the overall mass).  It's unlikely that the Anglo-Saxons made bridges that way, but they would probably have chosen hard and light over hard and heavy for better sound.

      Paul Butler

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