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Moses’ Democratic Moment

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  • hadassah
    There is something bizarre, even clumsy, about the transition of power from Moses to his right-hand man Joshua in this week s Torah reading. God tells Moses
    Message 1 of 2 , Jul 1, 2010
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      There is something bizarre, even clumsy, about the transition of power from Moses to his right-hand man Joshua in this week's Torah reading. God tells Moses that he has reached the end of his life, instructing him to climb the mountain of Avarim and die there. But who will take over?

      God doesn't even raise the subject until Moses implores: "Let the Lord . . . set a man over the congregation, . . . that the congregation of the Lord be not as sheep that have no shepherd" (Numbers 27:16–17). Only then, accepting Moses' request, does God appoint Joshua, "a man in whom is spirit," to succeed him. The fact that Moses has to ask, and in such strong language, suggests that the divine decision is almost an afterthought. Could it be that the sheep really didn't need a shepherd?


      Read the rest of this article at http://www.jewishideasdaily.com/content/detail/continue-reading-moses-democratic-moment


      Hadassah Levy
      Website manager, http://jewishideasdaily.com
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    • nietgal
      ... ========= Just dealing with this post and the Subject in general and not gong to the link: I was elated to hear a new Rabbi female say this to our Saturday
      Message 2 of 2 , Jul 1, 2010
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        --- In AncientBibleHistory@yahoogroups.com, "hadassah" <harelhadassah@...> wrote:
        >
        > There is something bizarre, even clumsy, about the transition of power from Moses to his right-hand man Joshua in this week's Torah reading. God tells Moses that he has reached the end of his life, instructing him to climb the mountain of Avarim and die there. But who will take over?
        >
        > God doesn't even raise the subject until Moses implores: "Let the Lord . . . set a man over the congregation, . . . that the congregation of the Lord be not as sheep that have no shepherd" (Numbers 27:16–17). Only then, accepting Moses' request, does God appoint Joshua, "a man in whom is spirit," to succeed him. The fact that Moses has to ask, and in such strong language, suggests that the divine decision is almost an afterthought. Could it be that the sheep really didn't need a shepherd?
        >
        >
        > Read the rest of this article at http://www.jewishideasdaily.com/content/detail/continue-reading-moses-democratic-moment
        >
        >
        > Hadassah Levy
        > Website manager, http://jewishideasdaily.com
        > Connect with us on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/jewishideasdaily
        > Follow us on Twitter at http://twitter.com/jewishideas
        >
        =========
        Just dealing with this post and the Subject in general and not gong to the link:

        I was elated to hear a new Rabbi female say this to our Saturday Study group: She thought in college that Deuteronomy was boring. Now she finds it exciting.

        It was wonderful to find a grandchild generation come to this exciting finding at the same time I did. Nowadays, SCOTUS is all about Deuteronomy for me. The verse that says: YaHWeH has given us all the tools, now use them and then outlines representative government is so soothing. Deuteronomy serves me as the application of the prior 4 books. As in backlog. It also separates Church and State in nation building, but encourages Church at the same time. Non-profits.

        I think 2500? years ago the Deuteronomist was the Middle Eastern Ancient Bible History originator. Especially since the Egyptian Book of the Dead Spell 125 has echoes of voices of Middle Eastern ordinary people.

        Another similar subject citation is Samuel and the population's cry for a King. I couldn't have said it better. In fact, I did some findlaw which told me, years ago, that the application of King to the US President was a majority application.

        I think of the dietary laws as Health Reform et al. Food and Drug Admin.
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