Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: Donation of a collection to a museum

Expand Messages
  • Joe Glass
    Dear John 100% - all factors that are essential. One of the things that greatly annoys me, is that even though there is a paucity of items pictured, & these
    Message 1 of 1 , Sep 4, 2001
      Dear John
      100% - all factors that are essential.
       
      One of the things that greatly annoys me, is that even though there is a paucity of items pictured, & these are usually duplicated through various publications, when you visit the great museums of the world, there is only a miniscule amount of their collections on display.
      I believe they also have a responsibility to the public, their owners, to adequately catalogue, photograph, & make available to scholars or any other interested party.
      Have you visitied any of the web sites of the great museums lately (eg. British, Louvre, Metropolitan). They seem more interested in selling knick-knacks than having serious information available.  What's worse, in the drive to get numbers through the doors, they're all starting to be geared for school kids, both in content & level of display.
      You'd think the web/internet was the ideal medium to be able to make their collections available to the world. Isn't this why the collections are maintained/researched - to expand the level of knowledge.
      There are some serious dichotomies there, as well as some insurmountable paradoxes.
      Joe
      Joe
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Wednesday, 5 September 2001 7:44
      Subject: Re: Donation of a collection to a museum

      Dear Joe & Darrell,

         I never stated that a museum given a significant donation of a historical
      collection of artifacts would immediately put it on the market.  Museums do
      not market the items themselves, the are the anonymous sellers at Sotheby's,
      Christie's, Butterfield's etc. auctions.  The may wait for 20 years to
      dispose of the items, they are not necessarily in a hurry.

         If you do not provide an endowment to support a collection forever it
      will eventually be given secondary status depending on the tastes of the
      Curator or Keeper of the museum.  The only way to protect the exhibit is to
      have a clause in the donation papers that provides that the collection shall
      revert to the heirs shoud the exhibit be closed, or fair market value if the
      museum wished to bring in an independent appraisor.  The appraisal and
      reimbursement to your heirs should be based upon the value of the collection
      when it is being taken out of exhibition.

         The valuation of a good collection will appreciate greatly over a period
      of generations and a good museum would be loathe to have such a collection
      revert to the heirs.

         If you do make a donation, insist that the collection be available for
      collectors, students and academics wishing to make a study of the collection.
      You do not want it to be locked up forever with no access by anyone who loves
      the subject.

      Best regards,  John Piscopo
      http://www.johnpiscoposwords.com
      PO Box 137
      Western Springs, IL 60558-0137
      (708)246-7111
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.