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ABH Re: Ea/Anu/Tiamat & Celestial Paths

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  • andrej1234au
    Holly ... Nice post, Holly. One problem, though: you write YHWH originated as a god of the desert who became universalized under Persian influence into The
    Message 1 of 121 , Nov 30, 2006
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      Holly

      > Ea was NOT a creator god. He protected men from the
      > the creator god Anu. YHWH was not an astral god. He
      > can be associated with mountains but nowhere in the OT
      > is YHWH declared as a god of underground waters. Being
      > a god of Edom (Adam) and Seir does not make him a god
      > of only a specific aspect of those locations. YHWH was
      > the supreme god of the universe. Now, you may argue
      > that the Hebrews (Shasu) during their sojurn in
      > Egyptian territory, began to image YHWH as a bull.
      > There is evidence of that. However, there are no
      > assoications of YHWH with astral aqueous
      > constellations as a fish, whale, leviathan etc. Nor is
      > he considered to be a fertility god associated with
      > Spring and planting.
      > George, YHWH originated as a god of the desert who
      > became universalized under Persian influence into The
      > God like Ahura Mazda. YHWH is associated with desert
      > features as mountains, plains and sudden desert
      > storms. He was a fearsome god because the desert was
      > harsh with its long dry seasons, sudden desert storms
      > which caused flooding and vast areas of infertile
      > land. Ea was not a feasome god. He was the benevolent
      > god who aided mankind through the gift of 2 rivers.
      > YHWH was a god of harsh justice and strict laws which
      > reflected the intricacies of tribal life. Ea was a a
      > fertility god who had numerous affairs. I guess I
      > could go on and on.
      > What I will concede is that the Hebrews adopted a lot
      > of Babylonian myths and attributed them to YHWH. Some
      > of these Ea myths, the great flood, the confusion of
      > languages, the creation of mankind was attributed by
      > the Hebrews to YHWH. However, I think that YHWH the
      > desert god preceded these myths which were later
      > absorbed into YHWH's story. I also do not think that
      > YHWH developed His universality and oneness until the
      > Persian occupation. I also think that Jesus was
      > developed as a god to give YHWH a more compassionate
      > personality who was involved with human beings like
      > Ea. Jesus as a god is actually much more like Ea than
      > YHWH. This includes his sympathy for mankind, his role
      > as demiurge, his association with sheep (Ea's animal
      > association was a goat), water and fish/fisherman. If
      > you want to compare Ea to a "bliblical" god, Jesus is
      > much more a candidate than YHWH.

      Nice post, Holly.

      One problem, though: you write 'YHWH originated as a god of the
      desert who became universalized under Persian influence into The God
      like Ahura Mazda'. How are we to interpret this idea in light of
      Persian monotheism? I would have thought that a better suggestion
      would be that Yahweh's 'great god' attribute came from the Greeks
      identifying him with Zeus.

      aj
    • aris hobeth
      (I think you mean moot. Or perhaps you do mean that I should be mute.) Sincerely, Aris M. Hobeth andrej1234au wrote: Aris
      Message 121 of 121 , Dec 4, 2006
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        (I think you mean moot. Or perhaps you do mean that I should be mute.) Sincerely, Aris M. Hobeth

        andrej1234au <andrej1234au@...> wrote: Aris

        > How can you prove symbolism?

        Exactly, Aris. And your seeing what you want hardly constitutes proof
        either, does it?

        > Sekhmet therefore is a version of Hathor a cow goddess
        > coming from the direction of the sun, as do most comets.

        It was Hathor who slew the 'people in the desert', Aris, and she was
        a form of Re's Eye, not some comet.

        > The flight path is given: "from the eye of Ra".

        Where does it say that, Aris?

        > Most scholars would rather fall to the temptation that the tale
        > is fictional amusement not involving reality.

        I believe it is reality, you want to fancifulise it.

        > And scholars lean too much to a scientific "proof" requirement.

        Probably because if you can't prove that there was a comet at that
        point in human history, your entire argument is mute.

        aj






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