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'Big quick freeze' plunged Europe into ice age

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  • Ancient Star
    Big freeze plunged Europe into ice age December 02, 2009 New research has indicated that a big freeze that Europe went through almost 13,000 years ago,
    Message 1 of 3 , Dec 3, 2009
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      'Big freeze' plunged Europe into ice age

      December 02, 2009
      New research has indicated that a ‘big freeze’ that Europe went through almost 13,000 years ago, plunging it into an ice age, happened over the course of a few months, and could happen again in the future.
       
      According to a report in European Science Foundation, William Patterson, from the University of Saskatchewan in Canada, and his colleagues have shown that switching off the North Atlantic circulation can force the Northern hemisphere into a mini ‘ice age’ in a matter of months. Around 12,800 years ago the northern hemisphere was hit by a mini ice-age, known by scientists as the Younger Dryas, and nicknamed the ‘Big Freeze’, which lasted around 1300 years.
       
      Geological evidence shows that the Big Freeze was brought about by a sudden influx of freshwater, when the glacial Lake Agassiz in North America burst its banks and poured into the North Atlantic and Arctic Oceans.
       
      This vast pulse, a greater volume than all of North America’s Great Lakes combined, diluted the North Atlantic conveyor belt and brought it to a halt. Without the warming influence of this ocean circulation temperatures across the Northern hemisphere plummeted, ice sheets grew and human civilisation fell apart. 
       
      Previous evidence from Greenland ice cores has indicated that this sudden change in climate occurred over the space of a decade or so. Now, new data shows that the change was amazingly abrupt, taking place over the course of a few months, or a year or two at most. Patterson and his colleagues have created the highest resolution record of the ‘Big Freeze’ event to date, from a mud core taken from an ancient lake, Lough Monreach, in Ireland.
       
      Carbon isotopes in each slice reveal how productive the lake was, while oxygen isotopes give a picture of temperature and rainfall.
       
      At the start of the ‘Big Freeze’, their new record shows that temperatures plummeted and lake productivity stopped over the course of just a few years.
      Looking ahead to the future, Patterson said that there is no reason why a ‘Big Freeze’ shouldn’t happen again. “If the Greenland ice sheet melted suddenly, it would be catastrophic,” he said.
    • Rudi Voigt
      It still seems to me that they have it backwards. The only ice-ages the earth has even known are the relatively short-lived effects of meteor/comet impacts
      Message 2 of 3 , Dec 3, 2009
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        It still seems to me that they have it backwards. The only ‘ice-ages’ the earth has even known are the relatively short-lived effects of meteor/comet impacts and pole shifts.
        The ice age didn’t end c10,000 BC, it started 9500BC as a result of a meteor impact and resulting pole shift and lasted for c1500 years.
        Before and after that the earth was, in terms of climate, very much like it is now. Geologists have taken all the debris that formed due to the one, very short lived event, and have called it a ‘age’ and an ice-age at that, lasting tens if not hundreds of thousands of years.

         

        Obviously this Big Freeze couldn’t have happened as described here, simply because the Atlantic and the continents around it looked very different before the last pole shift. Africa extended west halfway to south America, south America was hardly a continent with just the Andes and a few alluvial planes sticking out of the sea (although it extended further to the west than it does now); Southern Europe extended out to the Azores and the arctic sea was a continental landmass know as Fenoscandia which connected Northern Europe (Scandinavia), England, Iceland, Greenland and the North Eastern part of North America in one big landmass. Basically the landmasses and Oceans were nothing like they are today. I don’t see how detailed models of water-flow based on the current geography of the Atlantic Ocean can give meaningful results for periods when the Oceans and continents were so much different than they are today. And Fenoscandia isn’t even a controversial theory. It’s in all the geology textbooks. You’d think these ‘professionals’ would remember what is in their own textbooks!!!!

         

        Rudi

         

         

        From: Ancient_History_Expanded@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Ancient_History_Expanded@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Ancient Star
        Sent: 03 December 2009 14:32
        To: Ancient_History_Expanded@yahoogroups.com
        Cc: Atlantis_Mysteries@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [Ancient_History_Expanded] 'Big quick freeze' plunged Europe into ice age

         

         

        'Big freeze' plunged Europe into ice age


        December 02, 2009

        New research has indicated that a ‘big freeze’ that Europe went through almost 13,000 years ago, plunging it into an ice age, happened over the course of a few months, and could happen again in the future.

         

        According to a report in European Science Foundation, William Patterson, from the University of Saskatchewan in Canada, and his colleagues have shown that switching off the North Atlantic circulation can force the Northern hemisphere into a mini ‘ice age’ in a matter of months. Around 12,800 years ago the northern hemisphere was hit by a mini ice-age, known by scientists as the Younger Dryas, and nicknamed the ‘Big Freeze’, which lasted around 1300 years.

         

        Geological evidence shows that the Big Freeze was brought about by a sudden influx of freshwater, when the glacial Lake Agassiz in North America burst its banks and poured into the North Atlantic and Arctic Oceans.

         

        This vast pulse, a greater volume than all of North America’s Great Lakes combined, diluted the North Atlantic conveyor belt and brought it to a halt. Without the warming influence of this ocean circulation temperatures across the Northern hemisphere plummeted, ice sheets grew and human civilisation fell apart. 

         

        Previous evidence from Greenland ice cores has indicated that this sudden change in climate occurred over the space of a decade or so. Now, new data shows that the change was amazingly abrupt, taking place over the course of a few months, or a year or two at most. Patterson and his colleagues have created the highest resolution record of the ‘Big Freeze’ event to date, from a mud core taken from an ancient lake, Lough Monreach, in Ireland.

         

        Carbon isotopes in each slice reveal how productive the lake was, while oxygen isotopes give a picture of temperature and rainfall.

         

        At the start of the ‘Big Freeze’, their new record shows that temperatures plummeted and lake productivity stopped over the course of just a few years.

        Looking ahead to the future, Patterson said that there is no reason why a ‘Big Freeze’ shouldn’t happen again. “If the Greenland ice sheet melted suddenly, it would be catastrophic,” he said.

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      • Ancient Star
        Hi Rudi. Yes, it seems so .. When one realizes just how fast time passes, 10,000 BCE was not really all that long ago. And after studying topographical
        Message 3 of 3 , Dec 5, 2009
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          Hi Rudi.  Yes, it seems so ..
           
          When one realizes just how fast time passes, 10,000 BCE was not really all that "long" ago.   And after studying topographical maps of the earth's ocean floors, I believe today's continents extended out to the very ends of the continental shelves, which were once above sea level, but now below the ocean, extending several miles or so out beyond the continents, and  then drop off thousands of feet into the oceanic abyss below them.   It is possible some land with cities might have dropped off as well?
           
          From ancient recorded history we may also confer that the ancients built their civilizations and congregated close to, and along the ancient coasts for easy commerce and travel,  although some traveled overland with wagons as they were still doing even in the 1800s.  But it appears that oceanic travel was a very common mode of travel for commerce.  It is  also recorded that the Phoenicians/Ponces were the rulers of the whole world in ancient times.  They have left evidence of their having colonized ancient counties worldwide.  Basque, an ancient Gauche/Gouche/Celtic tongue, is considered to be a very old ice-age language.  It is found in many places around the world, from Siberia, Russia, Peru, Guatemala, the mid-East, etc., ad infinitum.
           
          Underwater archeologists found that ancient exploring expeditions had set out into the lands of Scandinavia when it began to clear of glaciers and forests had again taken root in about 10,000 BCE, but suddenly there was a sudden massive flooding sometime about 9,000 BCE, which wiped out the inscribed stones they had set up for their friends, burying their "sign" under stones and rubble under the sea, and off the coast.   The glyphs showed a Danaan style boat with both ends curved upward, and men wearing animal pelt-heads on their heads.  Caesar stated that the only people living on the European coasts were Celts and Scythians, who are actually one and the same people.
          Above ancient Greek painting is of "Hercules" wearing his own animal pelt cap and mantle.  This shows him to have been an Ionian.  The ancient Ionians/Phoenicians colonized Greece and Egypt (as well as everywhere else).
           
          Regards, Kat
           
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Thursday, December 03, 2009 6:07 AM
          Subject: RE: [Ancient_History_Expanded] 'Big quick freeze' plunged Europe into ice age

          It still seems to me that they have it backwards. The only ‘ice-ages’ the earth has even known are the relatively short-lived effects of meteor/comet impacts and pole shifts.
          The ice age didn’t end c 10,000 BC, it started 9500 BC as a result of a meteor impact and resulting pole shift and lasted for c 1500 years.
          Before and after that the earth was, in terms of climate, very much like it is now. Geologists have taken all the debris that formed due to the one, very short lived event, and have called it a ‘age’ and an ice-age at that, lasting tens if not hundreds of thousands of years.

          Obviously this Big Freeze couldn’t have happened as described here, simply because the Atlantic and the continents around it looked very different before the last pole shift. Africa extended west halfway to south America, south America was hardly a continent with just the Andes and a few alluvial planes sticking out of the sea (although it extended further to the west than it does now); Southern Europe extended out to the Azores and the arctic sea was a continental landmass know as Fenoscandia which connected Northern Europe (Scandinavia), England, Iceland, Greenland and the North Eastern part of North America in one big landmass. Basically the landmasses and Oceans were nothing like they are today. I don’t see how detailed models of water-flow based on the current geography of the Atlantic Ocean can give meaningful results for periods when the Oceans and continents were so much different than they are today. And Fenoscandia isn’t even a controversial theory. It’s in all the geology textbooks. You’d think these ‘professionals’ would remember what is in their own textbooks!!!!

          Rudi

          From: Ancient_History_Expanded@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Ancient_History_Expanded@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Ancient Star
          Sent: 03 December 2009 14:32
          To: Ancient_History_Expanded@yahoogroups.com
          Cc: Atlantis_Mysteries@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [Ancient_History_Expanded] 'Big quick freeze' plunged Europe into ice age

          December 02, 2009

          New research has indicated that a ‘big freeze’ that Europe went through almost 13,000 years ago, plunging it into an ice age, happened over the course of a few months, and could happen again in the future.

          According to a report in European Science Foundation, William Patterson, from the University of Saskatchewan in Canada, and his colleagues have shown that switching off the North Atlantic circulation can force the Northern hemisphere into a mini ‘ice age’ in a matter of months. Around 12,800 years ago the northern hemisphere was hit by a mini ice-age, known by scientists as the Younger Dryas, and nicknamed the ‘Big Freeze’, which lasted around 1300 years.

          Geological evidence shows that the Big Freeze was brought about by a sudden influx of freshwater, when the glacial Lake Agassiz in North America burst its banks and poured into the North Atlantic and Arctic Oceans.

          This vast pulse, a greater volume than all of North America’s Great Lakes combined, diluted the North Atlantic conveyor belt and brought it to a halt. Without the warming influence of this ocean circulation temperatures across the Northern hemisphere plummeted, ice sheets grew and human civilisation fell apart.

          Previous evidence from Greenland ice cores has indicated that this sudden change in climate occurred over the space of a decade or so. Now, new data shows that the change was amazingly abrupt, taking place over the course of a few months, or a year or two at most. Patterson and his colleagues have created the highest resolution record of the ‘Big Freeze’ event to date, from a mud core taken from an ancient lake, Lough Monreach, in Ireland.

          Carbon isotopes in each slice reveal how productive the lake was, while oxygen isotopes give a picture of temperature and rainfall.

          At the start of the ‘Big Freeze’, their new record shows that temperatures plummeted and lake productivity stopped over the course of just a few years.

          Looking ahead to the future, Patterson said that there is no reason why a ‘Big Freeze’ shouldn’t happen again. “If the Greenland ice sheet melted suddenly, it would be catastrophic,” he said.

          http://www.hindustantimes.com/Big-freeze-plunged-Europe-into-ice-age/H1-Article1-482209.aspx

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