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Trip to see Bagby tell Beowulf

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  • Kazimierz Verkmastare
    Our plans for this past weekend got sidetracked several weeks ago when we found out that Benjamin Bagby would be performing Beowulf in Kansas City (just a 4
    Message 1 of 23 , Mar 1, 2009
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      Our plans for this past weekend got sidetracked several weeks ago when we found out that Benjamin Bagby would be performing Beowulf in Kansas City (just a 4 hour drive away).  I promptly purchased tickets for myself and my girls, and on the suggestion of this list, contacted Mr. Bagby's agent to see if I could find out the schedule for any workshops or Q&A sessions he had.  I sent along the website info for our projects, especially the lyres that my girls built.  And pretty much forgot about it.
       
      Imagine my surprise when I got an e-mail from Mr. Bagby himself, inviting us to come up and spend a couple of hours Friday (the day before the performance) just visiting and looking at instruments and talking with him at his hotel.  He found our projects interesting, and had many good things to say about the girls instruments.  We had to make some accomodations in schedule, but how could we say no?
       
      With a couple of projects on the bench already, the girls and I made the executive decision to make room for one more - we would build Mr. Bagby a lyre from our shop, something that would fill a niche that I knew he didn't have an instrument to fill.  So with the templates fresh dusted off for a similar instrument already in progress (Bennet, yes, yours), we began to cut maple and willow and ash and beech, and with the help of Jessie Vallad at JJE Electronics, who custom builds my pickup sets and built and shipped one emegency mail in just one day, we built an electric Trossingen very similar (but improved) from the one on my website.  It was a ridiculous schedule and a tough job to finish on time, but with the three of us working it seemed possible and as we pulled out of the driveway of the school (I took the girls out half a day early, of course, for this) and my wife was driving as I was tuning and stretching Nylgut strings, we knew a successful build.
       
      We arrived about 4 at his hotel, and he came down to greet us in the lobby.  We had an armful of lyres, we were going to get his critiques and hints and tips after all, and people were stopping us in the lobby and asking about the instruments and the music, and we finally decided to return to his room for a little more focused visit.  I must first say that Benjamin Bagby is one of the nicest, most gracious and down-to-earth people you would ever want to meet.  I encourage my kids to be involved, to ask questions and to be part of what is going on around them, and he was glad to talk to them as if they were any other person, not just kids.  And I had many of my suspicions confirmed - he is still very much a kid at heart, who likes to play with big stories and neat toys, who finds joy in a great epic tale and a shaggy dog story alike, who finds magic in music and sounds and who likes to be involved and active having fun in his environment as well.
       
      About halfway through the visit, he finally picked up the new Trossingen (he had no idea it was made for him) and started playing it.  He spend quite some time with it, and finally commented that he thought it was quite a fine instrument - a comment not make out of just being polite, but because he liked it.  I told him then that it was his, and he tried to refuse, but I had to bring out the unbeatable arguement.  I like to build things, but I have no place to keep this one, so it will have to stay here in your room.  You can either take it or leave it for the next person who stays here.  Since we did actually build it for you, we would appreciate you taking it with you, but either way, it cannot come home with us.
       
      And so he became the new caregiver for this lyre.  And I must say, I enjoyed his playing around with it immenseley - everything I learned to do on a lyre came from watching Michael and Benjamin, and I am not on their level at all.  I know that I build a decent instrument, but it is nice to hear how your work can really sound when played by a pro.
       
      Oh, yeah, he let me play the Oberflacht that he uses, the one built by Thurau.  I was really something, and I stumbled about on it as best I could, and I see why he likes it. It is a fine instrument and modified to provide a bigger sound (it is a surprisingly large lyre, wide and tall, with a bigger soundbox than anything I have ever built.  He refers to it as his 'turbo-lyre'.)
       
      And then a quick there-and-back trip on Saturday from Kansas City to Saint Louis and back, and we were at the concert hall (a gothic cathedral hall) at 7:30 pm and we got front-row center seats, dressed in our viking and germanic clothing (the St. Louis trip was our SCA Kingdom 25th anniversary event, and we didn't have time to change).  And we got to sit there in front of the virtual campfire, listening to a new friend do an awesome job of telling a great story, both daughters snuggled up to me and engrossed in the story, imaginations running full speed.  Didn't stick around for the Q&A after the show - didn't need to.  We had made a new friend, we were able to thank him for his efforts in what we found a most appropriate way, with the gift of a Lyre, and we had a once-in-a-lifetime experience.  Bravo to Mr. Bagby, I couldn't come up with a better combination of skill, graciousness, and positive attitude and friendliness if I tried.  And we are all glad he is a storyteller, even with the cost and travel hassle and everything else, it was SO much better than just another evening of TV shows or movies or computer games, and we would do it every time given the chance.
       
      Because of unbreakable committments starting at 9:30 this morning, we drove back to Arkansas through the (surprise!) snow and ice after the show, arriving home about 4:30 AM, bone tired but without a regret.
       
      And I take this break to tell this story, and now to return to the shop to continue on the two projects still sitting on the bench, both close to completion, and both the focus of some renewed enthusiasm and a lighter spirit by the three craftsmen working on them.
       
      If Bagby performs anywhere within travel distance of anyone on this list, I can not recommend enough that you go see him, and if you can, find a way to say hi in person.  It is very much worth it.
       
      Chris 
       
    • LM
      Your report on Benjamin and his generosity of spirit reflects my own experiences. After seeing him do Beowulf for the first time about ten years ago, I decided
      Message 2 of 23 , Mar 1, 2009
      • 0 Attachment
        Your report on Benjamin and his generosity of spirit reflects my own experiences. After seeing him do Beowulf for the first time about ten years ago, I decided to explore the possibility of making lyres myself.  I got his address in Köln, wrote to him and got a very nice letter back.  I've since had several occasions to speak with him on his visits to Boston and got his unofficial approval of several of my lyres.

        In behalf of all of us who have been inspired by him and his work, I want to thank you for your generosity in making a gift to him of your excellent instrument. It is, in a way, a kind of thank you from all of us, if you don't mind my putting it that way.

        Larry M.

        On Sun, Mar 1, 2009 at 7:36 PM, Kazimierz Verkmastare <kaz@...> wrote:

        Our plans for this past weekend got sidetracked several weeks ago when we found out that Benjamin Bagby would be performing Beowulf in Kansas City (just a 4 hour drive away).  I promptly purchased tickets for myself and my girls, and on the suggestion of this list, contacted Mr. Bagby's agent to see if I could find out the schedule for any workshops or Q&A sessions he had.  I sent along the website info for our projects, especially the lyres that my girls built.  And pretty much forgot about it.
         
        Imagine my surprise when I got an e-mail from Mr. Bagby himself, inviting us to come up and spend a couple of hours Friday (the day before the performance) just visiting and looking at instruments and talking with him at his hotel.  He found our projects interesting, and had many good things to say about the girls instruments.  We had to make some accomodations in schedule, but how could we say no?
         
        With a couple of projects on the bench already, the girls and I made the executive decision to make room for one more - we would build Mr. Bagby a lyre from our shop, something that would fill a niche that I knew he didn't have an instrument to fill.  So with the templates fresh dusted off for a similar instrument already in progress (Bennet, yes, yours), we began to cut maple and willow and ash and beech, and with the help of Jessie Vallad at JJE Electronics, who custom builds my pickup sets and built and shipped one emegency mail in just one day, we built an electric Trossingen very similar (but improved) from the one on my website.  It was a ridiculous schedule and a tough job to finish on time, but with the three of us working it seemed possible and as we pulled out of the driveway of the school (I took the girls out half a day early, of course, for this) and my wife was driving as I was tuning and stretching Nylgut strings, we knew a successful build.
         
        We arrived about 4 at his hotel, and he came down to greet us in the lobby.  We had an armful of lyres, we were going to get his critiques and hints and tips after all, and people were stopping us in the lobby and asking about the instruments and the music, and we finally decided to return to his room for a little more focused visit.  I must first say that Benjamin Bagby is one of the nicest, most gracious and down-to-earth people you would ever want to meet.  I encourage my kids to be involved, to ask questions and to be part of what is going on around them, and he was glad to talk to them as if they were any other person, not just kids.  And I had many of my suspicions confirmed - he is still very much a kid at heart, who likes to play with big stories and neat toys, who finds joy in a great epic tale and a shaggy dog story alike, who finds magic in music and sounds and who likes to be involved and active having fun in his environment as well.
         
        About halfway through the visit, he finally picked up the new Trossingen (he had no idea it was made for him) and started playing it.  He spend quite some time with it, and finally commented that he thought it was quite a fine instrument - a comment not make out of just being polite, but because he liked it.  I told him then that it was his, and he tried to refuse, but I had to bring out the unbeatable arguement.  I like to build things, but I have no place to keep this one, so it will have to stay here in your room.  You can either take it or leave it for the next person who stays here.  Since we did actually build it for you, we would appreciate you taking it with you, but either way, it cannot come home with us.
         
        And so he became the new caregiver for this lyre.  And I must say, I enjoyed his playing around with it immenseley - everything I learned to do on a lyre came from watching Michael and Benjamin, and I am not on their level at all.  I know that I build a decent instrument, but it is nice to hear how your work can really sound when played by a pro.
         
        Oh, yeah, he let me play the Oberflacht that he uses, the one built by Thurau.  I was really something, and I stumbled about on it as best I could, and I see why he likes it. It is a fine instrument and modified to provide a bigger sound (it is a surprisingly large lyre, wide and tall, with a bigger soundbox than anything I have ever built.  He refers to it as his 'turbo-lyre'.)
         
        And then a quick there-and-back trip on Saturday from Kansas City to Saint Louis and back, and we were at the concert hall (a gothic cathedral hall) at 7:30 pm and we got front-row center seats, dressed in our viking and germanic clothing (the St. Louis trip was our SCA Kingdom 25th anniversary event, and we didn't have time to change).  And we got to sit there in front of the virtual campfire, listening to a new friend do an awesome job of telling a great story, both daughters snuggled up to me and engrossed in the story, imaginations running full speed.  Didn't stick around for the Q&A after the show - didn't need to.  We had made a new friend, we were able to thank him for his efforts in what we found a most appropriate way, with the gift of a Lyre, and we had a once-in-a-lifetime experience.  Bravo to Mr. Bagby, I couldn't come up with a better combination of skill, graciousness, and positive attitude and friendliness if I tried.  And we are all glad he is a storyteller, even with the cost and travel hassle and everything else, it was SO much better than just another evening of TV shows or movies or computer games, and we would do it every time given the chance.
         
        Because of unbreakable committments starting at 9:30 this morning, we drove back to Arkansas through the (surprise!) snow and ice after the show, arriving home about 4:30 AM, bone tired but without a regret.
         
        And I take this break to tell this story, and now to return to the shop to continue on the two projects still sitting on the bench, both close to completion, and both the focus of some renewed enthusiasm and a lighter spirit by the three craftsmen working on them.
         
        If Bagby performs anywhere within travel distance of anyone on this list, I can not recommend enough that you go see him, and if you can, find a way to say hi in person.  It is very much worth it.
         
        Chris 
         

      • Kazimierz Verkmastare
        It is OK, occasionally, to realize that just cash on the ledger sheets, while enough to get by on, is really underpayment, and that providing a little bit
        Message 3 of 23 , Mar 1, 2009
        • 0 Attachment
          It is OK, occasionally, to realize that just cash on the ledger sheets, while enough to get by on, is really underpayment, and that providing a little bit more, something that has appropriate meaning, isn't being generous, it is being fair and paying the appropriate wage for someone who has provided something exceptional.  And I think that is something we can all agree on - most of us are real fans and know that Bagby provides something exceptional - something actually priceless.
           
          I know that most times and most situation limit how much we would like to give inspiring people as compensation - sometimes buying the ticket and the DVD has to be enough.  I just happen to be at a time and in a situation where this was possible, and so it was almost a moral imperative that I do it.  And I gladly add to my wishes for his continued success the voices of all the people he has inspired out there, because I know that if circumstances allow, each and every one of those he has inspired would do something similar.
           
          You are welcome, Larry.  I hope that I remain in a position to occasionally provide similar reward to others who have inspired me and provided me with priceless knowledge and experiences.
           
          Chris
           
           

          *********** REPLY SEPARATOR ***********

          On 3/1/2009 at 8:27 PM LM wrote:

          Your report on Benjamin and his generosity of spirit reflects my own experiences. After seeing him do Beowulf for the first time about ten years ago, I decided to explore the possibility of making lyres myself.  I got his address in Köln, wrote to him and got a very nice letter back.  I've since had several occasions to speak with him on his visits to Boston and got his unofficial approval of several of my lyres.

          In behalf of all of us who have been inspired by him and his work, I want to thank you for your generosity in making a gift to him of your excellent instrument. It is, in a way, a kind of thank you from all of us, if you don't mind my putting it that way.

          Larry M.

          On Sun, Mar 1, 2009 at 7:36 PM, Kazimierz Verkmastare <kaz@...> wrote:

          Our plans for this past weekend got sidetracked several weeks ago when we found out that Benjamin Bagby would be performing Beowulf in Kansas City (just a 4 hour drive away).  I promptly purchased tickets for myself and my girls, and on the suggestion of this list, contacted Mr. Bagby's agent to see if I could find out the schedule for any workshops or Q&A sessions he had.  I sent along the website info for our projects, especially the lyres that my girls built.  And pretty much forgot about it.
           
          Imagine my surprise when I got an e-mail from Mr. Bagby himself, inviting us to come up and spend a couple of hours Friday (the day before the performance)  just visiting and looking at instruments and talking with him at his hotel.  He found our projects interesting, and had many good things to say about the girls instruments.  We had to make some accomodations in schedule, but how could we say no?
           
          With a couple of projects on the bench already, the girls and I made the executive decision to make room for one more - we would build Mr. Bagby a lyre from our shop, something that would fill a niche that I knew he didn't have an instrument to fill.  So with the templates fresh dusted off for a similar instrument already in progress (Bennet, yes, yours), we began to cut maple and willow and ash and beech, and with the help of Jessie Vallad at JJE Electronics, who custom builds my pickup sets and built and shipped one emegency mail in just one day, we built an electric Trossingen very similar (but improved) from the one on my website.  It was a ridiculous schedule and a tough job to finish on time, but with the three of us working it seemed possible and as we pulled out of the driveway of the school (I took the girls out half a day early, of course, for this) and my wife was driving as I was tuning and stretching Nylgut strings, we knew a successful build.
           
          We arrived about 4 at his hotel, and he came down to greet us in the lobby.  We had an armful of lyres, we were going to get his critiques and hints and tips after all, and people were stopping us in the lobby and asking about the instruments and the music, and we finally decided to return to his room for a little more focused visit.  I must first say that Benjamin Bagby is one of the nicest, most gracious and down-to-earth people you would ever want to meet.  I encourage my kids to be involved, to ask questions and to be part of what is going on around them, and he was glad to talk to them as if they were any other person, not just kids.  And I had many of my suspicions confirmed - he is still very much a kid at heart, who likes to play with big stories and neat toys, who finds joy in a great epic tale and a shaggy dog story alike, who finds magic in music and sounds and who likes to be involved and active having fun in his environment as well.
           
          About halfway through the visit, he finally picked up the new Trossingen (he had no idea it was made for him) and started playing it.  He spend quite some time with it, and finally commented that he thought it was quite a fine instrument - a comment not make out of just being polite, but because he liked it.  I told him then that it was his, and he tried to refuse, but I had to bring out the unbeatable arguement.  I like to build things, but I have no place to keep this one, so it will have to stay here in your room.  You can either take it or leave it for the next person who stays here.  Since we did actually build it for you, we would appreciate you taking it with you, but either way, it cannot come home with us.
           
          And so he became the new caregiver for this lyre.  And I must say, I enjoyed his playing around with it immenseley - everything I learned to do on a lyre came from watching Michael and Benjamin, and I am not on their level at all.  I know that I build a decent instrument, but it is nice to hear how your work can really sound when played by a pro.
           
          Oh, yeah, he let me play the Oberflacht that he uses, the one built by Thurau.  I was really something, and I stumbled about on it as best I could, and I see why he likes it. It is a fine instrument and modified to provide a bigger sound (it is a surprisingly large lyre, wide and tall, with a bigger soundbox than anything I have ever built.  He refers to it as his 'turbo-lyre'.)
           
          And then a quick there-and-back trip on Saturday from Kansas City to Saint Louis and back, and we were at the concert hall (a gothic cathedral hall) at 7:30 pm and we got front-row center seats, dressed in our viking and germanic clothing (the St. Louis trip was our SCA Kingdom 25th anniversary event, and we didn't have time to change).  And we got to sit there in front of the virtual campfire, listening to a new friend do an awesome job of telling a great story, both daughters snuggled up to me and engrossed in the story, imaginations running full speed.  Didn't stick around for the Q&A after the show - didn't need to.  We had made a new friend, we were able to thank him for his efforts in what we found a most appropriate way, with the gift of a Lyre, and we had a once-in-a-lifetime experience.  Bravo to Mr. Bagby, I couldn't come up with a better combination of skill, graciousness, and positive attitude and friendliness if I tried.  And we are all glad he is a storyteller, even with the cost and travel hassle and everything else, it was SO much better than just another evening of TV shows or movies or computer games, and we would do it every time given the chance.
           
          Because of unbreakable committments starting at 9:30 this morning, we drove back to Arkansas through the (surprise!) snow and ice after the show, arriving home about 4:30 AM, bone tired but without a regret.
           
          And I take this break to tell this story, and now to return to the shop to continue on the two projects still sitting on the bench, both close to completion, and both the focus of some renewed enthusiasm and a lighter spirit by the three craftsmen working on them.
           
          If Bagby performs anywhere within travel distance of anyone on this list, I can not recommend enough that you go see him, and if you can, find a way to say hi in person.  It is very much worth it.
           
          Chris 
           

        • nnaeve
          Your story moved me to tears. Unfortunately I m too wrapped up in my own Beowulf to comment further...but thanks! Niki ... sheets, while enough to get by on,
          Message 4 of 23 , Mar 1, 2009
          • 0 Attachment
            Your story moved me to tears.

            Unfortunately I'm too wrapped up in my own Beowulf to comment
            further...but thanks!

            Niki



            --- In Anglo_Saxon_Lyres@yahoogroups.com, "Kazimierz Verkmastare"
            <kaz@...> wrote:
            >
            > It is OK, occasionally, to realize that just cash on the ledger
            sheets, while enough to get by on, is really underpayment, and that
            providing a little bit more, something that has appropriate meaning,
            isn't being generous, it is being fair and paying the appropriate wage
            for someone who has provided something exceptional. And I think that
            is something we can all agree on - most of us are real fans and know
            that Bagby provides something exceptional - something actually priceless.
            >
            > I know that most times and most situation limit how much we would
            like to give inspiring people as compensation - sometimes buying the
            ticket and the DVD has to be enough. I just happen to be at a time
            and in a situation where this was possible, and so it was almost a
            moral imperative that I do it. And I gladly add to my wishes for his
            continued success the voices of all the people he has inspired out
            there, because I know that if circumstances allow, each and every one
            of those he has inspired would do something similar.
            >
            > You are welcome, Larry. I hope that I remain in a position to
            occasionally provide similar reward to others who have inspired me and
            provided me with priceless knowledge and experiences.
            >
            > Chris
            >
            >
            >
            > *********** REPLY SEPARATOR ***********
            >
            > On 3/1/2009 at 8:27 PM LM wrote:
            > Your report on Benjamin and his generosity of spirit reflects my own
            experiences. After seeing him do Beowulf for the first time about ten
            years ago, I decided to explore the possibility of making lyres
            myself. I got his address in Köln, wrote to him and got a very nice
            letter back. I've since had several occasions to speak with him on
            his visits to Boston and got his unofficial approval of several of my
            lyres.
            >
            > In behalf of all of us who have been inspired by him and his work, I
            want to thank you for your generosity in making a gift to him of your
            excellent instrument. It is, in a way, a kind of thank you from all of
            us, if you don't mind my putting it that way.
            >
            > Larry M.
            >
            > On Sun, Mar 1, 2009 at 7:36 PM, Kazimierz Verkmastare <kaz@...> wrote:
            >
            > Our plans for this past weekend got sidetracked several weeks ago
            when we found out that Benjamin Bagby would be performing Beowulf in
            Kansas City (just a 4 hour drive away). I promptly purchased tickets
            for myself and my girls, and on the suggestion of this list, contacted
            Mr. Bagby's agent to see if I could find out the schedule for any
            workshops or Q&A sessions he had. I sent along the website info for
            our projects, especially the lyres that my girls built. And pretty
            much forgot about it.
            >
            > Imagine my surprise when I got an e-mail from Mr. Bagby himself,
            inviting us to come up and spend a couple of hours Friday (the day
            before the performance) just visiting and looking at instruments and
            talking with him at his hotel. He found our projects interesting, and
            had many good things to say about the girls instruments. We had to
            make some accomodations in schedule, but how could we say no?
            >
            > With a couple of projects on the bench already, the girls and I made
            the executive decision to make room for one more - we would build Mr.
            Bagby a lyre from our shop, something that would fill a niche that I
            knew he didn't have an instrument to fill. So with the templates
            fresh dusted off for a similar instrument already in progress (Bennet,
            yes, yours), we began to cut maple and willow and ash and beech, and
            with the help of Jessie Vallad at JJE Electronics, who custom builds
            my pickup sets and built and shipped one emegency mail in just one
            day, we built an electric Trossingen very similar (but improved) from
            the one on my website. It was a ridiculous schedule and a tough job
            to finish on time, but with the three of us working it seemed possible
            and as we pulled out of the driveway of the school (I took the girls
            out half a day early, of course, for this) and my wife was driving as
            I was tuning and stretching Nylgut strings, we knew a successful build.
            >
            > We arrived about 4 at his hotel, and he came down to greet us in the
            lobby. We had an armful of lyres, we were going to get his critiques
            and hints and tips after all, and people were stopping us in the lobby
            and asking about the instruments and the music, and we finally decided
            to return to his room for a little more focused visit. I must first
            say that Benjamin Bagby is one of the nicest, most gracious and
            down-to-earth people you would ever want to meet. I encourage my kids
            to be involved, to ask questions and to be part of what is going on
            around them, and he was glad to talk to them as if they were any other
            person, not just kids. And I had many of my suspicions confirmed - he
            is still very much a kid at heart, who likes to play with big stories
            and neat toys, who finds joy in a great epic tale and a shaggy dog
            story alike, who finds magic in music and sounds and who likes to be
            involved and active having fun in his environment as well.
            >
            > About halfway through the visit, he finally picked up the new
            Trossingen (he had no idea it was made for him) and started playing
            it. He spend quite some time with it, and finally commented that he
            thought it was quite a fine instrument - a comment not make out of
            just being polite, but because he liked it. I told him then that it
            was his, and he tried to refuse, but I had to bring out the unbeatable
            arguement. I like to build things, but I have no place to keep this
            one, so it will have to stay here in your room. You can either take
            it or leave it for the next person who stays here. Since we did
            actually build it for you, we would appreciate you taking it with you,
            but either way, it cannot come home with us.
            >
            > And so he became the new caregiver for this lyre. And I must say, I
            enjoyed his playing around with it immenseley - everything I learned
            to do on a lyre came from watching Michael and Benjamin, and I am not
            on their level at all. I know that I build a decent instrument, but
            it is nice to hear how your work can really sound when played by a pro.
            >
            > Oh, yeah, he let me play the Oberflacht that he uses, the one built
            by Thurau. I was really something, and I stumbled about on it as best
            I could, and I see why he likes it. It is a fine instrument and
            modified to provide a bigger sound (it is a surprisingly large lyre,
            wide and tall, with a bigger soundbox than anything I have ever built.
            He refers to it as his 'turbo-lyre'.)
            >
            > And then a quick there-and-back trip on Saturday from Kansas City to
            Saint Louis and back, and we were at the concert hall (a gothic
            cathedral hall) at 7:30 pm and we got front-row center seats, dressed
            in our viking and germanic clothing (the St. Louis trip was our SCA
            Kingdom 25th anniversary event, and we didn't have time to change).
            And we got to sit there in front of the virtual campfire, listening to
            a new friend do an awesome job of telling a great story, both
            daughters snuggled up to me and engrossed in the story, imaginations
            running full speed. Didn't stick around for the Q&A after the show -
            didn't need to. We had made a new friend, we were able to thank him
            for his efforts in what we found a most appropriate way, with the gift
            of a Lyre, and we had a once-in-a-lifetime experience. Bravo to Mr.
            Bagby, I couldn't come up with a better combination of skill,
            graciousness, and positive attitude and friendliness if I tried. And
            we are all glad he is a storyteller, even with the cost and travel
            hassle and everything else, it was SO much better than just another
            evening of TV shows or movies or computer games, and we would do it
            every time given the chance.
            >
            > Because of unbreakable committments starting at 9:30 this morning,
            we drove back to Arkansas through the (surprise!) snow and ice after
            the show, arriving home about 4:30 AM, bone tired but without a regret.
            >
            > And I take this break to tell this story, and now to return to the
            shop to continue on the two projects still sitting on the bench, both
            close to completion, and both the focus of some renewed enthusiasm and
            a lighter spirit by the three craftsmen working on them.
            >
            > If Bagby performs anywhere within travel distance of anyone on this
            list, I can not recommend enough that you go see him, and if you can,
            find a way to say hi in person. It is very much worth it.
            >
            > Chris
            >
          • LM
            BTW: The dvd is available on amazon.com Larry M Beowulf (2006)*Starring:* Benjamin
            Message 5 of 23 , Mar 1, 2009
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              BTW: 

              The dvd is available on amazon.com

              Larry M

              Beowulf (2006)

              Starring: Benjamin Bagby Director: Stellan Olsson Rating:   Format: DVD
              4.8 out of 5 stars See all reviews (25 customer reviews)

              List Price:$29.99
              Price:$26.99




              On Sun, Mar 1, 2009 at 11:07 PM, nnaeve <nnaeve@...> wrote:

              Your story moved me to tears.

              Unfortunately I'm too wrapped up in my own Beowulf to comment
              further...but thanks!

              Niki

              --- In Anglo_Saxon_Lyres@yahoogroups.com, "Kazimierz Verkmastare"


              <kaz@...> wrote:
              >
              > It is OK, occasionally, to realize that just cash on the ledger
              sheets, while enough to get by on, is really underpayment, and that
              providing a little bit more, something that has appropriate meaning,
              isn't being generous, it is being fair and paying the appropriate wage
              for someone who has provided something exceptional. And I think that
              is something we can all agree on - most of us are real fans and know
              that Bagby provides something exceptional - something actually priceless.
              >
              > I know that most times and most situation limit how much we would
              like to give inspiring people as compensation - sometimes buying the
              ticket and the DVD has to be enough. I just happen to be at a time
              and in a situation where this was possible, and so it was almost a
              moral imperative that I do it. And I gladly add to my wishes for his
              continued success the voices of all the people he has inspired out
              there, because I know that if circumstances allow, each and every one
              of those he has inspired would do something similar.
              >
              > You are welcome, Larry. I hope that I remain in a position to
              occasionally provide similar reward to others who have inspired me and
              provided me with priceless knowledge and experiences.
              >
              > Chris
              >
              >
              >
              > *********** REPLY SEPARATOR ***********
              >
              > On 3/1/2009 at 8:27 PM LM wrote:
              > Your report on Benjamin and his generosity of spirit reflects my own
              experiences. After seeing him do Beowulf for the first time about ten
              years ago, I decided to explore the possibility of making lyres
              myself. I got his address in Köln, wrote to him and got a very nice
              letter back. I've since had several occasions to speak with him on
              his visits to Boston and got his unofficial approval of several of my
              lyres.
              >
              > In behalf of all of us who have been inspired by him and his work, I
              want to thank you for your generosity in making a gift to him of your
              excellent instrument. It is, in a way, a kind of thank you from all of
              us, if you don't mind my putting it that way.
              >
              > Larry M.
              >
              > On Sun, Mar 1, 2009 at 7:36 PM, Kazimierz Verkmastare <kaz@...> wrote:
              >
              > Our plans for this past weekend got sidetracked several weeks ago
              when we found out that Benjamin Bagby would be performing Beowulf in
              Kansas City (just a 4 hour drive away). I promptly purchased tickets
              for myself and my girls, and on the suggestion of this list, contacted
              Mr. Bagby's agent to see if I could find out the schedule for any
              workshops or Q&A sessions he had. I sent along the website info for
              our projects, especially the lyres that my girls built. And pretty
              much forgot about it.
              >
              > Imagine my surprise when I got an e-mail from Mr. Bagby himself,
              inviting us to come up and spend a couple of hours Friday (the day
              before the performance) just visiting and looking at instruments and
              talking with him at his hotel. He found our projects interesting, and
              had many good things to say about the girls instruments. We had to
              make some accomodations in schedule, but how could we say no?
              >
              > With a couple of projects on the bench already, the girls and I made
              the executive decision to make room for one more - we would build Mr.
              Bagby a lyre from our shop, something that would fill a niche that I
              knew he didn't have an instrument to fill. So with the templates
              fresh dusted off for a similar instrument already in progress (Bennet,
              yes, yours), we began to cut maple and willow and ash and beech, and
              with the help of Jessie Vallad at JJE Electronics, who custom builds
              my pickup sets and built and shipped one emegency mail in just one
              day, we built an electric Trossingen very similar (but improved) from
              the one on my website. It was a ridiculous schedule and a tough job
              to finish on time, but with the three of us working it seemed possible
              and as we pulled out of the driveway of the school (I took the girls
              out half a day early, of course, for this) and my wife was driving as
              I was tuning and stretching Nylgut strings, we knew a successful build.
              >
              > We arrived about 4 at his hotel, and he came down to greet us in the
              lobby. We had an armful of lyres, we were going to get his critiques
              and hints and tips after all, and people were stopping us in the lobby
              and asking about the instruments and the music, and we finally decided
              to return to his room for a little more focused visit. I must first
              say that Benjamin Bagby is one of the nicest, most gracious and
              down-to-earth people you would ever want to meet. I encourage my kids
              to be involved, to ask questions and to be part of what is going on
              around them, and he was glad to talk to them as if they were any other
              person, not just kids. And I had many of my suspicions confirmed - he
              is still very much a kid at heart, who likes to play with big stories
              and neat toys, who finds joy in a great epic tale and a shaggy dog
              story alike, who finds magic in music and sounds and who likes to be
              involved and active having fun in his environment as well.
              >
              > About halfway through the visit, he finally picked up the new
              Trossingen (he had no idea it was made for him) and started playing
              it. He spend quite some time with it, and finally commented that he
              thought it was quite a fine instrument - a comment not make out of
              just being polite, but because he liked it. I told him then that it
              was his, and he tried to refuse, but I had to bring out the unbeatable
              arguement. I like to build things, but I have no place to keep this
              one, so it will have to stay here in your room. You can either take
              it or leave it for the next person who stays here. Since we did
              actually build it for you, we would appreciate you taking it with you,
              but either way, it cannot come home with us.
              >
              > And so he became the new caregiver for this lyre. And I must say, I
              enjoyed his playing around with it immenseley - everything I learned
              to do on a lyre came from watching Michael and Benjamin, and I am not
              on their level at all. I know that I build a decent instrument, but
              it is nice to hear how your work can really sound when played by a pro.
              >
              > Oh, yeah, he let me play the Oberflacht that he uses, the one built
              by Thurau. I was really something, and I stumbled about on it as best
              I could, and I see why he likes it. It is a fine instrument and
              modified to provide a bigger sound (it is a surprisingly large lyre,
              wide and tall, with a bigger soundbox than anything I have ever built.
              He refers to it as his 'turbo-lyre'.)
              >
              > And then a quick there-and-back trip on Saturday from Kansas City to
              Saint Louis and back, and we were at the concert hall (a gothic
              cathedral hall) at 7:30 pm and we got front-row center seats, dressed
              in our viking and germanic clothing (the St. Louis trip was our SCA
              Kingdom 25th anniversary event, and we didn't have time to change).
              And we got to sit there in front of the virtual campfire, listening to
              a new friend do an awesome job of telling a great story, both
              daughters snuggled up to me and engrossed in the story, imaginations
              running full speed. Didn't stick around for the Q&A after the show -
              didn't need to. We had made a new friend, we were able to thank him
              for his efforts in what we found a most appropriate way, with the gift
              of a Lyre, and we had a once-in-a-lifetime experience. Bravo to Mr.
              Bagby, I couldn't come up with a better combination of skill,
              graciousness, and positive attitude and friendliness if I tried. And
              we are all glad he is a storyteller, even with the cost and travel
              hassle and everything else, it was SO much better than just another
              evening of TV shows or movies or computer games, and we would do it
              every time given the chance.
              >
              > Because of unbreakable committments starting at 9:30 this morning,
              we drove back to Arkansas through the (surprise!) snow and ice after
              the show, arriving home about 4:30 AM, bone tired but without a regret.
              >
              > And I take this break to tell this story, and now to return to the
              shop to continue on the two projects still sitting on the bench, both
              close to completion, and both the focus of some renewed enthusiasm and
              a lighter spirit by the three craftsmen working on them.
              >
              > If Bagby performs anywhere within travel distance of anyone on this
              list, I can not recommend enough that you go see him, and if you can,
              find a way to say hi in person. It is very much worth it.
              >
              > Chris
              >


            • Kazimierz Verkmastare
              I copied it to a thumb drive that I have with me at all times, I watch it regularly - it is the best Beowulf I think I have ever seen. And amazing enough, no
              Message 6 of 23 , Mar 2, 2009
              • 0 Attachment
                I copied it to a thumb drive that I have with me at all times, I watch it regularly - it is the best Beowulf I think I have ever seen.  And amazing enough, no Hollywood CGI, no Angelina Jolie, no special effects, nothing.
                 
                Go figure...
                 
                Chris

                *********** REPLY SEPARATOR ***********

                On 3/1/2009 at 11:09 PM LM wrote:

                BTW: 

                The dvd is available on amazon.com

                Larry M

                Beowulf (2006)

                Starring: Benjamin Bagby Director: Stellan Olsson Rating:   Format: DVD
                 
                25 Reviews
                5 star:92% (23)
                4 star:4% (1)
                3 star:  (0)
                2 star:4% (1)
                1 star:  (0)

                See all 25 customer reviews...
                4.8 out of 5 stars See all reviews (25 customer reviews)

                List Price:$29.99
                Price:$26.99




                On Sun, Mar 1, 2009 at 11:07 PM, nnaeve <nnaeve@yahoo. com> wrote:

                Your story moved me to tears.

                Unfortunately I'm too wrapped up in my own Beowulf to comment
                further...but thanks!

                Niki

                --- In Anglo_Saxon_ Lyres@yahoogroup s.com, "Kazimierz Verkmastare"


                <kaz@...> wrote:
                >
                > It is OK, occasionally, to realize that just cash on the ledger
                sheets, while enough to get by on, is really underpayment, and that
                providing a little bit more, something that has appropriate meaning,
                isn't being generous, it is being fair and paying the appropriate wage
                for someone who has provided something exceptional. And I think that
                is something we can all agree on - most of us are real fans and know
                that Bagby provides something exceptional - something actually priceless.
                >
                > I know that most times and most situation limit how much we would
                like to give inspiring people as compensation - sometimes buying the
                ticket and the DVD has to be enough. I just happen to be at a time
                and in a situation where this was possible, and so it was almost a
                moral imperative that I do it. And I gladly add to my wishes for his
                continued success the voices of all the people he has inspired out
                there, because I know that if circumstances allow, each and every one
                of those he has inspired would do something similar.
                >
                > You are welcome, Larry. I hope that I remain in a position to
                occasionally provide similar reward to others who have inspired me and
                provided me with priceless knowledge and experiences.
                >
                > Chris
                >
                >
                >
                > *********** REPLY SEPARATOR ***********
                >
                > On 3/1/2009 at 8:27 PM LM wrote:
                > Your report on Benjamin and his generosity of spirit reflects my own
                experiences. After seeing him do Beowulf for the first time about ten
                years ago, I decided to explore the possibility of making lyres
                myself. I got his address in Köln, wrote to him and got a very nice
                letter back. I've since had several occasions to speak with him on
                his visits to Boston and got his unofficial approval of several of my
                lyres.
                >
                > In behalf of all of us who have been inspired by him and his work, I
                want to thank you for your generosity in making a gift to him of your
                excellent instrument. It is, in a way, a kind of thank you from all of
                us, if you don't mind my putting it that way.
                >
                > Larry M.
                >
                > On Sun, Mar 1, 2009 at 7:36 PM, Kazimierz Verkmastare <kaz@...> wrote:
                >
                > Our plans for this past weekend got sidetracked several weeks ago
                when we found out that Benjamin Bagby would be performing Beowulf in
                Kansas City (just a 4 hour drive away). I promptly purchased tickets
                for myself and my girls, and on the suggestion of this list, contacted
                Mr. Bagby's agent to see if I could find out the schedule for any
                workshops or Q&A sessions he had. I sent along the website info for
                our projects, especially the lyres that my girls built. And pretty
                much forgot about it.
                >
                > Imagine my surprise when I got an e-mail from Mr. Bagby himself,
                inviting us to come up and spend a couple of hours Friday (the day
                before the performance) just visiting and looking at instruments and
                talking with him at his hotel. He found our projects interesting, and
                had many good things to say about the girls instruments. We had to
                make some accomodations in schedule, but how could we say no?
                >
                > With a couple of projects on the bench already, the girls and I made
                the executive decision to make room for one more - we would build Mr.
                Bagby a lyre from our shop, something that would fill a niche that I
                knew he didn't have an instrument to fill. So with the templates
                fresh dusted off for a similar instrument already in progress (Bennet,
                yes, yours), we began to cut maple and willow and ash and beech, and
                with the help of Jessie Vallad at JJE Electronics, who custom builds
                my pickup sets and built and shipped one emegency mail in just one
                day, we built an electric Trossingen very similar (but improved) from
                the one on my website. It was a ridiculous schedule and a tough job
                to finish on time, but with the three of us working it seemed possible
                and as we pulled out of the driveway of the school (I took the girls
                out half a day early, of course, for this) and my wife was driving as
                I was tuning and stretching Nylgut strings, we knew a successful build.
                >
                > We arrived about 4 at his hotel, and he came down to greet us in the
                lobby. We had an armful of lyres, we were going to get his critiques
                and hints and tips after all, and people were stopping us in the lobby
                and asking about the instruments and the music, and we finally decided
                to return to his room for a little more focused visit. I must first
                say that Benjamin Bagby is one of the nicest, most gracious and
                down-to-earth people you would ever want to meet. I encourage my kids
                to be involved, to ask questions and to be part of what is going on
                around them, and he was glad to talk to them as if they were any other
                person, not just kids. And I had many of my suspicions confirmed - he
                is still very much a kid at heart, who likes to play with big stories
                and neat toys, who finds joy in a great epic tale and a shaggy dog
                story alike, who finds magic in music and sounds and who likes to be
                involved and active having fun in his environment as well.
                >
                > About halfway through the visit, he finally picked up the new
                Trossingen (he had no idea it was made for him) and started playing
                it. He spend quite some time with it, and finally commented that he
                thought it was quite a fine instrument - a comment not make out of
                just being polite, but because he liked it. I told him then that it
                was his, and he tried to refuse, but I had to bring out the unbeatable
                arguement. I like to build things, but I have no place to keep this
                one, so it will have to stay here in your room. You can either take
                it or leave it for the next person who stays here. Since we did
                actually build it for you, we would appreciate you taking it with you,
                but either way, it cannot come home with us.
                >
                > And so he became the new caregiver for this lyre. And I must say, I
                enjoyed his playing around with it immenseley - everything I learned
                to do on a lyre came from watching Michael and Benjamin, and I am not
                on their level at all. I know that I build a decent instrument, but
                it is nice to hear how your work can really sound when played by a pro.
                >
                > Oh, yeah, he let me play the Oberflacht that he uses, the one built
                by Thurau. I was really something, and I stumbled about on it as best
                I could, and I see why he likes it. It is a fine instrument and
                modified to provide a bigger sound (it is a surprisingly large lyre,
                wide and tall, with a bigger soundbox than anything I have ever built.
                He refers to it as his 'turbo-lyre'.)
                >
                > And then a quick there-and-back trip on Saturday from Kansas City to
                Saint Louis and back, and we were at the concert hall (a gothic
                cathedral hall) at 7:30 pm and we got front-row center seats, dressed
                in our viking and germanic clothing (the St. Louis trip was our SCA
                Kingdom 25th anniversary event, and we didn't have time to change).
                And we got to sit there in front of the virtual campfire, listening to
                a new friend do an awesome job of telling a great story, both
                daughters snuggled up to me and engrossed in the story, imaginations
                running full speed. Didn't stick around for the Q&A after the show -
                didn't need to. We had made a new friend, we were able to thank him
                for his efforts in what we found a most appropriate way, with the gift
                of a Lyre, and we had a once-in-a-lifetime experience. Bravo to Mr.
                Bagby, I couldn't come up with a better combination of skill,
                graciousness, and positive attitude and friendliness if I tried. And
                we are all glad he is a storyteller, even with the cost and travel
                hassle and everything else, it was SO much better than just another
                evening of TV shows or movies or computer games, and we would do it
                every time given the chance.
                >
                > Because of unbreakable committments starting at 9:30 this morning,
                we drove back to Arkansas through the (surprise!) snow and ice after
                the show, arriving home about 4:30 AM, bone tired but without a regret.
                >
                > And I take this break to tell this story, and now to return to the
                shop to continue on the two projects still sitting on the bench, both
                close to completion, and both the focus of some renewed enthusiasm and
                a lighter spirit by the three craftsmen working on them.
                >
                > If Bagby performs anywhere within travel distance of anyone on this
                list, I can not recommend enough that you go see him, and if you can,
                find a way to say hi in person. It is very much worth it.
                >
                > Chris
                >


              • michael king
                What a wonderful story Chris,  sounds like a really fantastic day,   Aside from that movie version there was a cartoon of beowulf that had Dr Graeme
                Message 7 of 23 , Mar 2, 2009
                • 0 Attachment
                  What a wonderful story Chris,  sounds like a really fantastic day,  

                  Aside from 'that' movie version there was a cartoon of beowulf that had Dr Graeme lawson's lyre as the music but I cannot find any link to it anywhere at the moment, I did catch a few minutes on video tape of the end, many years ago, I think it was by BBC Wales...


                  Michael

                  --- On Mon, 2/3/09, Kazimierz Verkmastare <kaz@...> wrote:
                  From: Kazimierz Verkmastare <kaz@...>
                  Subject: Re[2]: [Anglo_Saxon_Lyres] Re: Trip to see Bagby tell Beowulf
                  To: Anglo_Saxon_Lyres@yahoogroups.com
                  Date: Monday, 2 March, 2009, 1:25 PM

                  I copied it to a thumb drive that I have with me at all times, I watch it regularly - it is the best Beowulf I think I have ever seen.  And amazing enough, no Hollywood CGI, no Angelina Jolie, no special effects, nothing.
                   
                  Go figure...
                   
                  Chris

                  *********** REPLY SEPARATOR ***********

                  On 3/1/2009 at 11:09 PM LM wrote:

                  BTW: 

                  The dvd is available on amazon.com

                  Larry M

                  Beowulf (2006)

                  Starring: Benjamin Bagby Director: Stellan Olsson Rating:   Format: DVD
                   
                  25 Reviews
                  5 star:92% (23)
                  4 star:4% (1)
                  3 star:  (0)
                  2 star:4% (1)
                  1 star:  (0)

                  See all 25 customer reviews...
                  4.8 out of 5 stars See all reviews (25 customer reviews)

                  List Price:$29.99
                  Price:$26.99




                  On Sun, Mar 1, 2009 at 11:07 PM, nnaeve <nnaeve@yahoo. com> wrote:

                  Your story moved me to tears.

                  Unfortunately I'm too wrapped up in my own Beowulf to comment
                  further...but thanks!

                  Niki

                  --- In Anglo_Saxon_ Lyres@yahoogroup s.com, "Kazimierz Verkmastare"


                  <kaz@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > It is OK, occasionally, to realize that just cash on the ledger
                  sheets, while enough to get by on, is really underpayment, and that
                  providing a little bit more, something that has appropriate meaning,
                  isn't being generous, it is being fair and paying the appropriate wage
                  for someone who has provided something exceptional. And I think that
                  is something we can all agree on - most of us are real fans and know
                  that Bagby provides something exceptional - something actually priceless.
                  >
                  > I know that most times and most situation limit how much we would
                  like to give inspiring people as compensation - sometimes buying the
                  ticket and the DVD has to be enough. I just happen to be at a time
                  and in a situation where this was possible, and so it was almost a
                  moral imperative that I do it. And I gladly add to my wishes for his
                  continued success the voices of all the people he has inspired out
                  there, because I know that if circumstances allow, each and every one
                  of those he has inspired would do something similar.
                  >
                  > You are welcome, Larry. I hope that I remain in a position to
                  occasionally provide similar reward to others who have inspired me and
                  provided me with priceless knowledge and experiences.
                  >
                  > Chris
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > *********** REPLY SEPARATOR ***********
                  >
                  > On 3/1/2009 at 8:27 PM LM wrote:
                  > Your report on Benjamin and his generosity of spirit reflects my own
                  experiences. After seeing him do Beowulf for the first time about ten
                  years ago, I decided to explore the possibility of making lyres
                  myself. I got his address in Köln, wrote to him and got a very nice
                  letter back. I've since had several occasions to speak with him on
                  his visits to Boston and got his unofficial approval of several of my
                  lyres.
                  >
                  > In behalf of all of us who have been inspired by him and his work, I
                  want to thank you for your generosity in making a gift to him of your
                  excellent instrument. It is, in a way, a kind of thank you from all of
                  us, if you don't mind my putting it that way.
                  >
                  > Larry M.
                  >
                  > On Sun, Mar 1, 2009 at 7:36 PM, Kazimierz Verkmastare <kaz@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Our plans for this past weekend got sidetracked several weeks ago
                  when we found out that Benjamin Bagby would be performing Beowulf in
                  Kansas City (just a 4 hour drive away). I promptly purchased tickets
                  for myself and my girls, and on the suggestion of this list, contacted
                  Mr. Bagby's agent to see if I could find out the schedule for any
                  workshops or Q&A sessions he had. I sent along the website info for
                  our projects, especially the lyres that my girls built. And pretty
                  much forgot about it.
                  >
                  > Imagine my surprise when I got an e-mail from Mr. Bagby himself,
                  inviting us to come up and spend a couple of hours Friday (the day
                  before the performance) just visiting and looking at instruments and
                  talking with him at his hotel. He found our projects interesting, and
                  had many good things to say about the girls instruments. We had to
                  make some accomodations in schedule, but how could we say no?
                  >
                  > With a couple of projects on the bench already, the girls and I made
                  the executive decision to make room for one more - we would build Mr.
                  Bagby a lyre from our shop, something that would fill a niche that I
                  knew he didn't have an instrument to fill. So with the templates
                  fresh dusted off for a similar instrument already in progress (Bennet,
                  yes, yours), we began to cut maple and willow and ash and beech, and
                  with the help of Jessie Vallad at JJE Electronics, who custom builds
                  my pickup sets and built and shipped one emegency mail in just one
                  day, we built an electric Trossingen very similar (but improved) from
                  the one on my website. It was a ridiculous schedule and a tough job
                  to finish on time, but with the three of us working it seemed possible
                  and as we pulled out of the driveway of the school (I took the girls
                  out half a day early, of course, for this) and my wife was driving as
                  I was tuning and stretching Nylgut strings, we knew a successful build.
                  >
                  > We arrived about 4 at his hotel, and he came down to greet us in the
                  lobby. We had an armful of lyres, we were going to get his critiques
                  and hints and tips after all, and people were stopping us in the lobby
                  and asking about the instruments and the music, and we finally decided
                  to return to his room for a little more focused visit. I must first
                  say that Benjamin Bagby is one of the nicest, most gracious and
                  down-to-earth people you would ever want to meet. I encourage my kids
                  to be involved, to ask questions and to be part of what is going on
                  around them, and he was glad to talk to them as if they were any other
                  person, not just kids. And I had many of my suspicions confirmed - he
                  is still very much a kid at heart, who likes to play with big stories
                  and neat toys, who finds joy in a great epic tale and a shaggy dog
                  story alike, who finds magic in music and sounds and who likes to be
                  involved and active having fun in his environment as well.
                  >
                  > About halfway through the visit, he finally picked up the new
                  Trossingen (he had no idea it was made for him) and started playing
                  it. He spend quite some time with it, and finally commented that he
                  thought it was quite a fine instrument - a comment not make out of
                  just being polite, but because he liked it. I told him then that it
                  was his, and he tried to refuse, but I had to bring out the unbeatable
                  arguement. I like to build things, but I have no place to keep this
                  one, so it will have to stay here in your room. You can either take
                  it or leave it for the next person who stays here. Since we did
                  actually build it for you, we would appreciate you taking it with you,
                  but either way, it cannot come home with us.
                  >
                  > And so he became the new caregiver for this lyre. And I must say, I
                  enjoyed his playing around with it immenseley - everything I learned
                  to do on a lyre came from watching Michael and Benjamin, and I am not
                  on their level at all. I know that I build a decent instrument, but
                  it is nice to hear how your work can really sound when played by a pro.
                  >
                  > Oh, yeah, he let me play the Oberflacht that he uses, the one built
                  by Thurau. I was really something, and I stumbled about on it as best
                  I could, and I see why he likes it. It is a fine instrument and
                  modified to provide a bigger sound (it is a surprisingly large lyre,
                  wide and tall, with a bigger soundbox than anything I have ever built.
                  He refers to it as his 'turbo-lyre' .)
                  >
                  > And then a quick there-and-back trip on Saturday from Kansas City to
                  Saint Louis and back, and we were at the concert hall (a gothic
                  cathedral hall) at 7:30 pm and we got front-row center seats, dressed
                  in our viking and germanic clothing (the St. Louis trip was our SCA
                  Kingdom 25th anniversary event, and we didn't have time to change).
                  And we got to sit there in front of the virtual campfire, listening to
                  a new friend do an awesome job of telling a great story, both
                  daughters snuggled up to me and engrossed in the story, imaginations
                  running full speed. Didn't stick around for the Q&A after the show -
                  didn't need to. We had made a new friend, we were able to thank him
                  for his efforts in what we found a most appropriate way, with the gift
                  of a Lyre, and we had a once-in-a-lifetime experience. Bravo to Mr.
                  Bagby, I couldn't come up with a better combination of skill,
                  graciousness, and positive attitude and friendliness if I tried. And
                  we are all glad he is a storyteller, even with the cost and travel
                  hassle and everything else, it was SO much better than just another
                  evening of TV shows or movies or computer games, and we would do it
                  every time given the chance.
                  >
                  > Because of unbreakable committments starting at 9:30 this morning,
                  we drove back to Arkansas through the (surprise!) snow and ice after
                  the show, arriving home about 4:30 AM, bone tired but without a regret.
                  >
                  > And I take this break to tell this story, and now to return to the
                  shop to continue on the two projects still sitting on the bench, both
                  close to completion, and both the focus of some renewed enthusiasm and
                  a lighter spirit by the three craftsmen working on them.
                  >
                  > If Bagby performs anywhere within travel distance of anyone on this
                  list, I can not recommend enough that you go see him, and if you can,
                  find a way to say hi in person. It is very much worth it.
                  >
                  > Chris
                  >



                • simon@simonchadwick.net
                  Michael, I remember that I think, about 10 years ago, done by Welsh Channel 4? By a team of Russian animators, broadcast at Xmas. I videotaped it but the tape
                  Message 8 of 23 , Mar 2, 2009
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                    Michael, I remember that I think, about 10 years ago, done by Welsh
                    Channel 4? By a team of Russian animators, broadcast at Xmas. I
                    videotaped it but the tape got given away when I moved North. It was
                    excellent. They also I think did Gawain and the Green Knight as a
                    companion piece but it was nowhere near as good (or perhas I
                    misremember, and that was an unrelated thing close in time)

                    Simon




                    On 2 Mar 2009, at 13:34, michael king wrote:

                    > What a wonderful story Chris, sounds like a really fantastic day,
                    >
                    > Aside from 'that' movie version there was a cartoon of beowulf that
                    > had Dr Graeme lawson's lyre as the music but I cannot find any link
                    > to it anywhere at the moment, I did catch a few minutes on video
                    > tape of the end, many years ago, I think it was by BBC Wales...
                    >
                    >
                    > Michael
                  • michael king
                    Hello Simon, You are right it was Welsh Channel 4,  a joint venture with Russia , that was what I needed to find it at amazon, http://tinyurl.com/aq7tga Its
                    Message 9 of 23 , Mar 2, 2009
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                      Hello Simon,
                      You are right it was Welsh Channel 4,  a joint venture with Russia , that was what I needed to find it at amazon,
                      http://tinyurl.com/aq7tga

                      Its only half an hour long so its a good introduction to the story. 11 years ago!!

                      Michael

                      --- On Mon, 2/3/09, simon@... <simon@...> wrote:
                      From: simon@... <simon@...>
                      Subject: Beowulf animated version, was Re: Re[2]: [Anglo_Saxon_Lyres] Re: Trip to see Bagby tell Beowulf
                      To: Anglo_Saxon_Lyres@yahoogroups.com
                      Date: Monday, 2 March, 2009, 2:17 PM

                      Michael, I remember that I think, about 10 years ago, done by Welsh
                      Channel 4? By a team of Russian animators, broadcast at Xmas. I
                      videotaped it but the tape got given away when I moved North. It was
                      excellent. They also I think did Gawain and the Green Knight as a
                      companion piece but it was nowhere near as good (or perhas I
                      misremember, and that was an unrelated thing close in time)

                      Simon

                      On 2 Mar 2009, at 13:34, michael king wrote:

                      > What a wonderful story Chris, sounds like a really fantastic day,
                      >
                      > Aside from 'that' movie version there was a cartoon of beowulf that
                      > had Dr Graeme lawson's lyre as the music but I cannot find any link
                      > to it anywhere at the moment, I did catch a few minutes on video
                      > tape of the end, many years ago, I think it was by BBC Wales...
                      >
                      >
                      > Michael


                    • Tim Caldwell
                      ... wrote: Hey guys, Even I, (in backwards Australia) know what you re talking about! I ve had that show on tape for _YEARS_: an amazing
                      Message 10 of 23 , Mar 3, 2009
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                        --- In Anglo_Saxon_Lyres@yahoogroups.com, michael king
                        <michaeljking2007@...> wrote:


                        Hey guys,

                        Even I, (in backwards Australia) know what you're talking about! I've
                        had that show on tape for _YEARS_: an amazing Welsh/Russian animited
                        versions of Beowulf. It follows the original story in not giving
                        clear details or images of the supernatural characters involved, and
                        so leaves them to our imaginaton (as does the original story). It's a
                        fantastic introduction to Beowulf and I completely reccommend it! The
                        warriors actually use spears rather than swords (Hollywood wouldn't
                        approve)!!

                        And amazingly it actually does include a lyre - at one point (if I
                        remember correctly) - thrown recklessly onto the floor at the feet of
                        it's drunken sleeping owner... That shocked me more than the monster -
                        I'd never treat my lyre like that! :-)

                        Anyway, people have interpreted Beowulf in many ways, but this
                        version seems more faithful to the original in time and context than
                        most. HIGHLY RECCOMMENDED!

                        Cheers,
                        Tim
                      • LM
                        While we re on the subject, don t forget John Gardner s excellent novel, Grendel ... Lavrans
                        Message 11 of 23 , Mar 3, 2009
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                          While we're on the subject, don't forget John Gardner's excellent novel, "Grendel"...


                          Lavrans

                          On Tue, Mar 3, 2009 at 8:10 AM, Tim Caldwell <vikingtimbo650@...> wrote:

                          --- In Anglo_Saxon_Lyres@yahoogroups.com, michael king
                          <michaeljking2007@...> wrote:

                          Hey guys,

                          Even I, (in backwards Australia) know what you're talking about! I've
                          had that show on tape for _YEARS_: an amazing Welsh/Russian animited
                          versions of Beowulf. It follows the original story in not giving
                          clear details or images of the supernatural characters involved, and
                          so leaves them to our imaginaton (as does the original story). It's a
                          fantastic introduction to Beowulf and I completely reccommend it! The
                          warriors actually use spears rather than swords (Hollywood wouldn't
                          approve)!!

                          And amazingly it actually does include a lyre - at one point (if I
                          remember correctly) - thrown recklessly onto the floor at the feet of
                          it's drunken sleeping owner... That shocked me more than the monster -
                          I'd never treat my lyre like that! :-)

                          Anyway, people have interpreted Beowulf in many ways, but this
                          version seems more faithful to the original in time and context than
                          most. HIGHLY RECCOMMENDED!

                          Cheers,
                          Tim


                        • Yngona Desmond
                          Mike wrote [[I just uploaded photos of the construction process and end result of my new lyre.]] ** Great pics Mike! Its lovely! ... Yngona
                          Message 12 of 23 , Mar 3, 2009
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                            Mike wrote [[I just uploaded photos of the construction process and end result of my new lyre.]]
                            ** Great pics Mike! Its lovely!

                            ... Yngona
                          • Yngona Desmond
                            Chris wrote [[About halfway through the visit, he finally picked up the new Trossingen (he had no idea it was made for him) and started playing it. He spend
                            Message 13 of 23 , Mar 3, 2009
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                              Chris wrote [[About halfway through the visit, he finally picked up the new Trossingen (he had no idea it was made for him) and started playing it. He spend quite some time with it, and finally commented that he thought it was quite a fine instrument - a comment not make out of just being polite, but because he liked it. I told him then that it was his, and he tried to refuse, but I had to bring out the unbeatable arguement. I like to build things, but I have no place to keep this one, so it will have to stay here in your room. You can either take it or leave it for the next person who stays here. Since we did actually build it for you, we would appreciate you taking it with you, but either way, it cannot come home with us.]]
                              ** What a wonderful story Chris! And a great adventure for you all! Thank you for sharing not only your experience but your skill as a craftsman!

                              ... Yngona
                            • Mike Durling
                              Thanks Yngona and thanks to everybody else who commented. I ve been having a lot of fun playing around with it, although the music can best be described as
                              Message 14 of 23 , Mar 3, 2009
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                                Thanks Yngona and thanks to everybody else who commented. I've been
                                having a lot of fun playing around with it, although the "music" can
                                best be described as a few simple phrases repeated.

                                Lodwig...Mike Durling

                                Yngona Desmond wrote:
                                > Mike wrote [[I just uploaded photos of the construction process and end result of my new lyre.]]
                                > ** Great pics Mike! Its lovely!
                                >
                                > ... Yngona
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                > ------------------------------------
                                >
                                > Yahoo! Groups Links
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                              • L.M.
                                It s always great to see a set of photos like this and compare ideas. Thanks for sharing this with us. I too discovered the advantage of using a large piece
                                Message 15 of 23 , Mar 3, 2009
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                                  It's always great to see a set of photos like this and compare ideas. Thanks for sharing this with us.

                                  I too discovered the advantage of using a large piece of plexiglas with my router.


                                  Larry M


                                  --- In Anglo_Saxon_Lyres@yahoogroups.com, "Yngona Desmond" <yngona@...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  > Mike wrote [[I just uploaded photos of the construction process and end result of my new lyre.]]
                                  > ** Great pics Mike! Its lovely!
                                  >
                                  > ... Yngona
                                  >
                                • Mike Durling
                                  Hey Larry, Actually you were the source of the plexiglass idea. I got that from the PDF that you posted in the archives here. Like I said, most of the ideas
                                  Message 16 of 23 , Mar 3, 2009
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                                    Hey Larry,

                                    Actually you were the source of the plexiglass idea. I got that from
                                    the PDF that you posted in the archives here. Like I said, most of the
                                    ideas came from this list.

                                    Thanks!

                                    Mike D

                                    L.M. wrote:
                                    > It's always great to see a set of photos like this and compare ideas. Thanks for sharing this with us.
                                    >
                                    > I too discovered the advantage of using a large piece of plexiglas with my router.
                                    >
                                    >
                                    > Larry M
                                    >
                                    >
                                    > --- In Anglo_Saxon_Lyres@yahoogroups.com, "Yngona Desmond" <yngona@...> wrote:
                                    >
                                    >> Mike wrote [[I just uploaded photos of the construction process and end result of my new lyre.]]
                                    >> ** Great pics Mike! Its lovely!
                                    >>
                                    >> ... Yngona
                                    >>
                                    >>
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    > ------------------------------------
                                    >
                                    > Yahoo! Groups Links
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                  • LM
                                    No wonder it looked familiar! ;=) Larry
                                    Message 17 of 23 , Mar 3, 2009
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                                      No wonder it looked familiar!

                                      ;=)>

                                      Larry

                                      On Tue, Mar 3, 2009 at 9:37 PM, Mike Durling <durling@...> wrote:

                                      Hey Larry,

                                      Actually you were the source of the plexiglass idea. I got that from
                                      the PDF that you posted in the archives here. Like I said, most of the
                                      ideas came from this list.

                                      Thanks!

                                      Mike D



                                      L.M. wrote:
                                      > It's always great to see a set of photos like this and compare ideas. Thanks for sharing this with us.
                                      >
                                      > I too discovered the advantage of using a large piece of plexiglas with my router.
                                      >
                                      >
                                      > Larry M
                                      >
                                      >
                                      > --- In Anglo_Saxon_Lyres@yahoogroups.com, "Yngona Desmond" <yngona@...> wrote:
                                      >
                                      >> Mike wrote [[I just uploaded photos of the construction process and end result of my new lyre.]]
                                      >> ** Great pics Mike! Its lovely!
                                      >>
                                      >> ... Yngona
                                      >>
                                      >>
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      > ------------------------------------
                                      >
                                      > Yahoo! Groups Links
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >

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