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Ancient Rock Etchings in the Sahara and Algeria

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  • AncientStar
    Helmeted Woman? In the Tassili N Ajjer, a mysterious place, on a 500-kilometre plateau, there is the most massive collection of rock paintings and engravings
    Message 1 of 1 , Jul 1, 2007
      'Helmeted' Woman?

      In the Tassili N'Ajjer, a mysterious place, on a 500-kilometre plateau, there is the most massive collection of rock paintings and engravings in the world.  Thousands have survived the millennia and still remain intact.  Some of the figures depicted on the rocks represent legendary giants: a woman 7 feet tall and a man of 11 feet tall.  Figures wear a basket-like object or diving/space helmet on their heads.  The figure on left is that of a giant white woman and either a spider or small aborigine along with other aborigines below, which may have been added later on.
       
      The Sahara desert - once a great sea known as the Trident and  'son of Poseidon' (who was the 'great sea') which  dwindled into rivers and woods thousands of years ago was the home of these ancient giants.  They were most likely  the 'Titans who became known as the rulers of the  first ancient  Egyptian  dynasties.
       
      1 July 2007
      More ancient rock etchings found in Algeria

      More Neolithic rock etchings have been in the Algerian desert, dating back from around 8,000 years ago and showing cattle herds. Local tour guide Hadj Brahim found about 40 images near the town of Bechar, about 800 km southwest of the capital Algiers. 

      Prehistoric paintings are found in many parts of the Sahara, often portraying a garden-like environment of hunting and dancing in bright greens, yellows and reds at a time before desertification, which happened around 4,000 years ago. Algeria's best known drawings are in the southeast in the Tassili N'Ajjer mountains. The site of 15,000 images has been named the world's finest prehistoric open-air art museum by UNESCO.

      Source: Reuters (18 June 2007)

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