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Scholars Examine 1,700-year-old Perfume for Remains of Jesus' Cross

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  • robert-blau@webtv.net
    I m not sure if I m willing to take the word of Dr. Sergey Torbatov from the Archaeological Institute with the Bulgarian Academy of Science, but . . . Scholars
    Message 1 of 3 , Aug 1, 2009
      I'm not sure if I'm willing to take the word of Dr. Sergey Torbatov from
      the Archaeological Institute with the Bulgarian Academy of Science, but
      . . .

      Scholars Examine 1,700-year-old Perfume for Remains of Jesus' Cross
      Standart News [Bulgaria], 14 July 2009

      Bulgarian archaeologists have found a 1700-year-old perfume in the
      locality Kaleto (the Fortress) near the town of Mezdra (northwestern
      Bulgaria). In a bronze container they discovered a piece of wood.
      According to the leader of the expedition, Dr. Sergey Torbatov from the
      Archaeological Institute with the Bulgarian Academy of Science, there is
      a great chance that the wooden piece is part of the cross of Jesus
      Christ. However, it will be known for sure after a carbon analysis
      dating is made.

      http://paper.standartnews.com/en/article.php?d=2009-07-14&article=28093
    • Nully
      ... I don t see how carbon dating can ever establish the claim. It can only establish whether or not the wood might be old enough to qualify. Any one know
      Message 2 of 3 , Aug 1, 2009
        robert-blau@... wrote:
        > I'm not sure if I'm willing to take the word of Dr. Sergey Torbatov from
        > the Archaeological Institute with the Bulgarian Academy of Science, but
        > . . .
        >
        > Scholars Examine 1,700-year-old Perfume for Remains of Jesus' Cross
        > Standart News [Bulgaria], 14 July 2009
        >
        > Bulgarian archaeologists have found a 1700-year-old perfume in the
        > locality Kaleto (the Fortress) near the town of Mezdra (northwestern
        > Bulgaria). In a bronze container they discovered a piece of wood.
        > According to the leader of the expedition, Dr. Sergey Torbatov from the
        > Archaeological Institute with the Bulgarian Academy of Science, there is
        > a great chance that the wooden piece is part of the cross of Jesus
        > Christ. However, it will be known for sure after a carbon analysis
        > dating is made.
        >
        > http://paper.standartnews.com/en/article.php?d=2009-07-14&article=28093



        I don't see how carbon dating can ever establish the claim. It can only
        establish whether or not the wood 'might' be old enough to qualify. Any
        one know what sort of wood the cross was supposed to have been made from?

        Nully
      • Jon Smyth
        ... I think most people will guess that nobody knows, but one common suggestion is that the cross was made from a Dogwood tree. The pictures I see of Dogwood
        Message 3 of 3 , Aug 2, 2009
          --- In AncientBibleHistory@yahoogroups.com, Nully <barbfres@...> wrote:
          > Any one know what sort of wood the cross was supposed to have been
          >made from?

          I think most people will guess that nobody knows, but one common suggestion is that the cross was made from a Dogwood tree. The pictures I see of Dogwood trees show them to be too small to provide long stout limbs to support a human body.
          Another suggestion was that analysis of wood fragments preserved around the world (reputadly to have been part of 'a' cross), seem to be Pine fragments.

          I wouldn't be surprised if any forum dedicated to Roman studies would have an opinion on the common wood used by the Roman military to crucify criminals. It might have been a state industry at some point :-(

          Regards, Jon
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