Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: FYI: On line Hebrew-English Dictionary

Expand Messages
  • andrej1234au
    Hi John ... When not the property of their god. ... We also encounter such in the Hebrew Bible, in both the masculine and feminine forms, qd$ and qd$h. These
    Message 1 of 34 , Feb 1, 2008
    View Source
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi John

      > ... there were love "officiants", including women not owned,
      > considered to own themselves, ...

      When not the property of their god.

      > ... called qadishtu ...

      We also encounter such in the Hebrew Bible, in both the masculine and
      feminine forms, qd$ and qd$h. These would seem to have been temple
      prostitutes, something expressed by the translation of the former by
      the English 'sodomite' and the latter 'whore'.

      > As practitioners, free to take lovers as they wished
      > they were called "harimtu", and were not supposed to
      > associate with the belu women (from "haramu" = separate).

      Interesting: nzr means 'separate' in Hebrew.

      > These women (and men in this category), often ran their own
      > businesses, often taverns (bit sabi, bit sabiti) ...

      This is also interesting: it makes me wonder what the story of
      Zipporah's institution of circumcision whilst at the inn is really
      about. It may be that circumcision has less to do with hygienic
      practice and more with religious ritual after all (by which I mean
      the sort of ritual which took place in these 'inns').

      And what is the meaning of bit sabiti, 'house of rest'? An
      interesting name for a brothel, don't you think? But if the word is
      cognate with Hebrew $bt, then where does that leave the Sabbath, and
      why the emphasis upon the number seven (I understand that to this day
      in Western and Central Asia the 'weekend; consists of only one day).

      aj
    • George
      John, ... I m perfectly fine with this. I ll even say it is CLEARLY TRUE. My discussion pointed to some of Walter s insights on what pointed to a general fear
      Message 34 of 34 , Feb 7, 2008
      View Source
      • 0 Attachment
        John,

        You end your post:

        > Clearly the older idea of the younger seventh generation gods going
        > on strike and resting, becomes in Hebrew terms, Elohim (the creator
        > (s)) resting on the seventh day.

        I'm perfectly fine with this. I'll even say it is CLEARLY TRUE.

        My discussion pointed to some of Walter's insights on what
        pointed to a general fear of the 7th Day (or the Sabbath),
        and the desire to NOT work.

        A conventional view is that the creation story was written
        about God creating the world in six days and resting.... and
        thus the Jews created or endorsed a day of rest for humans.

        It is my view that at a much earlier time there was a general
        fear of inciting the gods, or becoming to noticeable, on this
        (quasi-magical?) Sabbath.

        Where exactly this religious fear or dread comes from I am not
        expert enough to say. But I strongly support the idea that
        when the scribes of Genesis sought to explain a pre-existing
        "tradition", they re-worked known mythology to offer a BETTER
        explanation: because Yahweh decided to take a nap on Saturday.

        The Igigi being 7th generation is just fine. Love it.
        I also love the fact the "Host" can also mean "the Seven" ...
        where the Seven were a set of "evil/good helpers" to the
        underworld (known to the Assyrians).

        But I digress. I'm focusing on which direction we find
        "causality" for the human day of rest.

        Regards,

        George


        --- In AncientBibleHistory@yahoogroups.com, "John" <jdcroft@...> wrote:
        >
        > George wrote
        >
        > > I do not see (yet) any indication of Babylonian gods RESTING
        > > on the 7th day. I know of Babylonians FEARING gods on the 7th
        > > day.
        > >
        > > It is my impression that God resting on the 7th day is a Hebrew
        > > innovation. But maybe I missed something. Please correct me
        > > if I'm wrong.
        >
        > George, the labour on the fields was carried out by gods of second
        > rank, the Igigi (the seventh generation gods), on behalf of the more
        > important gods, their leaders, Gods of the previous six generations -
        > called the Anunnaki. The story starts with a revolt by the Igigi.
        > They bang the door and went on strike, protesting before their chief
        > employer Enlil. No work on the fields eventually means famine, so the
        > gods panic and convene a general assembly, this time presided by the
        > chief Anu himself. The solution proposed by the intelligent Ea is to
        > create mankind who would have as prime duty to work on the fields, to
        > fulfill the role of servants towards the gods, allowing the Igigi to
        > rest. Men feed, cloth and shelter the gods and thus replace the
        > labour done previously by the Igigi, and this is why men has to work
        > so hard...... Their sole purpose is to be devoted to the gods. It is
        > possible that the Igigi represent the younger gods of the Akkadians
        > and the Anunnaki the older Sumerian gods. Some have suggested between
        > the lines of the Epic one could read a struggle for equal rights,
        > possibly reflecting such a struggle between the Sumerians and the
        > Akkadians. Other theories (e.g. due to von Soden) deny the resulting
        > settlement and agreement between the gods. It is said that in fact
        > the Igigi seized power over the Anunnaki. They, the Igigi, the
        > seventh generation gods of the heaven, become at the top and are the
        > consulting gods in the assembly, eventually dominated by seven `Great
        > Gods'. In this theory the Igigi dislodge the Anunnaki to the
        > Netherworld (but this theory has generated controversy and is not
        > widely held).
        >
        > Clearly the older idea of the younger seventh generation gods going
        > on strike and resting, becomes in Hebrew terms, Elohim (the creator
        > (s)) resting on the seventh day.
        >
        > Hope this helps.
        >
        > John
        >
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.